United States Marine Corps

  • Change is inevitable, especially in Washington, DC, and particularly within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Waterways Council, Inc. (WCI) is a strong partner with the Corps, as navigation is a critical business line within its Civil Works’ mission. 

    Over the last year, we have seen some of the Corps’ best and brightest officers and civilians retire after decades of service to the Army, to the Corps of Engineers, to the inland navigation industry and of course, to the nation. And while they have been succeeded by a new crop of dedicated, seasoned leaders who will continue to serve as reliable partners, WCI will miss what these stalwarts brought to the collective table to maintain and modernize our inland waterways system. 

    Last August (2015), Major General John W. Peabody, Deputy Commanding General for Civil and Emergency Operations, retired after a career that spanned more than 35 years in numerous leadership positions including the Corps’ Pacific Ocean Division, Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, and the Mississippi Valley Division, and as Executive Director of the Inland Waterways Users Board.  

    In an article in WCI’s newsletter Capitol Currents written just after his retirement, General Peabody noted that within the Corps, “the most notable area of improvement is in Planning, where we have nearly tripled our rate of study completion over the last three years. In the navigation program unscheduled lock outages have been declining in number and duration for the last few years, due in part to a more focused risk reduction performance metric instituted in 2013.” 

    General Peabody was succeeded by MG Ed Jackson, PE, who came to Corps’ headquarters after serving in a variety of command assignments that included Commanding General (Forward) of the Corps of Engineers’ Transatlantic Division in Kabul, Afghanistan for Operation Enduring Freedom. He was also Commanding General of the Corps’ South Atlantic Division in Atlanta, the Commander and District Engineer of the Little Rock District, and Commander of the 54th Engineer Battalion (Mechanized) for Operation Iraqi Freedom among many impressive command assignments.

    In speaking to WCI’s Board of Directors and 2016 Washington Meeting attendees last March, General Jackson said that he was committed to delivering on Corps’ commitments, to strategic engagement, to continuing the Corps’ Civil Works Transformation, and to managing transitions, noting, “The nation’s security depends on its economic strength, and its economic strength depends on its infrastructure.”

    Last May, Lieutenant General Thomas P. Bostick retired as the Corps’ Chief of Engineers after serving the U.S. Army for 38 years. In this role, he served as the senior military officer overseeing most of the nation’s civil works infrastructure and military construction, and was responsible for more than 37,000 civilian employees and 600 military personnel who provided project management and construction support to 250 Army and Air Force installations in more than 100 countries around the world. Prior to his work with the Corps, LTG Bostick served as Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1, Personnel, U.S. Army, responsible for developing, managing, and executing manpower and personnel plans, programs, and policies for the Army. General Bostick also served in a variety of command and staff assignments both in the Continental United States and overseas.

    Proud of many things during his career with the Corps, upon retirement, General Bostick noted that “Our efforts to educate stakeholders, including Congress and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), are paying off. President Obama, Vice President Biden and members of Congress are now talking more about our infrastructure due to our efforts to educate leaders about our pressing water resources needs.”

    General Bostick was succeeded by LTG Todd Semonite as the 54th Chief of Engineers of the Corps of Engineers. General Semonite had last served as Deputy Commanding General, Combined Security Transition Command in Afghanistan. Before that, he was Deputy Commanding General for the Corps. 

    General Semonite, in a series of “On the Road Again” YouTube videos at various Corps’ lock projects, said, “Technology reaps innovation and that is what the Corps is going to do.  We have to continue to deliver on time – we are Building Strong and we are going to finish strong!”

    Also last May, Brigadier General Mark Toy was named as the new Commanding General of the Great Lakes & Ohio River Division of the Corps to succeed Brigadier General Richard Kaiser, who headed out to serve in Afghanistan. General Toy was previously the Commanding General of the Corps’ South Pacific Division.

    On August 3, Steven L. Stockton, P.E., SES, retired as Director of Civil Works for the Corps, the highest civilian position in the agency. He served more than 45 years in service to the Federal government, 41 years with the Corps of Engineers.  Steve had been extremely generous with his time to industry over his career and his wise counsel will be sorely missed by many.   

    As Mr. Stockton’s successor, we welcome James Dalton, who is serving as the Acting Director of Civil Works.  Before this, he served as Chief of the Engineering and Construction (E&C) Division and was responsible for policy, program, and technical expertise in the execution of multi-billion dollars of design and construction programs for the U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, Department of Defense, other Federal agencies, and over 60 foreign nations.  He also served as the Corps’ South Atlantic Division Regional Integration Team (RIT) team leader, the South Pacific Division RIT Leader, the USACE Climate Change Adaption Committee Chair, and the lead for USACE on Resilience.

    Our country is stronger for having all of these distinguished gentlemen serve the U.S. Army and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  Our waterways – and all that they bring to the United States – will continue to support commerce and all their beneficiaries under the direction of these fine Corps leaders.

    A grateful and strong nation thanks them all.   

     


    (As published in the September 2016 edition of Marine News)
     

  • Adm. O.W. Siler, United States Coast Guard Commandant, recently presented the United States Coast Guard Distinguished Public Service Award to Capt. Francis B. Crocco, USNR ( r e t . ) , who heads the firm of Francis B. Crocco, Inc., San Juan, Puerto Rico. The citation, which was awarded at the

  • officer of Avondale Industries, Inc., has been chosen to receive the 1989 Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz Award given by the Navy League of the United States, a 70,000-member civilian organization dedicated to America's maintaining a strong and viable maritime defense through the Navy, Marine

  • Company, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, have announced their intention to jointly invest in a trailing suction hopper dredge for operation in the United States. To be named Eagle I, the dredge will have a 4,750-cubic-yard capacity and will be constructed in a United States shipyard. Construction on

  • Kocak, a Maritime Prepositioning Ship converted for the Department of the Navy, and the USNS Algol (TAKR- 287), a Fast Sealift Ship converted for the United States Navy. The Sgt. Matej Kocak is the first of three roll-on/roll-off (RO/RO) vessels that NASSCO is converting into Maritime Prepositioning Ships

  • Company. He was the director of insurance and claims for the last seven years of his 22 years of service with Prudential. Mr. Myers, a United States veteran with the Corps of Engineers, presently serves on the board of directors for the Association of Water Transportation Officers, as a

  • responsible for marine construction, navigation and flood control. Bean International is responsible for marine construction outside the continental United States. Its experience includes work in Nigeria, Barbados, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, and Saudi Arabia

  • and Shipyard Company, Savannah, Ga. The contract is for drydocking, a special survey by the American Bureau of Shipping, and recertification by the United States Coast Guard of the USNS Southern Cross, a government- owned breakbulk cargo vessel recently obtained by MSC. USNS Southern Cross, now part of

  • in length and 1,500 tons launch weight for the offshore oil industry, cruise and diving industry, tug and barge operators and specialized craft for the United States and foreign governments.   The Case: Horizon owns and operates two shipyard facilities in Bayou La Batre, Alabama, located on a 100’ wide

  • u r e company to provide dredge designs, detail construction drawings, associated engineering services, and dredge equipment to clients throughout the United States and Canada. Corporate offices for the new company, which will be named Amalgamated Dredge Engineering, Inc., are located in the Moorestown

  • .S. shipyards, are owned by U.S. companies and staff their ships and projects with hardworking Americans. U.S.-based Dredgers build to suit the needs of the United States.   Getting Started: Dredging Policy 101 We all know that it takes a significant amount of time to complete an environmental analysis before

  • We now know that the Panama Canal expansion is real. More containerized cargo is transiting the Canal from Asia to ports on the East and Gulf Coasts of the United States than ever before – and the volumes will continue to increase moving forward. With that, more liquids and natural gas products are being exported

  • MT Apr-19#64 Index page MTR APRIL19:MTR Layouts  4/15/2019  9:39 AM)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 64

    Index page MTR APRIL19:MTR Layouts 4/15/2019 9:39 AM Page 1 Advertiser Index PageCompany Website Phone# 25 . . . . .Blueprint Subsea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.blueprintsubsea.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .+44 (0) 1539 531536 13 . . . . .Deep Ocean Engineering

  • MT Apr-19#63 PRODUCT, PROFESSIONAL, VESSELS, 
MTR
BARGES & REAL ESTATE)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 63

    PRODUCT, PROFESSIONAL, VESSELS, MTR BARGES & REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Marketplace For over 30 years, All American Marine has been at the forefront of aluminum vessel design and manufacturing. From our award-winning hybrid-electric passenger ferry or a high-speed catamaran with dynamic hydrofoil technology

  • MT Apr-19#61 Balmoral Boltless Bend Restrictor
Balmoral has extended)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 61

    Balmoral Boltless Bend Restrictor Balmoral has extended its bend restric- tor range to include a genuinely boltless restrictor (patent pending). This innovation allows ? tting times to be slashed, offering savings in offshore installation costs. In line with Balmoral’s track record for prod- uct

  • MT Apr-19#60 Products Buoyancy
DeepWater Buoyancy’s DeepWater Benthic)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 60

    Products Buoyancy DeepWater Buoyancy’s DeepWater Benthic Lander DeepWater Buoyancy claims to be components, there are also plastic, com- lander is free-fall deployed to the sea- the world’s largest supplier of subsea posite, polyurethane and fabricated met- ? oor to collects data. The product is buoyancy

  • MT Apr-19#59 ployment and retrieval.  Its portfolio of  ers in the)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 59

    ployment and retrieval. Its portfolio of ers in the marine, construction, indus- Hawboldt Industries Hawboldt is a designer and manufac- rental equipment includes winches with trial and oil and gas industries. Based turer of custom-built Launch and Recov- a variety of cables, mobile A-frames in in New

  • MT Apr-19#58 Products LARS
MacArtney A/S
The MacArtney Group is a)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 58

    Products LARS MacArtney A/S The MacArtney Group is a global sup- instruments to large work class ROV system design features an industry plier of underwater technology systems, systems. MERMAC A LARS solutions unique extra skid joint which allows the products and integrated solutions. can be designed as

  • MT Apr-19#57 come one of the principal innovators 
in the subsea)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 57

    come one of the principal innovators in the subsea imaging and measure- ment industry. It is headquartered is in BIRNS, Inc. Kildare, Ireland with of? ces in the U.S., BIRNS started out in the subsea the U.K., China and Australia. industry creating underwater cam- Currently the company is building

  • MT Apr-19#54 1,700-kilometer mission autonomously collecting ?  sheries)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 54

    1,700-kilometer mission autonomously collecting ? sheries thus increasing mission ef? ciency. acoustics and physical properties of the sea surface. As part Looking back 20 years, we celebrate the progress and ad- of this multi-vehicle mission under the U.K. NERC/Defra vancements made in ocean observatio

  • MT Apr-19#53 Compared with historical data collected over centuries)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 53

    Compared with historical data collected over centuries, this year suggest seismic motion was consistent with displacement new information will help scientists better predict geologic at the full convergence rate. From the results of his missions, activity. Dr. Chadwell concluded the Wave Gliders have

  • MT Apr-19#52 ver the past 20 years, great strides have been made  Sea?)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    ver the past 20 years, great strides have been made Sea? oor geodesy projects are underway across the globe, all in the ability to observe and monitor the worlds’ in pursuit of scienti? c advances that will help us crack the ocean. Just think that less than two decades ago, one code on earthquake and

  • MT Apr-19#51 Changing the Equation 
for Ocean Observation
By Ryan)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 51

    Changing the Equation for Ocean Observation By Ryan Carlon www.marinetechnologynews.com Marine Technology Reporter 51 MTR #3 (50-63).indd 51 4/11/2019 2:25:52 PM

  • MT Apr-19#47 2019  
Media Kit
EDITORIAL CALENDAR
2019
Market Feature)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 47

    2019 Media Kit EDITORIAL CALENDAR 2019 Market Feature ProfileTechnical FeatureProduct Feature Ad Close: Dec 21Ad Close: Jan 22 Ad Close: Feb 21 JAN/FEBFEBRUARYMARCH Underwater Vehicle Annual Oceanographic Instrumentation: Measurement, Process & Analysis Subsea Defense Ocean Business 2019 Technology

  • MT Apr-19#46 tech delivers cost savings and Waagen’s Test Center)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 46

    tech delivers cost savings and Waagen’s Test Center attracts A place to grow Along with the 1,100-square-meter testing and training cen- wind power entrepreneurs, ? oating or marine wind power con- ter backed by The Switch — plus researchers, equipment and tinues to grow. Since Equinor’s launch of a

  • MT Apr-19#45 At least one unnamed wind player (our guess is Equinor))
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 45

    At least one unnamed wind player (our guess is Equinor) has “Norwegian Catapult” or the Test Center — is hoping to pro- already signed on with Unitech. While they’ve opted for wind duce other Unitechs out of an expected stream of startups. power cables, Unitech is also in negotiations with clients for

  • MT Apr-19#44 n Europe, where offshore turbines heavily dot maritime)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 44

    n Europe, where offshore turbines heavily dot maritime tween wind turbines. The spooling system can also be mount- maps, there’s acknowledged room for innovation in ed as a barge. turbine construction, support shipping and subsea. In- Spooled cable is custom “spun” like yarn from a ? xed or Istallations

  • MT Apr-19#43 The making of a 
(supply chain) star
Wind is “the tech of)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 43

    The making of a (supply chain) star Wind is “the tech of choice,” the International Energy Agency said recently, just as a new report by the University of Delaware outlined the opportunity in U.S. of shore wind: 5,000 miles of of shore cabling and 1,700 turbines, it turns out, are bundled into current

  • MT Apr-19#41 AUV visuals: 
Swire Seabed’s 
user interface. 
Photo:)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 41

    AUV visuals: Swire Seabed’s user interface. Photo: Swire Seabed Norway has announced it will follow the Cooke Isles example of issuing licenses to quali? ed subsea mining companies. Ocean Minerals’ quali? ed offshore process involves low- ering pipe bound to nodule-harvesters on the seabed. Nod- ules

  • MT Apr-19#39 waii, underwater mining tools target the whole gamut of)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 39

    waii, underwater mining tools target the whole gamut of min- of major offshore acreage awards. Deepsea miner, Ocean ing support tasks. Minerals, says REEs are “17 chemically similar metals con- sisting of the 15 elements known as the lanthanides plus yt- High-stakes ops trium and scandium” and they’re of

  • MT Apr-19#38 pling survey, mapping, hyperspectral photo work (met- of)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 38

    pling survey, mapping, hyperspectral photo work (met- of the 47th Underwater Mining Conference in Bergen last als detection), environmental monitoring, risk assessment, year — yes, the 47th — organizers noted the achievements cutting-process observation and serving as equipment mules and attendance of a

  • MT Apr-19#37 Mining for AUVs
In Europe, there are sure signs that)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 37

    Mining for AUVs In Europe, there are sure signs that underwater mining is the next big market for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROV) and new “drones” called HROV, DART or TURTLE. Among the indicators is the involvement of mining companies, governments

  • MT Apr-19#35 tenance activities, these are effectively hotel boats with)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 35

    tenance activities, these are effectively hotel boats with a lot term we want to develop the HAUV track and survey buried of redundant time. We have developed HAUV to be able to be cables autonomously. Various pipe tracking technologies are deployed and recovered from these vessels essentially replac-

  • MT Apr-19#34 survey, producing stunning images, as well as point cloud)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 34

    survey, producing stunning images, as well as point cloud data, says Ward. “The CathX Laser system provides a very high- of both the pipeline and passing marine life (see inset with de- resolution point cloud of the pipeline and adjacent seabed. The tail of the shark’s teeth, taken at 2 knots) using a

  • MT Apr-19#33 AUVs in the market are not actually that autonomous;)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 33

    AUVs in the market are not actually that autonomous; often from a quayside at a lake close to Saab’s Facility in Sweden the vessel needs to track the vehicle during a scope, which, in to perform a “mow the lawn” style pre-programmed survey our eyes, defeated the object of the autonomous feature.”

  • MT Apr-19#31 Routes Subsea 
Northeast England-based Modus Seabed)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 31

    Routes Subsea Northeast England-based Modus Seabed Intervention Limited is a relatively small business but its goals are ambitious and focused. By Elaine Maslin www.marinetechnologynews.com Marine Technology Reporter 31 MTR #3 (18-33).indd 31 4/10/2019 4:17:39 PM