University Of Florida

  • Plans are on the drawing board to construct a modern port in Nome, Alaska.

    The city is asking the state legislature to appropriate $38.5 million for construction of a medium draft port near the mouth of the Snake River. The project is the number one priority for marine construction in northern Alaska, according to State Department of Transportation and Public Facilities official Jonathan Widdis.

    The facilities will eliminate the need to transfer freight at sea to smaller coastal barges to bring it ashore. Today the cost of "lighterage" is about 25 percent of the freight cost from Seattle.

    The port layout, prepared by the engineering firm Tippetts-Abbett-McCarthy - Stratton (TAMS), features a 3,600-foot rubble mound causeway leading to an offshore terminal. Short-term storage and marshaling areas will be available at the seaward end, with about 60 acres onshore for container and general cargo storage. Additional piers and service areas can be added as needed for offshore oil company activities year-round. The causeway can be extended another 1,000 to 1,500 feet to provide berths for bulk ore carriers.

    With potential year-round use in mind, along with the need to keep maintenance and construction costs at a minimum, engineers have designed an ice-resistant causeway that also will withstand the strong erosive forces of Norton Sound's high winds and waves during late summer and autumn storms.

    The causeway's design is based in part on studies conducted by the Institute of Hydraulics Research of the University of Iowa. A model of the causeway was placed in a 60-foot by 20-foot tank where sheets of ice were pushed up against it.

    A major objective was to develop a way to prevent the ice from overriding the causeway.

    The tests showed that, despite the special sloping design created for the sides of the causeway, ice still moved over the model.

    As a result, TAMS project manager Michael Horton said the design philosophy is now one of management rather than prevention.

    "The causeway is designed to accommodate ice override as an occasional event," he said.

    This will be done by building the sides at a slope. One side will be built higher than the other, so that ice override can be bulldozed off. "The cost savings of this system over an elaborate ice prevention scheme are substantial," Mr. Horton said.

    To help prevent the causeway from eroding, large boulders will be placed on the slopes to act as breakwater barriers. Testing at the University of Florida will tell engineers more about the size of boulders needed to help stabilize the slopes, but Mr.

    Horton estimated rocks as large as 20 tons will be used.

    The dock will be built with circular concrete caissons. Thirty of the large tub-shaped forms will be barged from the Lower 48 and sunk into place at the seaward end of the causeway to form the dock face. The circular caissons will stand up better than the traditional box-shaped forms under the direct stress of the waves.

    Another feature of the causeway design is the inclusion of a "fish breach": a small bridge near the shoreline to permit salmon and other species of fish to migrate freely.

    Preliminary studies are complete and final design work was recently submitted to city officials by TAMS. If the legislature approves the requested $38.5-million for construction, the port project could go to bid during late summer, 1983, according to Nome city manager Ivan Widom.

  • a recent section meeting. This is the second official student section to be established in the Southeast Section, the first being at Florida Atlantic University. Robert Mende, SNAME executive secretary, presented a plaque from national headquarters to the 25 member student group from the institute's Department

  • chief executive officer of the company. Mr. Muller, who will be based in company headquarters in Greenwich, Conn., is a graduate of the State University of New York, Maritime College, Fort Schuyler, Bronx, N.Y. . An executive with the Moran organization since 1977, Mr. Muller started with the

  • . Edmond Moran came to the company from States Marine Lines in 1971 to work in the sales department at the New York office. A graduate of Georgetown University, he was appointed vice president of Florida Towing Company in Jacksonville when that firm was acquired by Moran in 1976. He returned to New York

  • Northeastern sales manager, and will be responsible for the area from Maine to Hampton Roads, and Government contracts. Mr. Robinson attended Niagara University and graduated from Notre Dame University Midshipman School. He has 30 years' experience in the marine paint and coatings field. Mr. Robinson is

  • shop, welding and fabrication facility, has completed the fabrication and assembly of the first Swirling Flow Research Combustor for Florida Atlantic University. This stainless steel combustor will determine the effects of swirling air flow on a combustion process such as fuel-air mixing, flame stability and

  • addition to the graduate program, undergraduate scholarships of various amounts are made available by SNAME at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Michigan, State University of New York Maritime College, and Florida Atlantic University. Grantsin- aid are also available at the University of

  • Mr. Moran directed Moran Maritime Services, Inc. to a new business development office located in Houston, Texas. Mr. Moran graduated from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. in 1967, completed studies in its Graduate School of Foreign Service the following year and joined the corporate planning divisio

  • .rdsea.com CEO/President: Rick Cole RDSEA International, Inc., St Pete Beach, Florida, founded in 2002 by Rick Cole while a Research Associate at the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science, around the increased need for experience and expertise in “ocean technologies” in the blue-water and

  • Secretary, Mr. Garrett served as Under Secretary of the Navy from August 6, 1987. Mr. Garrett earned a B.S. degree in Business Management from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, and received his J.D. degree from the University of San Diego School of Law, San Diego, Calif., graduating cum

  • to the National Science Foundation. The vessel was built by Atlantic Marine, Inc. of Fort George Island, Fla., and will be operated by the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. A sister vessel, the Cape Hatteras, is scheduled for delivery in the fall this

  • and editor. He is a former editor of Florida Shipper Magazine and has served as an adjunct professor of communications at Florida International University. Eyerdam graduated from Florida State University with a double major in English Literature and Government. His articles have appeared in myriad maritime

  • MN Jun-19#28  scenario 
Florida State University with majors 
With roughly)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    petrol equivalents. Based on in- the Miami River. He is a graduate of knots,” Mr. Polesie explained. service data, an operating scenario Florida State University with majors With roughly equivalent dimen- over 5 years shows OXE’s TCO to in English and Government. His arti- sions – albeit with a higher weight

  • MN Jun-19#22  a MBA with merit from the University of 
London. Additionally)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    , Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies with highest distinction from the U.S. Naval War College and a MBA with merit from the University of London. Additionally, he has earned over 75 Coast Guard, State and industry awards and medals, including the Coast Guard’s prestigious Inspirational

  • MN Jun-19#16 INSIGHTS
outboard. This difference is ampli?  ed when)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    INSIGHTS outboard. This difference is ampli? ed when looking below the engine or because the drives are permanently in the water. the mid-range rpm. The increased low-end torque will push The Navy on the other hand, will be able to deploy missions heavy loaded hulls through rough waters with less

  • MN Jun-19#14  an EMBA in Business from the University of  weight and package)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    oel Reid joined Cox Powertrain in April 2015. He military and civil applications, offering a signi? cantly reduced holds an EMBA in Business from the University of weight and package size compared to conventional diesel in- JChicago, a Master’s Degree in Marine Surveying board engines. Not only does it

  • MN Jun-19#8  at Florida International University. 
operations from the)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    per Magazine and has served as an adjunct professor ter, commercial diver and project manager on salvage of communications at Florida International University. operations from the Equator to the Arctic. He holds a Eyerdam graduated from Florida State University with a Bachelor of Science in Environment

  • MN Jun-19#4 MarineNews
MarineNews  June 2019 Volume 30   Number)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    MarineNews MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 (ISSN#1087-3864) (USPS#013-952) Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 tel: (561) 732-4368; fax: (561) 732-6984 Departments Analysis New York: 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 & tel: (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.

  • MR Jun-19#64 .(954) 990-5429
51 . . . . . .University of Hawaii Marine Center)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    . . . . . . . . . . .www.ShipMoneyCorporate.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(954) 990-5429 51 . . . . . .University of Hawaii Marine Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .porteng@soest.hawaii.edu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • MR Jun-19#61 MR
                                          
Professional)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC.GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition Naval Architects ? Naval Architecture Services and Marine Engineers ? Marine Engineering

  • MR Jun-19#46  improvement, but 
Maritime University, Marine Learning  This)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    by the World sustainability of any industry endeavor. But the role of the modern seafarer is role in this statistical improvement, but Maritime University, Marine Learning This is especially the case in the mari- changing. since the ‘human factor’ is cited in more Systems and New Wave Media, publish-

  • MR Jun-19#19 . ecutive Director at the University of  • 2016 – Block Island)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    R&D projects, Habib Dagher, PhD, PE is the Ex- wind. • 1992 – President Bush signed the and NYSERDA matched that amount. ecutive Director at the University of • 2016 – Block Island Wind Farm in Energy Policy Act, authorizing a produc- Finally, Norton emphasized the im- Maine’s Advanced Structures and

  • MR Jun-19#16  review  grams at the University of Rhode Island, 
Management)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    education for OSW pro- To date, the Bureau of Ocean Energy goals for renewable energy generally almost completed an extensive review grams at the University of Rhode Island, Management (BOEM), part of the Inte- and offshore wind in particular. For ex- of the 100-turbine Vineyard Wind proj- and $1.5M

  • MR Jun-19#8  faculty member at the University of BC researching 
online)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    and services to optimize knowledge, skills and behavior in maritime operators. In his former life he was a computer science faculty member at the University of BC researching online learning and assessment delivery models and their effectiveness. This led to him develop WebCT, a learning management system

  • MR Jun-19#6 MARITIME
Editorial
REPORTER
AND
ENGINEERING NEWS
M A R I N)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    MARITIME Editorial REPORTER AND ENGINEERING NEWS M A R I N E L I N K . C O M HQ 118 E. 25th St., 2nd Floor New York, NY 10010 USA Tel +1 212 477 6700 Fax +1 212 254 6271 www.marinelink.com FL Of? ce 215 NW 3rd St Boynton Beach, FL 33435-4009 Tel +1 561 732 4368 Fax +1 561 732 6984 Publisher John C.

  • MR Jun-19#4  Chemistry from the University of Limerick in 1986)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    writer based in Ireland. Mulligan earned a Master Degree in US Coast Guard. His last tour was at the Coast Guard Research Industrail Chemistry from the University of Limerick in 1986. In U.S.: and Development Center in New London, Conn. where, among One full year (12 issues) $110.00; two years (24 issues)

  • MT Jun-19#56  Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland
June)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    Ocean Technology, and provides a safe, reliable, near-Arctic environment to test new technology. Photos: Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland June 2019 56 MTR MTR #5 (50-63).indd 56 5/28/2019 9:50:00 A

  • MT Jun-19#55  Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland
www)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 55

    and intensities of lighting in a conical trap used in snow crab ? sheries in Canada and Norway. Photo: Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland www.marinetechnologynews.com Marine Technology Reporter 55 MTR #5 (50-63).indd 55 5/28/2019 9:49:30 A

  • MT Jun-19#54  Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland
At the)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 54

    Research Institutions Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland At the Forefront of Ocean Technology Photo: Tom Mulligan World-class facilities, research and education at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland By Tom Mulligan he Marine Institute or

  • MT Jun-19#52  Steven Saul of Arizona State University and Jer-
All images)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    Living Oceans Foundation; Sam Purkis Arthur Gleason of the UM Rosenstiel School; Charlotte Purkis of Sea from Space Inc; Steven Saul of Arizona State University and Jer- All images photo credit: Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation emy M. Kerr of Nova Southeastern University. June 2019 52 MTR MTR

  • MT Jun-19#51  Oceans Foundation and the University of 
Miami Rosenstiel)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 51

    Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Coral Reef Mapping Photo credit: Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation This ? rst-ever global coral reef atlas contains maps of over 25,097 sq. miles of coral reefs and surroundi

  • MT Jun-19#27  China USV used by China 
University of Geosciences for measuring)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 27

    already, we should grasp this op- the USV,” said Jack Hu, Technical Manager at Nortek China. Clockwise, starting left: Nortek China USV used by China University of Geosciences for measuring the current pro? le and the vehicle’s velocity during drifting. The image shows a deployment in the South China Sea

  • MT Jun-19#25 ,  ktronik, the Technical University of 
or autonomous communicati)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 25

    , on Boskalis. long missions, thyssenkrupp MS is The company also has Atlas Ele- looking to use self-propelled modems, ktronik, the Technical University of or autonomous communication nodes, Berlin and the University of Rostock with bi-directional data transmission working on the project, on the

  • MT Jun-19#21  of  sea Engineering from University of 
these concepts were)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 21

    a controlled depth,” based Subsea Valley cluster and an- says Lima, who has an MSc in Sub- nual conference is now called, some of sea Engineering from University of these concepts were outlined, includ- Aberdeen and a MSc in Innovation ing those from two Norwegian tech- and Entrepreneurship from University

  • MT Jun-19#14 ?  rst project, in which the University of Queensland (UQ),)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 14

    the more than 3,000 reefs within Tthe 350,000 sq. km of the GBR. EOMAP’s technology provides essential data for this world- ? rst project, in which the University of Queensland (UQ), Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, and the Australian Institute of Marine Science are partners. The resulting maps will

  • MT Jun-19#12  professor emeritus at the University of Stavanger (UiS),)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 12

    Petroleum Museum Getting Down to It; 50 Years of Subsea Success in Norway has been co-authored by industry veteran, and now professor emeritus at the University of Stavanger (UiS), Arn? nn Nergaard, and senior historian at the Norwegian Petroleum Museum Kristin Øye Gjerde. now. I have been in the industry