Car Decks

  • A number of commercial and regulatory factors have contributed to growth in the RoRo ship upgrading and conversion market over the past year, particularly in the North European arena: The abolition of tax-free sales on ferries in intra-EU traffic forced shipowners to find new sources of revenue.

    A declining number of passengers can be countered by converting ships to carry more cargo: for example, by reconfiguring car decks or exploiting former passenger cabin and amenity areas to accommodate more trucks and trailers — and fewer cars.

    • Continual search for higher profitability from existing assets rather than investment in new tonnage dictates maximization of cargo capacity and optimisation of handling to speed traffic flows and shorten times in port. A conversion to allow loading and discharging on two levels may be considered, for example, and the retrofit of auto-mooring equipment.

    • Safety issues, with maritime authorities and classification societies dictating upgrading/conversion measures by shipowners to maintain certification.

    • Trade within the European Union has increased and demanded more cargo transportation capacity.

    Increasing road congestion and air pollution call for less-polluting transport solutions. An EU program aims for improved inter-modal freight services, easing the movement of cargo between land, river and sea. and stimulating shipowners to seek more flexibility and efficiency from their fleet units.

    • Low interest rates, making investment in upgradings and conversions more attractive.

    • Competition from new players entering an arena, such as the Baltic, influencing established ferry operators in the region to execute upgradings or conversions to sustain business.

    Swift and cost-effective upgradings/conversions to suit a ship for a different service, freight mix or terminal — or to meet new safety rules — are valued by RoRo passenger and freight ferry operators in changing market conditions. Such projects help to maintain or increase revenues on an established route or to redeploy tonnage in more profitable trades.

    Tapping experience from what it claims is the world's largest installed RoRo equipment base. MacGREGOR has executed numerous modernization and conversion projects — often on a turn-key basis embracing initial study, technical solution, design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning. Specialist teams aim to eliminate or minimize downtime by performing as much work as possible while the ship is in service.

    Participation by MacGREGOR as an invited specialist in the post-Estonia disaster committee contributed to the Nordic Rule proposals — covering the strength, securing and locking arrangements for bow doors and visors — subsequently adopted by the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS). These addressed the first line of defense (preventing water from entering the vehicle deck).

    MacGREGOR has since supplied inner bow doors and carried out bow reinforcements for numerous ferries.

    In tackling the second line of defense (improving the ship's survivability if water enters the vehicle deck), the company has undertaken numerous retrofits of flood control doors on RoPax ferries.

    Dividing the car deck into watertight compartments with longitudinal or transverse barriers is an efficient way of improving the survivability of damaged RoRo ferries. Flood control doors prevent the free water from spreading over the whole car deck, and thus decrease the total free surface effect and its potential to capsize the vessel.

    Side-stowing and top-stowing jalousie types as well as hemicyclic and telescopic doors can be selected from a MacGREGOR portfolio developed to minimize loss of cargo space, operational interference, first cost and weight. Reliability and low maintenance demands were also sought by the designers. Effective 'defense barrier' hardware is vital but some RoRo ferry casualties have underlined the importance of owners and crews being committed to a rigorous operational regime and to maintaining equipment subject to arduous duty. A pro-active approach is urged by MacGREGOR.

    embracing regular inspections and reports by specilaists to secure sustained ship safety and cargo handling efficiency.

    Operators can take advantage of continual equipment and system refinements.

    with relatively small investments often proving highly cost effective.

    Upgrading hydraulic or electric systems, for example, is a common option as original equipment ages and components needing replacement become more difficult to source. These can be replaced by contemporary equivalents or by more modern alternatives.

    A typical upgrading is the replacement of a manually-operated system by an electro-hydraulic PLC-controlled system, which, via push-button operation, controls the sequences and leaves the PLC to check the signal when the operation is completed.

    A new development proving attractive for RoRo ship newbuildings as well as retrofit projects is MacGREGOR's COREX panel for creating fixed and hoistable car decks/ramps. The stainless steel sandwich construction yields a significantly reduced profile (approximately one-third the depth) and about half the weight of an equivalent conventional steel panel.

    The resulting lower lightship weight, reduced molded depth and increased stability can be exploited to maximize the operational flexibility of a RoRo ship and extend payload configurations.

    Improved profitability and a higher second- hand value are thus promoted.

    Weight reduction was a prime factor in Sams0 Linien's decision to retrofit lightweight COREX panel-based hoistable car decks to its small vehicle/passenger ferry Sam-Sine. A larger free height above and below the hoistable car deck was also sought. Replacing the existing hoistable deck with a 98 x 13 ft. (30 x 2.4m) COREX version secured a weight reduction of 10 tons and extra free height on the main vehicle deck. The Danish owner can also anticipate lower maintenance costs from the stainless steel construction.

    Ships with conventional car decks and a trailer deck free height suitable for accompanied trailer traffic can be converted to take unaccompanied trailers or to accommodate higher trailers by installing COREX decks. The standardization and modularity of a car deck built from COREX panels foster short lead times for conversion projects, says MacGREGOR, and the containerfriendly decks and associated components can be shipped pre-assembled or for final assembly close to the customer.

    Hyundai Heavy Industries ordered COREX panels for the hoistable car decks and ramps of two Seapacer-class RoPax ferries booked by the Swedish owner Stena RoRo. COREX panels were selected for the car decks because of their impact on lowering weight and their significantly reduced thickness compared with conventional car decks.

    The latter characteristic enabled the designer to meet the owner's strict specifications for maximum free height on the cargo deck without compromising the stability of the ship.

    Circle 6 5 on Reader Service Card www.maritimereporterinfo.com

  • , with day facilities for 2,000 passengers, is located in mid-ships leaving the aft end of the vessel open. The cargo is transported on two large car decks. Trailers and trucks are located on the main car deck, which has enough free height over the entire deck for high vehicles, and on the open aft

  • the lower hold. With only cars onboard the main hold including the total hoistable deck will take 624 cars and the lower hold will take 79 cars. Both car decks offer additional parking area for a total of 142 motorbikes. The ferry features a stern and bow ramp for loading and unloading, and both ramps

  • NKK (Nippon Kokan) of Japan recently delivered the 42,000-dwt car/bulk carrier Merak Eighty, fitted with temporarily hoistable cardecks, to Irvine Shipping Inc. of Liberia. Shin-ichi Hirayama, president of NKK America Incorporated, said the bulk carrier is NKK's first new vessel equipped with such

  • The 10,848-dwt, diesel-powered vehicle carrier Toyofuji 7 (shown above) was delivered recently to Toyofuji Kaiun Kaisha, Ltd. of Japan by Hitachi Zosen, Tokyo. The ship was built at the Setoda Shipyard of Naikai Zosen, a Hitachi affiliate. The vessel is 178 meters long by 29 meters wide by 26.2

  • items of cargo access gear per ship: an angled stern ramp/door and side ramp/door; nine internal ramps and four internal ramp covers; four liftable car decks, each covering the complete cargo area; two mobile deck lifters; four shell doors, two for bunker and two for pilot access; and a main hydraulic pump

  • trucks, large and small buses, car knock-downs, and containers, in addition to passenger cars. Including the upper deck, the ship has a total of 13 car decks, the fourth and sixth of which are hoistable to permit height adjustments. In addition to a midship shore ramp, there is a stern ramp over which

  • of 5,300 cars, is designed to transport microbuses, large buses and forklifts, in addition to passenger cars and trucks. The ship has a total of 13 car decks, the seventh and ninth of which are liftable decks that permit height adjustment. On either side at the center and on the starboard of the stern

  • in early June for service between Valencia, Spain and the Balearic Islands, i.e. Majorca, Ibiza, etc. Designed for 880 passengers and 200 cars, TMV 115 is a 377 ft. (115-m) monohull ferry powered by four 7,200 kW Caterpillar 3618 diesels. The car deck uses an innovative combination of hoistable

  • Ab. As the Wellamo will spend only about one hour in port, special attention was given to reducing the time required for unloading and loading the car decks, handling provisions and stores, and discharging waste ashore. As in the Svea, careful consideration has been given to the special requirements

  • , including the choice of hull material. The additional truck lane meters of the TMV 115 have been obtained by using hoistable central and outboard car decks to allow for these taller vehicles. The car decks may be quickly hoisted upwards in a variety of configurations depending on loading requirements

  • capacity. If an elevator is the only means of transporting cargo to and from a deck, alternative means of operation must be considered. Car decks: Car decks should be stowable to the overhead and lockable with a minimum amount of lost space. Heights under stowed car decks should be sufficient f

  • MR Jul-19#4th Cover MAXIMUM PROTECTION  
FOR YOUR VESSEL,  
YOUR EQUIPMENT
AND)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4th Cover

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  • MR Jul-19#43  and cost, of incidents such as  cargo losses. Yet, at the same)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    through performance monitoring a reality as evidenced by the growing and early intervention and help mitigate number, and cost, of incidents such as cargo losses. Yet, at the same time, acci- ? res on large container vessels; major dents continue to happen due to overreli- losses on car carriers, which

  • MR Jul-19#42  breakdowns and accidents from  Cargo ships (15) accounted)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    of total losses is a litical instability and risk is nothing new positive, it is balanced with the fact that prevent breakdowns and accidents from Cargo ships (15) accounted for a third in shipping circles, but it has heightened the number of reported shipping inci- turning into major losses. However

  • MR Jul-19#32 , 
build and launch The Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection brand)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    Design of Sweden Fit for Design Tillberg Design of Sweden has been a central player in the six-year quest to envision, design, build and launch The Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection brand. It has had a hand in all design aspects, from vessel exterior and interior, down to the service organization and the crew

  • MR Jul-19#30 The Ritz Carlton Yacht 
Collection ships 
are predictably)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection ships are predictably high speci- ? cation. Picutred right is the signature sun deck. Below, starting left: The Loft; The Owner’s Suite dayroom; The Deck Plans. All Photos: The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection & Tillberg Design of Sweden perior. The Great Lakes hold a

  • MR Jul-19#29 Photo: The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection
A ‘Bird’s Eye’)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    Photo: The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection A ‘Bird’s Eye’ view of the Ritz Carlton cruise ship as it will look when delivered later this year. To the right, a starboard view of the ship under construction. Photos: The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection real access to the sea. “The loft suites are itinerarie

  • MR Jul-19#27 Photo: The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection
By Lisa Overing
s)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    Photo: The Ritz Carlton Yacht Collection By Lisa Overing s privately owned, luxury yachts near the size of the average cruise ship, behold a new option, which is anything but commonplace: The Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection. At 624 feet and 11 decks, her exterior pro? le resembles a sleek superyacht design

  • MR Jul-19#25  owners, about as much as 2,000 
cars per year. Its six engines)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    of sales for Scandinavia. He adds that the North Sea Giant will cut two million liters per year of fuel costs for its owners, about as much as 2,000 cars per year. Its six engines can run as three, and its three battery packs are sim- ilar to the Fred Olsen wind-carrier jack- up vessel. “An electrical

  • MR Jul-19#21  tricks to coerce users into car-
monitor fuel use, and)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 21

    and psy- optimize vessel performance, be upwards of 90% – are junk, ranging GTMailPlus solution, for example, is a chological tricks to coerce users into car- monitor fuel use, and cut ves- from harmless marketing spam to emails mail ? ltering system that protects sys- rying out manual steps which allow

  • MR Jul-19#19  optimized, 
since most of the cargo is ftted in the 
component)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    also shows some interesting operational features. If you ft the containers in the wing, the structural design is actually optimized, since most of the cargo is ftted in the component that provides the lift. (In aerospace that is called spanwise wing- loading). Once you ft the containers in the wing

  • MR Jul-19#17 O
OPINION: ON POINT WITH JOE KEEFE
Joseph Keefe
Joseph)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 17

    O OPINION: ON POINT WITH JOE KEEFE Joseph Keefe Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the editor of both Maritime Logistics Professional and MarineNews magazines. He can be reached at jkeefe@maritimeprofessional.com Trade, Trump & Trust s we rapidly churn towards

  • MR Jul-19#16  maritime matters, 
including cargo claims, personal injury)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    , marine insurance, sal- vage, regulatory and energy matters. Schultz is a seasoned litigator, focusing on admiralty and maritime matters, including cargo claims, personal injury defense, charter party disputes, product liability and marine insurance. Dutra Group v. Batterton: What Every Shipowner

  • MR Jul-19#4  River  matters, including cargo claims, personal injury)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    and maritime Email: mrcirc@marinelink.com Web: www.marinelink.com natural gas (LNG) for the Coast Guard’s new ? eet of Inland River matters, including cargo claims, personal injury defense, charter t: (212) 477-6700 Tenders. party disputes, product liability and marine insurance. f: (212) 254-6271 Ewing

  • MP Q2-19#46   and three signi?cant events on car carriers. Misdeclared cargo)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 46

    with a number of recent problems on container ships ure. So it goes back to asking: we’re collecting all this data, but how and three signi?cant events on car carriers. Misdeclared cargo, in- are we using it? Are we really using it in the predictive model?” cluding incorrect labeling/packaging of dangerous

  • MP Q2-19#28 US Navy Port Logistics
Gas Turbine System Technician)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 28

    US Navy Port Logistics Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Raymond Htut inspects a fuel sample for color and clarity aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided- missile destroyer USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54) during a replenishment-at-sea with the feet replenishment oiler USNS John Ericsson (T-AO

  • MP Q2-19#16  links on the landside, for cargo originating 
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    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    ports will need to work closely with their regional and complimentary regional ports. The new ecosystem will see multi-modal links on the landside, for cargo originating LQODQGEXWZLOODOVRÀQDOO\H[SHULHQFHDYLDEOHFRDVWDORFHDQ DOWHUQDWLYHWUDQVSRUWDWLRQOLNHO\WDNLQJWKHIRUPRIFRQWDLQHU RUWUDLOHURQEDUJHDVDYLWDOFRQQHFWRU

  • MP Q2-19#13  the East Coast to have all its cargo handling facilities ISO)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 13

    Port of Virginia Environmental Commitments The Port of Virginia is the ?rst and only major port on the East Coast to have all its cargo handling facilities ISO 14001 Certi?ed for Environmental Management The James River Barge Line service utilizes tugboats powered by low emission engines reducing emissions

  • MN Jul-19#59 PRODUCTS
Beele’s SLIPSIL XL-120 Sealing 
Plugs Deliver)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 59

    PRODUCTS Beele’s SLIPSIL XL-120 Sealing Plugs Deliver Fire Safety Beele Engineering recently acquired the MED certi? cate for its SLIPSIL XL-120 plugs, which means they are CE certi? ed in accordance with the Marine Equipment Directive 2014/90/EU. The certi? cate relates to the SLIPSIL XL-120

  • MN Jul-19#52 . The fully-classed CTV 
vessel, carrying 20 passengers, plus)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 52

    for East Coast conditions with maneu- verability, performance and redundancy in mind while reaching a top speed of 28 knots. The fully-classed CTV vessel, carrying 20 passengers, plus 4 crew, will be delivered early next year and is under construction, with the second earmarked for 2020. The endangered North

  • MN Jul-19#51 VESSELS
Lake Assault Fireboat Now on Duty in Georgia)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 51

    VESSELS Lake Assault Fireboat Now on Duty in Georgia vides ? re suppression and emergency response services. The craft can quickly transport water into a network of stand- pipes located along the shoreline to supply lake water for ground-based ? re? ghting operations. Moreover, its deck- mounted

  • MN Jul-19#46  a large open deck which could carry oversized equip- ways)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 46

    utilized. It was also better designed for the tasks ture, understanding a completely new industry is not al- with a large open deck which could carry oversized equip- ways the easiest of tasks. The offshore wind market, devel- ment. Because of these assets, three sister vessels were al- opment timelines

  • MN Jul-19#41  of,” said Detrafford. “I don’t care how 
FMT brings everyone)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 41

    – with- edge to get by, we freshen them up to prepare for situations out breaking the towboat. they couldn’t get out of,” said Detrafford. “I don’t care how FMT brings everyone to simulator training annually, old you are, you learn something new every day. It is not a all pilots, captains and mates

  • MN Jul-19#39  follow the draft policy letter. Carpenter said that VIDA implementat)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 39

    public comment processes, e.g., VIDA listening session at the US Merchant Marine Academy. the 60-day window that will follow the draft policy letter. Carpenter said that VIDA implementation offers the Nichols writes, “Ballast water is a policy that has in many Coast Guard and EPA a chance to prioritize

  • MN Jul-19#23  2018 lists over  tainer ships carry hundreds of individ-)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 23

    duction would be sizable. oped an EAL response. The EPA VGP oretically available. For example, con- reporting database for 2018 lists over tainer ships carry hundreds of individ- K ’ R LÜBER S OLE 200,000 vessels with 95,000 EAL ap- ual refrigerated containers each with its An example from Klüber’s contri- pli