Pulley Systems

  • Machine reliability is a top priority and continuing challenge in marine applications, which operate in harsh conditions and at remote locations far from port and repair facilities.  Ship operators can help keep machinery running efficiently by equipping their maintenance departments and crews with a full complement of new-generation maintenance tools. These tools, which range from high-accuracy alignment systems to precise automatic lubricators, can help avert premature failures and reduce the need for repairs at sea.

    Tanker Operator Improves Pulley Alignment

    Many ship operators have modernized their maintenance practices and tools as part of overall reliability efforts.  A case in point is a major tanker operator with a fleet of 55 ships, based in the U.K. One pressing area of concern for the operator was pulley alignment.  Belt failures in key machines had caused costly downtime and sometimes reduced a vessel’s operating efficiency. The root cause was usually misalignment.
    The company decided to upgrade its existing alignment practices, which were cumbersome and lacked the necessary degree of accuracy.
    The operator evaluated several advanced alignment systems and eventually opted for a laser-equipped belt alignment system consisting of a laser-emitting unit and a receiver unit.  The two units are securely positioned in pulley grooves during operation, allowing the alignment of pulleys having varying widths and dissimilar faces.  Users can detect horizontal, vertical and parallel misalignment and adjust belts and pulleys accordingly.  The system’s design is intuitive, requiring minimal training for ship engineers.  
    After the upgrade, company officials reported an immediate improvement in alignment accuracy.  The end result was more reliable machine operation across the entire fleet.

    Matching Solutions
    Different types of rotating machines have varying operating parameters and maintenance needs. Assembling a set of solutions that match the requirements of key application platforms prior to leaving port is a best maintenance practice. For example, new-generation maintenance solutions, such as single-point lubricators, can help optimize vibrating screen performance and cut the risk of failure.  Vibrating screens are employed to sort the catch on fishing vessels and to transport certain bulk materials.  In addition to harsh conditions, the screens experience high temperatures, acceleration and speeds ranging from 1,000 to 2,000 rpm. Common causes of failure include fretting corrosion on the shafts and lubrication and bearing cage problems. 
    Single-point lubricators attach directly to bearing positions in screens and supply a precise, regulated flow of lubricant.  One popular type consists of a transparent canister filled with up to 125 milliliters of lubricant. Once activated, a built-in piston propels lubricant per the user’s pre-determined setting from the canister.  Depending on the application and flow rate, lubricators can function for six months or more without a refill.  This long shelf life can help avert the need for re-lubing at sea, which takes time and can introduce contaminants to the screen bearings.
    Vibrating screens are typically driven by and coupled with electric motors and gearboxes. Like pulleys, they must be properly aligned with coupled machines for efficient operation.  New hand-held shaft alignment tools generate real-time alignment values, enabling users to gradually adjust coupled machines until they are correctly aligned. 
    During screen operation, vibration-monitoring devices and electrical discharge detectors allow workers to assess machine health in real time.  Vibration devices typically gather velocity and enveloped acceleration vibration data, compare it automatically with preprogramm`ed guidelines, and give early indications of conditions that may cause failure.  Discharge detectors monitor operating electric motors, such as those driving vibrating screens, and identify potentially damaging electrical erosion. A similar set of maintenance solutions can be utilized for other marine applications, including refrigeration and ice-making equipment, conveyors, cranes, pumps and fans. 

    Mounting/Dismounting
    Ship maintenance departments can benefit from the ability to mount and dismount rotating components at sea.  Applications with large components can be designed beforehand to accommodate oil injection mounting/dismounting.  Oil injection employs a thin film of pressurized oil to drive components onto shafts or safely remove them. For smaller components, portable induction heaters are ideal for on-board use.  One ship operator in the Middle East, for example, acquired 20 high-frequency induction heaters for mounting bearings in small motors. The heaters weigh only 10 lbs. and are easy to handle and store. They heat bearings in bore sizes from 0.8 to 4 inches and weighing up to 11 lbs.  An added benefit is that the heaters do not magnetize bearings while heating them. This reduces the risk of small-particle contamination and makes a demagnetization cycle unnecessary.   

    The Author
    Paul Michalicka is North American area sales manager for maintenance products, SKF USA Inc., Lansdale, Pa. He can be contacted at
    e: Paul.Michalicka@skf.com
    t: 416-806-6723
     

    (As published in the June 2014 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter)

  • can benefits from this practice.Early electric motors were operated at one speed, guided by available current and voltage and often drive belt and pulley systems that mechanically controlled system speed and power. As motors evolved, efficiency improved, mostly by changing output control from mechanical

  • of the carriage plate and blade arm assembly is provided by a V-belt and crank shaft assembly. The V-belt runs around an electric motor driven drive pulley and an idler pulley which features a shock absorbing mechanism to extend the life of the drive belt. The arm and blade assembly are fully adjustable

  • kind of fittings and accessories for deck machinery, cargo handling and other applications, including forged fittings, hooks, blocks, sheaves, pulleys, load binders, chain, etc. The catalog describes all of the products of all divisions in full detail with photos, detailed drawings, measurements

  • kind of fitting and accessories for deck machinery, cargo handling, and other applications, including forged fittings, hooks, blocks, sheaves, pulleys, load binders, and chain. For further information on The Crosby Group, and a free 180-page full-color catalog describing all of the products

  • speed function such as RPM, Feet Per Second, Units Per Hour, etc. Also shown are various drive systems supplied by the company — couplings, gears, pulleys, rack and pinions, etc. — that connect the system to virtually any type of machine or process control system and provide accurate indication

  • vessel from the water, and air is used to float the vessel on land to and from the repair area. The Lemvig Lift has no winches or tracks, and no pulley, cables or wheels to rust or wear out. Offshore Industries claims that it is virtually troublefree, easy and economical to operate, simple in design

  • a distance of about 17 feet. The pumping horsepower of the "32" has been increased by about 1,000 hp through the addition of a pump supplied by Mobile Pulley, and the dredge's digging capacity was increased almost 50 percent by stepping up the cutter power from 800 hp to 1,200 hp

  • , firefighting, deck wash, fuel oil and ballast transfer, fish washing, etc. The pumps can be supplied as bare s h a f t units, or complete with clutch pulleys, clutch couplings, electric motors, diesel engines, etc. For f u r t h e r information and a f r e e copy of brochure, Write 15 on Reader Service Car

  • electronics and a futuristic Carambatdesigned "hula hoop" helm. The hubless stainless steel loop will be supported by two sheaths which will house the pulleys and serve to steer the boat. The upper deck will include a full pilot's station and a helicopter landing pad. The Webb Tide II is expected to travel

  • . Mr. Rose has for years been a successful independent hydraulic dredge design consultant. Prior to that he served in engineering capacities at Mobile Pulley and Kennecott. Mr. Rose has an engineering degree from Penn State. Mr. Bowe and Mr. Little explained that the changes were necessary to guide the

  • filters being blocked by the silt and other debris in the River Thames. The engine is also supplied with a Power Take Off (PTO) shaft and three grove pulley. It is not the most complex or sophisticated vessel in the world, but it does play a key role in our navigation maintenance and salvage operations

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