Maritime Transportation Sys

  • ALK Technologies, Inc. and Midland Enterprises have created a new Barge Management System (BMS) to help Midland increase efficiency and competitiveness.

    Using the Intranet to tightly integrate communications, business, and systems processes on an enterprisewide basis, BMS offers a palette of ecommerce functions. Ideas for the sys- tem were solicited from Midland departments including sales, finance, transportation, operations, and information systems. Phase II, constituting the detailed design, was completed in early 2000 and Phase III, encompassing delivery and installation, was completed in June 2001.

    Two primary business goals of BMS are to improve equipment utilization and manage yield potential by analyzing new requests for service. In past years, most barge transportation services operated on long-term contracts with welldefined traffic patterns.

    However, recent market changes are causing complex changes, inducing barge companies to re-examine the way they do business.

    "Not only has there been an increase in short-term requests for service," said David Seneko, ALK vice president, "but Midland Enterprises is also juggling more customer requests for specific types of equipment. There is a need to know specifically what equipment is available in what location at what time before Midland decides if it makes sense to accept a new order. If the company were to accept new business and then had to move empty equipment over long distances to fulfill it, for example, the yield would not be maximized and existing service might be compromised." BMS allows Midland to match customer orders with available equipment at specific locations over a 90-day planning horizon. The system reduces barge cycle times by highlighting idle equipment awaiting re-assignment and curtails detention periods for loading and unloading by providing equipment on a just-in-time basis. "Our customers need a transportation partner with expertise, flexibility, innovation and commitment," says Nick Lonnemann, vice president, transportation services at Midland Enterprises. "Our goal is to deliver their commodities safely and expeditiously, and our new Barge Management System will help us meet that goal every time." Midland Enterprises commenced business as The Ohio River Company more than 75 years ago and currently operates 2,400 barges over more than 7,000 miles of America's inland waterways.

    Carrying coal, grain, iron, steel ores, and other dry bulk commodities, Midland offers an integrated array of transportation-related services.

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  • The Maritime Administration has approved in principle an application for a Title XI guarantee to aid in financing the construction of the Chemical Pioneer, a 35,000- deadweight-ton chemical carrier being built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Va. The approved guarantee

  • Gerald A. Motta has been named vice president of operations for Waterway Communications System, Inc., by its president, Richard A. Baker. Waterway Communications System, Inc., Jeffersonville, Ind., is responsible for the development of Watercom, a new directdial telephone service for the marine indus

  • levels. Inert Gas Systems are universally recognized as the safest method of preventing explosions on board oil tankers. IMCO (International Maritime Carriers Organization) recommends that Inert Gas Systems 'be installed on all ore/oil, LN'G and crude oil carriers above a specified size. Responding

  • The Maritime Administration (MarAd) announced its participation in the Ad-Hoc Working Group on Security for the Maritime Transportation Committee (MTC) at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris. Government and industry leaders will be open and encourage an international

  • Secretary of Transportation Drew Lewis announced recently an Administration plan to transfer the Maritime Administration from the Department of Commerce to the Department of Transportation. "The transfer is the first step in carrying out President Reagan's commitment to revitalization of the U.S.

  • Thomas V. Van Dawark, vice president and general manager of Foss Alaska Line, Seattle, Wash., has been named president, Dillingham Maritime-Ocean Transportation Services Division. The announcement was made by David B. Ballash, Dillingham group vice president-maritime. The Ocean T r a n s p o r t a

  • vice president and general manager of Dillingham Shipyard operations. The promotion was announced by Harold Malterre, president, Dillingham Maritime-Pacific Division. Mr. Swanson, f o r m e r l y f i r st deputy director for the State of Hawaii's Department of Transportation, joined Dillingham

  • H.R. 3983, the "Maritime Transportation Antiterrorism Act of 2002," was passed by the House Transportation and Infrastructure (T & I) Committee on March 20. The legislation was introduced by the bipartisan leadership of the Transportation Committee, including: Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska), Chairman

  • Like so many areas of our economy since the terrorist attacks of September 11, the port and maritime areas of the United States are being scrutinized for vulnerability to terrorism. Catastrophic scenarios are all too easy to imagine, and the threats can come from so many directions. To illustrate the

  • MH Systems, Inc., Del Mar, Calif., developer of the American Underpressure System called Spillstop, has performed probabilistic outflow analysis and cost analysis of the system. The system might prove to be a cost-effective interim solution for existing tankers to prevent or reduce the outflow of

  • Germany's Blohm + Voss Repair GmbH (B+V) signed a contract with Norway's Red Band AS. Oslo, for the repair and extensive alteration work onboard the 28,670-grt passenger ship Black Watch. The 1972-built vessel will arrive at B+V during April 2005, the first time she has visited the yard since November

  • MR Jul-19#64  . . . . . . .Kongsberg Maritime . . . . . . . . . . )
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    . .www.hydratechllc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(513) 827-9169 9 . . . . . . .Kongsberg Maritime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.km.kongsberg.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • MR Jul-19#58  convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Jul-19#56  Speed Through Water OSM Maritime’s OSM ON
Miros launched)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    P PRODUCTS NEW FROM NORSHIPPING MIROS Speed Through Water OSM Maritime’s OSM ON Miros launched Miros Speed Through Water, a OSM Maritime dry-mounted, radar-based system. “Access to ac- introduces OSM curate speed through water data will enable im- ON, which uses provements in the application of ship

  • MR Jul-19#55  
for digital adoption in the maritime industry, 
given the)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    Vessel Insight Kongsberg unveiled Vessel Insight, a subscrip- tion-based service addressing the key challenges for digital adoption in the maritime industry, given the complex and customized integration of systems and equipment on board, which renders standardization challenging. Accessing

  • MR Jul-19#54 , monitoring and the maritime Internet of 
tomatically)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    , and and integrated solutions portfolio with focus on Genset More Spark provides at all times the latest charts and data au- control, monitoring and the maritime Internet of tomatically. In addition, it enables onshore ? eet Responding to the trend for more electrical power Things (IoT). The all-new Series

  • MR Jul-19#53 ?  ed from a  tension from maritime stakeholders at- algorithms)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 53

    was a palpable by arti? cial intelligence and underlying data infrastructure”, Kongsberg Vessel Each vessel design was modi? ed from a tension from maritime stakeholders at- algorithms. Insight is a combination of hardware baseline concept that could run on HFO tending the Nor-Shipping conference To

  • MR Jul-19#52  
national strategy for its maritime commons. “The key 
object)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    the announcement. Standing next to Kingo on-stage, Solberg explained how the strategy document was aligned with Norway’s national strategy for its maritime commons. “The key object for Norway’s ocean strategy is to promote sus- tainable economic growth through responsible man- agement. We do that because

  • MR Jul-19#51   ing the ?  rst autonomous maritime trans- and strategies)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    of Shipping (ABS) to announce plans erator could manage up to “six or seven tional expenditure savings over the life ing the ? rst autonomous maritime trans- and strategies related to sustainable ships depending on where they are in of the vessel. port system by 2025”. ocean use, marine emissions

  • MR Jul-19#50  to describe 
As one Norwegian maritime executive  developing)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    and friends. following during the unveiling. “We are Two noteworthy events featuring ma- is a Norwegian adjective used to describe As one Norwegian maritime executive developing this control station for the rine automation included the unveil- situations that give a feeling of comfort, quipped over

  • MR Jul-19#48  to gather a super-
48     Maritime Reporter & Engineering)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    drones that use thermography to detect hidden wind blade damage. tor moves from blade to blade snapping ment makes it possible to gather a super- 48 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • JULY 2019 MR #7 (42-49).indd 48 7/5/2019 9:33:31 A

  • MR Jul-19#47  
in importance for the global maritime industry. As with 
any)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    compared to 2008 and eventually fully eliminate harmful emissions, the matter of emission reduction has leapt to the fore in importance for the global maritime industry. As with any tech evolution, challenges persist. “Design chal- lenges are further development of fuel system design including further involvemen

  • MR Jul-19#46 . I 
reduce emissions from the maritime in- start using this)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    before this happens and the ? rst vessels ef? cient,” said de Vries, the research scope and did a preliminary research. I reduce emissions from the maritime in- start using this. Ship last 25 years so lead. “However, it does have practical aligned my master thesis with this and dustry. As with other

  • MR Jul-19#45  lique?  ed 
hydrogen by Moss 
Maritime, Wilhelmsen 
Ship Management)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    T TECH FILES FUTURE FUELS Rendering of a bulk carrier for the trans- portation of lique? ed hydrogen by Moss Maritime, Wilhelmsen Ship Management, Equinor, and DNV-GL. Photo credit: Moss Maritime. fjords, Svalbard, the austere arctic island ing capability. CAPEX and OPEX” said Mr. Skogan. A

  • MR Jul-19#44  number of grants to leading 
maritime companies to conduct)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    to seriously consider hydro- gen for newly built vessels. As a bold ? rst step, the country of Norway has provided a number of grants to leading maritime companies to conduct feasibil- ity studies into various aspects of this emerging technology sector. Central to Per A. Brinchmann (left), this discussion

  • MR Jul-19#43  
at AGCS. 
increased in 2018  maritime sector is a 
to more)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    and cost of fuel,” says Captain Andrew Kinsey, Senior Marine Risk Consultant Piracy incidents technology in the at AGCS. increased in 2018 maritime sector is a to more than 200 – and positive for safety and Nigeria is now the top global claims, a necessary evolu- hotspot. tion to effectively

  • MR Jul-19#42 , 
NEW DANGERS EMERGE
As the maritime industry digests a host)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    N BY THE NUMBERS SHIPPING LOSSES DROP, NEW DANGERS EMERGE As the maritime industry digests a host Emissions Compliance of new emission and fuel regulations, in On the regulatory side, emissions com- tandem with a fast-evolving technologi- pliance, most immediately in regards to cal evolution that

  • MR Jul-19#40  they are contributing to the maritime 
challenges of the nation)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 40

    able to talk the National Security Agency (NSA) as easily as we do the local sheriff, and we can make them all feel that they are contributing to the maritime challenges of the nation.” ICEBREAKERS “We have the 6-3-1 strategy (to acquire them). We’re getting the one, we have the funding and we’re off

  • MR Jul-19#39  commerce on the 
structure, maritime infrastructure and the)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 39

    forward thinking.” when you talk about investment in infra- barges traveling from up-river states to slow the ef? ciency of commerce on the structure, maritime infrastructure and the blue water ships anchored in the river, waterways and increase the risk of mari- Coast Guard need to be a part of that con-

  • MR Jul-19#38  U.S. 
SHIPBUILDING 
ast month Maritime Reporter  of shoreline)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    on the robust and diverse business in and around the lower Mississippi River. Photo: Greg Trauthwein ADMIRAL SCHULTZ ON U.S. SHIPBUILDING ast month Maritime Reporter of shoreline, 25,000 miles of navigable maritime corridor – is determined to in- & Engineering News was in- channels, 361 ports, 50,000

  • MR Jul-19#36 .
By Greg Trauthwein
36     Maritime Reporter & Engineering)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    annually. But the need for infrastruc- ture investment and historically high waters threaten the ef? ciency of the system. By Greg Trauthwein 36 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • JULY 2019 MR #7 (34-41).indd 36 7/5/2019 9:05:52 A

  • MR Jul-19#35 Photo: Kongsberg
Photo: Hamburg Messe and Congress
Photo:)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 35

    Photo: Kongsberg Photo: Hamburg Messe and Congress Photo: Hamburg Messe and Congress LAS requirements. The main objective ing even more on well-known designers. Lloyd Cruises which put to sea recently, Pictured from the Left: is to minimize the use of readily ? am- This ship will complete a journey we

  • MR Jul-19#34  to the IMO’s SO-
34     Maritime Reporter & Engineering)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    designers always depend Finding competent project partners is senses. This was a great piece of advice I ship: They are subject to the IMO’s SO- 34 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • JULY 2019 MR #7 (34-41).indd 34 7/5/2019 8:59:07 A

  • MR Jul-19#32  designers of cruise 
32     Maritime Reporter & Engineering)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    , inti- ship.’ door to a few key ? nancial interest part- had a similar situation in the late 1990s, mate experience,” as designers of cruise 32 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • JULY 2019 MR #7 (26-33).indd 32 7/3/2019 9:20:49 A

  • MR Jul-19#31 me. He was a prominent maritime voice  archives of maritime)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 31

    me. He was a prominent maritime voice archives of maritime photography of the shoff classic gaff rigged sloop. cation when he is not planning an incred- of commercial ? shermen for more than Great Lakes region, working ? shermen “The Herreshoff has one lunger Fary- ible voyage and cultural experience