Uk Environment Agency

  • As of July 1, 2003, there were approximately 29,000 commercial self-propelled ocean-going ships worldwide in excess of 1.000 gross tons each. Of these, just over 400 are U.S. Hag. In addition, there are approximately 3,000 U.S. barges of over 1,000 gross tons each. Approximately 25% of these ships and barges are more than 20 years old and will be taken out of service in the near future. The vast majority of the ships and barges taken out of service will be recycled (scrapped). Exactly when a ship is taken out of service is dependent upon a variety of factors, the most important being its maintenance costs and its current charter rate. Thus, the number of ships being offered for recycling can and does gyrate widely over time.

    There is growing realization that ships (and, to a lesser extent, barges) frequently contain hazardous materials. These materials may become hazardous wastes when a ship or barge is to be recycled.

    Ship recycling in the United States and many other countries in the developed world is subject to environment controls.

    Such recycling in lesser developed nations is not currently regulated to the same extent.

    Many nations are party to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal.

    This Convention is intended to prevent hazardous wastes from being transported to another country for disposal unless the receiving country has provided knowing consent to such action. Ships being transferred from one party state for recycling in another party state appear to come within the Convention, although there is some uncertainty in this regard.

    While the United States is not party to the Basel Convention, it has adopted domestic legislation having the same impact. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provides, in pertinent part, that hazardous waste may not be exported from the United States unless various conditions are met. The person who intends to export the hazardous waste must provide written notification to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The notification must contain the name and address of the exporter, the types and quantities of hazardous waste to be exported, the date of the planned exportation, the port of entry at destination, the method of transport.

    the name and address of the ultimate disposal facility, and the names of any transit countries through which the hazardous waste will be sent.

    The United States is party to several international agreements concerning international trade in hazardous waste.

    The primary agreement is among member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). These agreements share the basic principles of notification by the exporter to the government of the exporting country, government- to-government notification to the receiving country, and receiving country consent to the shipment.

    More broadly, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is developing guidelines on ship recycling that may lead to mandatory requirements for an inventory of hazardous material on the ship. This inventory would be initiated during construction and continue to be maintained until the ship is recycled.

    At the same time, the International Labor Organization (ILO) is developing guidelines for ship-breaking. These standards would address working and environmental conditions at locations where ships are to be recycled.

    The EPA has specifically examined the ship scrapping and recycling industry.

    The agency has identified a variety of hazardous wastes commonly associated with ships being scrapped or recycled.

    These hazardous wastes include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). asbestos, heavy metals, pesticides, and waste oils.

    These hazardous wastes must either be removed from the ship prior to export or the consent of both the EPA and the receiving country must be obtained before a ship can be exported from the United States for recycling in a foreign country. The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), in conjunction with other maritime organizations, developed the "Industry Code of Practice on Ship Recycling." This Code provides that, when a ship is to be sold for recycling, the owner will inventory the potentially hazardous materials on board and take steps to minimize those materials before the ship is delivered for recycling. The Code also contains a list of potentially hazardous and toxic materials frequently found on ships.

    The EPA restrictions on export of ships for recycling have been applied to government ships. The Maritime Administration (MARAD) encountered various obstacles and added expense in disposing of obsolete vessels from the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF). After MARAD awarded a contract for the recycling of 15 NDRF ships at a facility in the United Kingdom, suit was brought by several environmental advocacy groups to block the exportation. The complaint alleged a number of violations of law, including the failure to conduct an environmental assessment and the failure to obtain an exemption from the EPA for the export of PCB for disposal.

    The trial court allowed the export of four obsolete MARAD ships as a Congressionally-approved pilot program, but has granted a temporary restraining order against export of any further vessels. The major finding of the court in prohibiting further vessel exports is the apparent violation of the ban on export of PCB without an EPA exemption. Subsequently, the UK Environment Agency withdrew approval for the ships to be recycled, noting that the contractor had not obtained permission to expand its facility to perform such work. The four NDRF ships may be returned to the United States in the spring, unless the matter can be sorted out.

    As important as the litigation surrounding the export for recycling of the obsolete MARAD vessels is the contract that MARAD awarded for this disposal.

    Whereas the traditional arrangement for recycling of ships involves the sale of the ship for its so-called scrap value, the MARAD arrangement provided for MARAD to pay the contractor $14.8 million for removal and recycling of 15 ships. The high visibility of these exports and the government status of the ships were, no doubt, major factors in this unique arrangement. This payment for recycling of ships, though, alters the traditional view that ships always retain a certain minimal value (the value of the steel and related material in the hull).

    The French Government is involved in a similar controversy regarding efforts to recycle the retired aircraft carrier Clemenceau. The ship apparently contains over 200 tons of asbestos. Efforts to have the ship recycled in Turkey met with protests and the ship has been returned to France for removal of the asbestos and any other hazardous waste.

    Lest anyone think this problem is exclusive to government vessels, your attention is invited to the chemical tanker Sandrien. This ship, suspected of having onboard asbestos and various hazardous chemicals, has been tied up the Netherlands since 2001. The owners have been unable to obtain clearance from the Dutch government to send the ship for recycling in India because the government is requiring full compliance with the Basel Convention.

    Due in large part to heightened environmental concerns and new apprehensions about the safety and health of employees of ship recyclers, we may be approaching the day when owners of both government vessels and regular commercial ships will regularly pay to have their ships recycled.

    Minimalization and monitoring of hazardous materials on ships is highly recommended.

  • Provincial Governments of South Holland, Holland The Tanker Assimi—A Case History Terence M. Hayes, International Maritime Organization, London, England, UK Management of the Uniacke G-72 Incident S.D. Gill, Canada Oil and Gas Lands Administration, Ottawa, Canada; C.A. Bonke, Shell Canada Resources, Calgary

  • Atlantic Container Line (ACL) recently commenced operations in Great Britain with a new company, Atlantic Container Line Agencies (UK) Ltd. The new operation, based in Liverpool, with offices also in London and Glasgow, takes over agency responsibility from Cunard Ellerman. "This is a further

  • Veritas for STCW95 training. Specific training courses are also approved to Flag State standard, which in the case of Lairdside Maritime Center is the UK MCA (Maritime and Coastguard Agency). Circle 8 on Reader Service Card www.maritimereporterinfo.co

  • take steps to raise the share of energy consumption produced from renewable resources to 20% by 2020.  Currently there are huge developments taking place in UK waters and by 2020 there will be around 10GW installed providing 8-10% of the UK’s annual electricity requirements.” While investment in the U.K. Navy

  • At a hearing at Truro Magistrates Court, the owner of a tanker paid a total of $36,000 in fines and costs after pleading guilty to a breach of U.K. maritime pollution legislation. On February 25, 2012 a satellite operated by European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) detected a ship trailing a slick in the

  • A new 14m catamaran was delivered to coastal survey specialists Osiris Projects by Blyth Workcats. The new boat, named Proteus of Liverpool, was custom-built at the Blyth Workcats yard on Canvey Island, U.K., to provide a fast yet stable and comfortable working platform for coastal survey work. The boat has

  • to enhance the safety of their personnel and equipment while also improving the bottom lines of their projects. With this goal in mind, MG3 Survey UK Limited has turned to Earth observation satellites flying hundreds of miles overhead to get a better idea of what obstacles lay beneath the waves in

  • Systems have IMO Type Approval for capacity from 60 to 6000 cu. m./hr., and a Type Approval Certificate has been issued by Lloyd’s Register on behalf of the UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency to confirm compliance with Guidelines contained in IMO resolution MEPC.174(58).  Other certifications include ABS, Dutch

  • Since the time of the Romans, the evolution and development of the maritime sector has been of vital importance to Britain's commercial and economic interests. Early links were established with trading partners worldwide, links that endure today — particularly in our relations with the U.S. As

  • A little more than a year ago, 40 global research and defense companies met to discuss how unmanned systems could be used by the world’s armies, air forces and navies in the defense systems of the future. This led to the British Royal Navy staging its first ‘robot wars’ last fall to give companies the

  • and to specification. ASV has supplied over 30 different Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USV) for a wide range of tasks.  Its products are in service with the UK MoD, government organizations, defense primes and several navies and businesses around the world.  ASV has also carried out specialist military research

  • MN Jun-19#28 , a revolutionary sys- for the UK, Ireland and Channel Is-)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    yacht sectors “The OXE features Low Speed manager of Proteum and distributor alike, the OXE outboard has some- Control (LSC), a revolutionary sys- for the UK, Ireland and Channel Is- thing for everyone. tem that enables unprecedented con- lands. “That’s a heavy boat, but we’re trol while mooring and low speed

  • MN Jun-19#26 PROPULSION
and a slimmer submerged module. The gearbox and)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    PROPULSION and a slimmer submerged module. The gearbox and clutch ert Karlssen, Cimco test pilot and technician. system are continuously water-cooled which means that you The gear box makes it possible for the operator to change can use the trolling function without time limit,” said Rob- from left hand

  • MN Jun-19#24 PROPULSION
T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
Credit:)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#22 COLUMN OP/ED
?  re?  ghting is not a pro?  table or)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    COLUMN OP/ED ? re? ghting is not a pro? table or sustainable venture. For determine that marine ? re? ghting services require dedi- example, to meet the regulatory standards ASA companies cated assets in contrast to vessels of opportunity currently have pre-positioned marine ? re? ghting equipment

  • MN Jun-19#16  military 
from Cox Powertrain’s UK headquarters, which is based)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    North American expansion plans. The CXO300 will initially be assembled and distributed Which sector – commercial workboat or military from Cox Powertrain’s UK headquarters, which is based small littoral craft – will bene? t the most, and which at Shoreham Airport on the South Coast of England. Last was

  • MN Jun-19#14  from the US Government 
and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD))
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

  • MN Jun-19#2 CONTENTS
MarineNews  June 2019  •  Volume 30   Number)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CONTENTS MarineNews June 2019 • Volume 30 Number 6 INSIGHTS 14 Joel Reid Global Sales Director, COX Powertrain OP/ED 20 A Reassessment of the U.S. Marine Salvage Posture By Jim Elliott FeaturesFeatures Credit: OXE MARINE CRANES 24 The OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Cimco Marine’s 200hp

  • MR Jun-19#58 , Devon PL6 6DE United Kingdom , UK , 
TANK MEASURING SYSTEMS)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    .com Manahawkin, NJ 29501, USA , tel:(609) 978-3523, 8823 Ext. 119, chris.peitchinis@tube-mac.com contact: Plymouth, Devon PL6 6DE United Kingdom , UK , TANK MEASURING SYSTEMS fax:(609) 978-4959, BJDME@marinewinch.com Chris Peitchinis, www.tube-mac.com tel:+44 (0) 1752 723330, sales@siliconsensing

  • MR Jun-19#55 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
NEW MT 603 Series 
Radio)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS NEW MT 603 Series Radio Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#42  As long  Smith, who moved to the UK after  ? eets.
up front)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    position.” through acquisition of competitors’ However, it’s worth pointing out, right of scale at the company level. As long Smith, who moved to the UK after ? eets. up front, that bigger is not always bet- as bigger is not in fact much better, then stints with large New York area tanker Alexandros

  • MR Jun-19#26 2019
THE U.S. WORK
A ‘work in progress,’ the North American)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    2019 THE U.S. WORK A ‘work in progress,’ the North American brown water, shallow draft sectors have experienced a tumultuous year of evolution, changing market conditions, a rapidly shifting regulatory environment and new opportunities. Anything but boring; and within the pages of Maritime Reporter’ &

  • MR Jun-19#24 F
FUEL: LOGISTICS
Benchmarking IMO 2020
By Barry Parker
“One)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    F FUEL: LOGISTICS Benchmarking IMO 2020 By Barry Parker “One of the biggest shake-ups in the and are current prices for future dates.” duced essentially anywhere. Tightening pliant VLSFO in Asia – Singapore, Thai- product markets is right around the cor- These wind currents will depend on ac- the standard

  • MR Jun-19#19 I
INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY
companies to gain expertise)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    I INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY companies to gain expertise, both tech- from Massachusetts to Virginia. In 2018, The project utilizes patented Voltur- models will allow easier, faster and more nically and learning how to export this DOE chose the New York State Energy nUS platform technology, a ? oating

  • MR Jun-19#17  faced by 
project off MA.)  a UK-designed offshore support)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 17

    Wind ready stepped up to the plate and built tially stopping progress for OSW farms. the knotty jurisdictional issues faced by project off MA.) a UK-designed offshore support ves- This is also the case for what type of visa too many agencies in the OSW permit- sel, which was used in the Deepwater

  • MR Jun-19#16 I
INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY
Joan Bondareff is of counsel)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    I INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY Joan Bondareff is of counsel in Blank Rome’s Washington, D.C., of? ce who focuses her practice on marine transportation, environmental, regulatory, renewable energy, and legislative issues. She currently serves as Chair of the Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority

  • MR Jun-19#13 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
antinable disease may be)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 13

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE antinable disease may be provisionally ? ne of up to $250,000 or one year in able hazardous condition. The agency ships could be without cargoes (and quarantined. jail or both. Violations by organizations also monitors advance notices of ar- possibly crews, support

  • MR Jun-19#12 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
ed several times.  The)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE ed several times. The changes, among countries or places. sisted for at least 48 hours; (3) has more board is or may be contaminated with a other things, make it easier for the CDC Operators of ships on international than common diarrhea; (4) has severe communicable

  • MR Jun-19#10  Stock
ippines, and Ukraine, as well as some lo-)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    are primarily the responsibility reported in Brazil, Israel, Japan, the Phil- of the Centers for Disease Control and © pomogayev/Adobe Stock ippines, and Ukraine, as well as some lo- Prevention (CDC). The CDC is empow- calities in the United States. ered to detain, medically examine, or Recently, a cruise

  • MR Jun-19#8 I
INSIGHTS: TRAINING & EDUCATION
Murray Goldberg is CEO of)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    I INSIGHTS: TRAINING & EDUCATION Murray Goldberg is CEO of Marine Learning Systems which provides software and services to optimize knowledge, skills and behavior in maritime operators. In his former life he was a computer science faculty member at the University of BC researching online learning and

  • MR Jun-19#7 simple isn)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 7

    simple isn't always easy... But furuno radars are a simple choice Your objective is simple…Deliver your vessel and its contents safely and on time. While it might sound simple, we know it’s not easy! Whether you’re navigating the open ocean, busy harbors, or through congested inland waterways, being aware

  • MR Jun-19#6  Contributors
Tom Mulligan - UK
Lisa Overing - Florida
Birthdays)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    ... Vice President, Sales Rob Howard howard@marinelink.com Web Contributor Michelle Howard mhoward@marinelink.com Editorial Contributors Tom Mulligan - UK Lisa Overing - Florida Birthdays are always a good time to re? ect, and as Maritime Reporter & and a dozen eNews that delivers the Claudio Paschoa

  • MR Jun-19#5 . 
2XU&KLHI7HFKQRORJ\2IÀFHUKDVOHGDELJDGYDQFH While our)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 5

    COMPACT HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER. Joe is feeling a strong sense of accomplishment. fueling for a cleaner, carbon reduced environment. 2XU&KLHI7HFKQRORJ\2IÀFHUKDVOHGDELJDGYDQFH While our leadership comes from our technology, in hydrogen technology. At 3 Megawatts, we have our success is the result of one essential