Stainless Steel Short Chains

  • As did many readers of this article, I grew up in a coastal community, with the relaxing sounds of waves rolling over the rocks and on the seashore helping me drift to sleep at night. While soothing, the oceans also generate enormous amounts energy, still largely untapped.  
    Used car and truck tires are plentiful and cheap, and they also have excellent water and mechanical resistance properties. Is there a way that recycled tires can be utilized in the conversion of wave energy to cheap electricity? I believe so.
    As the world continues to burn fossil fuel, supplies will begin to run low.  At the same time, the supply of discarded tires grows higher, piles that present a significant fire risk and form a breeding  ground for mosquitos.  While there has been a movement to ween ourselves from fossil fuels, wind and thermal energy are still relatively costly sources.
    In 2008, the author began to build a 1/20th scaled model of a floating platform to help harness wave energy.  The idea comes from the common paddle used to propel a boat forward.  If we could position a paddle (Figure 1) in the path of the wave and maintain it in that approximate position relative to the fluctuating water level; would it then be possible to have the wave move the paddle? A structure needed to be built to hold the paddle in place.
    In the context of wave energy conversion, the concept of using recycled tires to produce electricity may be an innovative approach. Conditions for the structure (shown in Figure 2) and the overall project strive to meet the following requirements:

    Economically feasible
    Ensure livelihood of people who depend on the ocean
    Respect the ocean
    Do no harm to creatures in the ocean
    Allow water to flow relatively unrestricted
    Be heavy enough to be stable in the water
    Strong enough to protect the moving blades and survive
    Have sufficient buoyancy force
    Minimal risk of sinking or being destroyed by the ocean

    A cubical module measuring 20 cubic feet made of welded 18 inch diam. aluminum tubes and fitted with recycled tires (Figure 2). The tubes are individually sealed and the tires are filled with water resistant foam. An axle is suspended in the center of the cube and supported by stainless steel roller bearings.  A turbine is formed by welding four backward large blades to the axle called “reverse wave paddles.”  The paddles are moved by the waves going forward towards the shore and possibly during the return undercurrent wave cycle.  A large gear is rotated slowly around at the speed of the waves and the rotation is conveyed to a gearbox mounted on a platform above water level. The gearbox is connected to an electrical generator to produce electricity for use on the float and with large scale deployment, cables can carry electricity to the shore.
    The configuration described above can be easily and inexpensively built.  The author maintains that the structure has minimal risk of sinking because each component is a floatation device.  It is designed to be reliable in the water because it is mostly synthetic rubber and aluminum construction. The combination of sealed aluminum tubes and water resistant foam filled used tires (Figure 3) is compatible with salt water, inexpensive, and has high mechanical resistance. The sealed tubes and foam filled tires together provide strong buoyancy force. Four stabilizer water tanks are mounted on four corners of the float to adjust the position of the rotating blades relative to the water level.  When heavy weights are added water can be released from the tanks to return float to desired position.  Alternating modules are used to direct and increase wave energy into the active modules.  Modules are connected together via stainless steel short chains, leaving some flexibility to float relative to each other.  When several modules are connected they form a continuous multifunctional platform.  Wind turbines and other structures can be mounted on the upper deck of the platform (Figure 4).
    For test purposes, nine units should be deployed to evaluate all parameters of the modules including functionality, reliability, efficiency, anchoring, cost, maintenance, survivability, effect on sea life and other factors. Because material costs are competitive, construction of nearly identical units can provide economy of scale, and because of the versatility and the flexibility of the platform; cost of electricity from wave and wind energy can be extremely competitive.
    Wind turbines can be installed on the top deck, as ocean winds are a valuable and reliable source of clean energy.  Offshore coastal areas with high wind potential may be able to utilize the large surface areas of the platform to separate the wind storms form the warm ocean surface water on which they feed. 
    The ideal location is a function of several factors:
    •    Close to islands or near-shore communities which depend on fossil fuel for generating electricity
    •    Away from areas normally used for recreation
    •    Close to areas with established electrical transmission lines
    •    At a distance from shore where surface waves and undercurrent could be utilized.
    •    In locations not frequently used for fishing, crabbing and other related activities
    •    In areas with minimal interference with marine traffic.

     

    (As published in the May 2014 edition of Marine Technology Reporter - http://www.marinetechnologynews.com/Magazine)

  • , protected from line fluid errosion and corrosion. Mueller Steam Specialty Duplex Strainers are available from stock in cast iron, carbon steel, stainless steel and bronze, all with trim materials appropriately matched to the body material. Special materials, baskets and coatings are available on

  • A special jack shaft and mechanical clutch assembly was chosen for accessability and simplicity of operation. All exposed shafting is constructed of stainless steel, and every bearing is of the sealed type. The motor and control are both totally enclosed units to prevent rust and corrosion on electrical con

  • positioning buoys during at-sea astern fueling operations—the preferred fueling mode of NATO countries. The buoys will be manufactured utilizing all stainless steel hardware and Interade's standard buoy construction of inner foam combination of rigid plus semi-flexible foams for positive buoyancy and

  • . The fairlead drive is designed to accommodate use of different wire sizes with minimal modification. Extensive use is made throughout the winch of stainless-steel fairlead sheaves, roller chains, fasteners and fittings, along with an inorganic zinc coating system to insure minimum maintenance. For

  • lies completely flat when deflated allowing for easy cleaning and storage. The individual air chambers provide high integrity. RO-BOOM is fitted with stainless steel fittings and a hot galvanized ballast/tension chain. Stainless steel hinge connectors are fitted as standard. Circle 3 8 on R e a d e r

  • Lister Chain & Forge Inc., a recently incorporated U.S. company, associated with 78-year-old Canadian chain-making and steel forging concern Lister Bolt & Chain, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., recently announced it would commence the manufacture of ship anchor chain in the U.S. by early April 1989. Located

  • storage reel is designed and engineered to survive in harsh salt water conditions and to provide years of reliable service with its large wire capacity, stainless steel tension brake, bolt-down mount and protective cover. With the bolt-down mounting design this system can be simply switched from barge to barge

  • and stresses. Customers can choose to have their fenders made with integral swivel end fittings, which are constructed of high quality stainless steel — or hot dipped galvanized steel. The purpose of these fittings is to provide a safe and permanent end fitting for the fender and a fixed

  • . A major job on the USCGC Farallon, the first 110-foot cutter of this class built, was changing the hydraulic steering piping system from steel to stainless steel throughout the whole vessel. Extensive mast maintenance, renewal of some shell plating, extensive inspections of rudders, shafting and

  • engines rated at 1,125 horsepower at 1,225 revolutions per minute, and has a free-running speed of approximately 12 knots. She swings two stainless-steel four-bladed propellers with a diameter each of 84 inches on ABS Grade 2, 9-inchdiameter forged-steel propeller shafts. Auxiliary equipment

  • This year marks the 85th anniversary of Baldt Inc. of Chester, Pa., a leading supplier of anchors, chains, related marine hardware, and mooring release systems. The company evolved over the years from a manufacturer of chain and anchors, whose credits include supplying the first WWII Liberty ship

  • MR Nov-19#83 .”  Kotug contacted Tug-
Stainless-steel liner. The system)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    in its line, you get really Level Wind Carriage is fabricated with a high peak loads on the gear box in the traditional winch.” Kotug contacted Tug- Stainless-steel liner. The system also in- pins to help develop a solution, which came up with the Modular Caliper Escort cludes JonRie’s Render/Recover blocks

  • MR Nov-19#81 V
VESSELS 
and the 18th built as part of the teaming  USS)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 81

    V VESSELS and the 18th built as part of the teaming USS Delaware (BB 28), which was de- 2013. The submarine was christened by VLCC with New SOx agreement with General Dynamics Elec- livered by Newport News in 1910. Jill Biden, the former Second Lady of Scrubber Delivered tric Boat. More than 10

  • MR Nov-19#79 .5:1 reduction ratio driving stainless steel shafts and 
bronze)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 79

    by two 560 kW 6135SFM85 John Deere main engines for a speed of 20 knots. Reduction gears will be Reintjes WAF 244 with 2.5:1 reduction ratio driving stainless steel shafts and bronze propellers. Engines are easily removed from ves- sel via matching hatches in main deck and overhead in- house top. Self-propelled

  • MR Nov-19#76 M
MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE
Crew Care: Managing Mariner)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 76

    M MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE Crew Care: Managing Mariner Medical Care By Joe Keefe he competent authority shall as the population on shore enjoys. But, the embarking any mariner, a trusted 2012. There are several key aspects to require that, prior to begin- that’s not always the case. In case of

  • MR Nov-19#72 E
EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS
Scrubbers: A 360-degree)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 72

    E EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS Scrubbers: A 360-degree solution for shipowners and the environment By Scott Poulter, founder and CEO, Paci? c Green Technologies s part of the IMO’s com- vessel to LNG would be prohibitively ies being built are super-modern and will The second compelling reason to in- mitme

  • MR Nov-19#65 VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE,)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 65

    VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE, LLOYD’S REGISTER what we believe will be prototype ves- LR research suggests that the cheap- as weather routing but these can only Digitalization has also enabled LR to sels, contracted and constructed in the est zero carbon fuels are going to be go

  • MR Nov-19#63 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
for installation)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry.

  • MR Nov-19#61 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
110MW Changhua wind)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET 110MW Changhua wind farm in 2020. Both wind farms are currently under construction.” Esteyo’s ELICAN Seajacks concept. UK-based Seajacks has been operating in the off- Source: ALE shore wind business since 2006. Since then, it’s built the Kraken, Leviathan, Hydra

  • MR Nov-19#56 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
Mrs. Saltkjel stated)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING Mrs. Saltkjel stated, “We are careful not but choose not to follow the regulations In order to ensure that EU SSR and HKC are making procedures that ? t the actual to use the words ‘certifying’ or ‘validat- when they are not being externally moni- are adhered to

  • MR Nov-19#40 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
Photos: ZF/Martin)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 40

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY Photos: ZF/Martin Meissner Career development. Opportunity and investing in the Statistics.” In short it says is you can make statistics say boats at the 11:30 watch change so that we can have as people. And we have gone way out of our way to put whatever you want.

  • MR Nov-19#30 WORKBOATS THE OSV MARKET
CAROLYN CHOUEST: 
Edison Chouest)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    WORKBOATS THE OSV MARKET CAROLYN CHOUEST: Edison Chouest vessel working Paci? c waters. he fate of Offshore Service oil, slightly higher (with temporary (but slight) jit- for an uptick in 2020 and 2021 with Photos: Iain Cameron Vessels (OSVs) is, natural- nearby at around $60/ ters as an Iranian

  • MR Nov-19#26 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
Equinor Invests in)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND Equinor Invests in Solar & Wind Energy in Brazil By Claudio Paschoa Scatec Solar and Equinor have ? rst major solar plant in Brazil in commercial operation. Equinor illustration of Hywind offshore wind farm in shallow waters off Scotland. Photo: Equinor ew technologi

  • MR Nov-19#24 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
“The US needs to)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND “The US needs to develop a work- force from scratch,” noting that a mas- sive campaign was undertaken in the UK, something that needs to start now in the United States. Laura Smith, USA Director for Atlas Professionals from renewable energy? NJ wants to de- to the

  • MR Nov-19#22 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
Public Of?  cials Face)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 22

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND Public Of? cials Face Detailed Decisions – needed sooner, not later… AOT is working to develop a new port, speci? cally con? gured to serve Atlantic Ocean wind projects, on 30 acres along the Arthur Kill tidal strait between Staten Island and New Jersey. Boone Davis

  • MR Nov-19#16 D
DESIGN: BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD
Rik van Hemmen is the)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    D DESIGN: BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD Rik van Hemmen is the President of Martin & Ottaway, a marine consulting ? rm that specializes in the resolution of technical, operational and ? nancial issues in maritime. By training he is an Aerospace and Ocean engineer and has spent the majority of his career in

  • MR Nov-19#12 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com The Internet of Maritime Things he Internet of Maritime

  • MN Nov-19#86 ech file
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    November 2019 - Marine News page: 86

    ech file T MacGregor’s MacGregor’s Fiber-rope Fiber-rope Crane for Crane for Offshore Offshore MarketsMarkets acGregor, part of Cargotec, has completed the construction of FibreTrac, the ? rst ? ber-rope off- shore crane to enter the market. The crane’s full M potential is being validated and its

  • MN Nov-19#78 TECHNOLOGY
“... there are still maritime companies out)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 78

    TECHNOLOGY “... there are still maritime companies out there still working within a traditional framework of manual processes which are becoming less relevant, practicable and competitive with every passing day. As the industry moves inexorably towards integration and automation in everything from supply

  • MN Nov-19#77 time transformation, where new technology and digital)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 77

    time transformation, where new technology and digital solutions enable a move towards smarter, more ef? cient, safer and greener operations. From MAN’s perspective, digitalization supports its commitment to help its customers increase the safety, re- liability and predictability of their individual

  • MN Nov-19#76 TECHNOLOGY
Digital 
Developments 
Continue 
Apace in the)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 76

    TECHNOLOGY Digital Developments Continue Apace in the Workboat Space Sustainable, energy-ef? cient working practices and environmental regulatory compliance are among the hot-button topics driving the spread of maritime digitalization. By Vigleik Takle, Senior Vice President – Maritime Digital

  • MN Nov-19#75 OFFSHORE WIND
INVESTING FOR THE FUTURE mand for new boat)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 75

    OFFSHORE WIND INVESTING FOR THE FUTURE mand for new boat construction and covered,” said Marcia Blount. “But While any shipyard requires con- repair, caused the Blounts to step back for the new aluminum vessels (i.e. tinual investment, Blount Boats has and evaluate how to best utilize their offshore

  • MN Nov-19#74 OFFSHORE WIND
Blount Boats also completed an 85-ft.)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 74

    OFFSHORE WIND Blount Boats also completed an 85-ft., triple-screw alu- minum ferry boat, Isle of Fire for Fire Island Ferries – the 10th vessel built for Fire Island Ferries by Blount Boats – that was delivered on June 19, 2019 and will service 386 passengers between Bay Shore and Fire Island on Great

  • MN Nov-19#68 ech file
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“There are 440 alarms connected to each 
engine.)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 68

    ech file T “There are 440 alarms connected to each engine. For 20 of these, the alarm is a signal for us not to start the engine. These alerts go straight to vessel managers’ mobile phones so that checks can be carried out before the vessel leaves the harbor – and, crucially, this enables us to act

  • MN Nov-19#14 INSIGHTS
Fernstrum set the standard in marine cooling)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS Fernstrum set the standard in marine cooling systems over 65 years ago, building a reputation focused on in- novation. Indeed, the ? rm is arguably in a class by itself when it comes to discussing any marine OEM market vendors. This month, listen in as Sean Fernstrum weighs in on how his ? rm