University Of Rhode Islands Graduate School

  • (The Rhode Island Subsea Sector is profiled in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technology Reporter. Rhode Island Governor Lincoln D. Chafee offers insights on the wealth of opportunity found in his state).

     

    As the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, Rhode Island was at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurial creativity, and economic transformation, beginning with the Slater Mill in 1793.  Just as Rhode Island led our nation through the introduction of new manufacturing processes two hundred years ago, we continue to break new ground and promote economic growth through our maritime and defense industries, cutting-edge research institutions, and the Ocean State’s position as the country’s current leader for offshore wind energy.
    Only in Rhode Island can you find such a diverse range of defense and maritime-related expertise concentrated in such a small geographic footprint.  Our defense sector supports multiple Department of Defense and Homeland Security needs with a highly connected network of companies - from multinational corporations to start-ups that are moving out of the lab and into the marketplace.  Rhode Island excels in manufacturing and developing technology for everything from sophisticated nuclear submarines to wooden skiffs.
    From the establishment of the Newport Torpedo Station on Goat Island in 1869 to the emergence of today’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island has a long and proud history of leading the U.S. Navy’s undersea warfare research and system development efforts.  Rhode Island’s excellence in undersea warfare has fostered partnerships between the defense and private industries that have created thousands of quality jobs and support a strong supply chain of growing businesses in the state.  
    Rhode Island has also made critical infrastructure investments in our ports, including the Port of Davisville at the Quonset Business Park - home to well-known firms like General Dynamics Electric Boat – and the Port of Providence.  By taking steps to modernize our ports, one of our leading economic assets, we have expanded the capacity of Rhode Island to continue to be a premier hub for maritime activity for decades to come.   
    Rhode Island’s 400 miles of coastline has helped the state to become the center of world-class oceanographic research.  As a leading institute of ocean education and research, the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography is playing a key role in the development of ocean science, spanning the core disciplines of marine geology and geophysics, biology, atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and physics.
    In 1966, URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering was the first in the nation to establish Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Ocean Engineering.  The program conducts research and trains a world-renowned workforce in ocean robotics, underwater acoustics, tsunamis, coastal circulation, marine geomechanics, ocean structures, and offshore energy generation.  Graduates are employed by major corporations, small companies, and consulting firms, as well as major government research laboratories.
    Rhode Island led our country in a major economic transformation at the end of the 18th century, and the state is positioned to do so once again by paving the way in exploring the sound and effective development of offshore wind energy.  Through a partnership with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Rhode Island has provided critical scientific and technical information to identify the optimal areas for offshore renewable energy development. 
    A critical part of this process has been Rhode Island’s investment of more than $10 million in the creation of an Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for promoting balanced uses of our oceans.  Rhode Island is the only state that has adopted a SAMP in federal waters with a specific focus on the development of offshore renewable energy resources.  At the same time the Ocean SAMP was adopted, Rhode Island held a competitive process to choose a preferred developer for an offshore wind farm.  The developer has already made significant investments to establish a wind farm in state waters off Block Island, which could well be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.
    Utilizing the natural capital found throughout our state, Rhode Island will continue to lead as a regional and national center of excellence for renewable energy.
    Just as they have throughout Rhode Island’s history, our defense and maritime industries, educational and research institutions, technological advances, and coastal infrastructure are key economic advantages.  Rhode Island is open for business and continues to lead the way in the 21st century.   

    Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor, Rhode Island
     

    (As published in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com)

  • federal waters and then  moved to set auction dates.  Led by Fugate, the project  involved a minimum of 40-50 scientists and researchers between The University of Rhode Island (URI) and Rodger Williams University, along with contributors from other government agencies. Research conducted by URI provided

  • may be the smallest state in the union, but its vision of the future is as far reaching as the ocean lapping at its shores. Taking a page from the University of Rhode Island (URI) motto, “Think Big, We do!,” the Rhode Island Economic Development Corp. (RIEDC) is working hard to position the state as “a

  • Company prior to entry into the United States Navy in November 1953 as ensign, USNR. While under Navy sponsorship, Captain McNulty attended Tufts University where he received an undergraduate degree in history and government. He later attended George Washington University, earning a master's degree in

  • Guard for oceanographic research. In addition to the new ships, the Navy’s research fleet include R/V Thomas G. Thompson (AGOR 23), operated by the University of Washington: R/V Roger Revelle (AGOR 24), operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography; R/V Atlantis (AGOR 25); operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic

  • applied sciences firm in Austin, Texas. Mr. Fitzgerald retired from the U.S. Navy in 1974 as destroyer squadron commander. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland, the National War College, and the Kennedy School of Government and Politics at Harvard University. He has been with Tracor Marine

  • specialty area of ocean explorer Dr. Bob Ballard. A “Blue MBA” is offered in conjunction with URI’s College of Business Administration. According to university figures, GSO researchers conduct more than 200 research projects, with a combined budget of approximately $30 million. Much of that funding comes

  • novel concept for ship propulsion. The report, "Resistance Reduction in Merchant Ships by the New Propulsion System," was prepared for MarAd by the University of Rhode Island. The New Propulsion System — the name of the concept — uses a hydraulic transmission outside the ship's hull. An axial-flow pump

  • chief engineer and director of the Mechanical Design Division, reporting directly to Mr. Brown. Mr. McFadden graduated f r om Penn State University with a BS degree in chemical engineering. He also pursued additional college studies at Bucknell University and Drexel University. Prior to

  • an initial assignment as general manager of the Moorestown Division. A graduate of Webb Institute of Naval Architecture with an MBA from Long Island University, his career path has provided comprehensive experience in ship design, construction and operation. Mr. McMullen has been promoted to senior

  • the industry spinoffs,” says Malcolm Spaulding, co-founder of South Kingston, R.I. based ASA Sciences and Professor Emeritus of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. “Contractors locate in Southeastern Rhode Island because of the proximity to NUWC. And for the jobs - lots and lots of them,” continues

  • been named president and chief executive of Worthington Pump, Inc., a Mc- Graw-Edison Company, it was announced recently. A graduate of Iowa State University, Mr. Jeck received his MBA degree from the Wharton Graduate School, and has participated in advanced management programs at the London School of

  • MN Jul-19#56  the  BBA from Texas State University.   Railroad of the Year)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 56

    . Initially, Caleb tional for fourteen years. Rich holds a ings), which was named Short Line will be focused on coordinating the BBA from Texas State University. Railroad of the Year by the American processing of audits and surveys while Short Line Railroad Association in POLB Appoints working to support

  • MN Jul-19#54 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Johnson Allan Toma Garner Tadros)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 54

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Johnson Allan Toma Garner Tadros commercial marine space by pioneer- Merchant Marine Academy, George’s Huibers to Chair NMMA Engine ing autonomous control and advanced maritime roots run deep. He previous- Manufacturers Division perception systems that make surface ly held the

  • MN Jul-19#53  industry for more  Tech University and earned his MBA 
Leading)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    ard go, he has loyally served OMSA Electrical Engineering from Louisiana to Crowley’s Shipping business unit. and the offshore industry for more Tech University and earned his MBA Leading that team will be Shiju Zach- than 10 years. We wish he and his from Nicholls State University. aria, who has been

  • MN Jul-19#49   and innovative practices.
University of Iowa published a)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 49

    turns strates commitments to employee safety, career pathways, out that the answer to both questions is “yes.” In 2013, the and innovative practices. University of Iowa published a study comparing a blended training approach (50% VR and 50% traditional) with tra- Proven Value ditional training methods. As

  • MN Jul-19#46  the Gulf of Mexico.   The University of Delaware’s Special)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 46

    of Morgan City, Louisiana. MW of wind power will be paltry by tomorrow’s standards. By 1949, 44 wells had been drilled into the Gulf of Mexico. The University of Delaware’s Special Initiative on Off- The founding of this industry was anything but simple. shore Wind (SIOW) recently released a white paper

  • MN Jul-19#41 SAFETY & TRAINING
pushes two chemical barges. “It gives)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 41

    SAFETY & TRAINING pushes two chemical barges. “It gives you a chance without learning the hard way if you’re not ready for it. I can’t rave enough about Capt. Shelden and Capt. Jerry. Just racking their brains was bene? cial. They make it enjoyable to go to class on your time off.” LESSONS LEARNED:

  • MN Jul-19#40 SAFETY & TRAINING
MARITIME MARITIME 
SIMULATION SIMULATION)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 40

    SAFETY & TRAINING MARITIME MARITIME SIMULATION SIMULATION AND TRAINING: AND TRAINING: A PARTNERSHIP THAT PAYS OFF It is truly no accident that Delgado Maritime & Industrial Training Center and Florida Marine Transport collaborate so closely. By Lisa Overing ero incidents, zero injuries and eliminatin

  • MN Jul-19#26 COLUMN OP/ED
A Measured Response:
The Offshore Sector’s)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    COLUMN OP/ED A Measured Response: The Offshore Sector’s Support of National Interests in Times of Crisis By Chad Fuhrmann D T C & Recovery Activities Subcommittee in late 2018. The ESPERATE IMES ALL FOR D R intent of the Subcommittee is to lay the foundation for IVERSE ESOURCES In 2017, North

  • MN Jul-19#24 COLUMN LUBRICANTS
A partial list of sustainability improveme)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    COLUMN LUBRICANTS A partial list of sustainability improvements affected from the choice and proper application of EAL lubricants: Water quality and air emissionsReduced energy usage based on friction reductionWaste reduction from longer lasting lubricants Years of service of the equipmentUse of equipment

  • MN Jul-19#14 INSIGHTS
You have been quoted as saying, “Prior to every)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS You have been quoted as saying, “Prior to every major adoption of technology in the US inland river market there is a perfect alignment of opportunity and solution.” Tell us why inland operators are ? nally ready for hybrid and/or electri? cation of propulsion. Just as the diesel engine

  • MN Jul-19#8 Authors   Contributors
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Ben Bryant is Marine Market)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & Ben Bryant is Marine Market electronics and wireless tech- Manager at Klüber Lubrica- nology. He has been active in tion. A graduate of the Massa- the design, patenting and de- MarineNews chusetts Maritime Academy, velopment of a range of safety July 2019 he is a long-time

  • MN Jun-19#28  scenario 
Florida State University with majors 
With roughly)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    petrol equivalents. Based on in- the Miami River. He is a graduate of knots,” Mr. Polesie explained. service data, an operating scenario Florida State University with majors With roughly equivalent dimen- over 5 years shows OXE’s TCO to in English and Government. His arti- sions – albeit with a higher weight

  • MN Jun-19#22  a MBA with merit from the University of 
London. Additionally)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    , Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies with highest distinction from the U.S. Naval War College and a MBA with merit from the University of London. Additionally, he has earned over 75 Coast Guard, State and industry awards and medals, including the Coast Guard’s prestigious Inspirational

  • MN Jun-19#14  an EMBA in Business from the University of  weight and package)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    oel Reid joined Cox Powertrain in April 2015. He military and civil applications, offering a signi? cantly reduced holds an EMBA in Business from the University of weight and package size compared to conventional diesel in- JChicago, a Master’s Degree in Marine Surveying board engines. Not only does it

  • MN Jun-19#10 BY THE NUMBERS
The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    BY THE NUMBERS The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report on Flag State Control The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report given the millions of lives at stake – in the U.S. ? ag ? eet. contains statistics regarding inspections and enforcement In 2018 there were 40 valid Flag State

  • MN Jun-19#8  at Florida International University. 
operations from the)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    per Magazine and has served as an adjunct professor ter, commercial diver and project manager on salvage of communications at Florida International University. operations from the Equator to the Arctic. He holds a Eyerdam graduated from Florida State University with a Bachelor of Science in Environment

  • MR Jun-19#4th Cover MPT. SERIOUSLY S.M.A.R.T.
ONE SCHOOL. UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIE)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4th Cover

    MPT. SERIOUSLY S.M.A.R.T. ONE SCHOOL. UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES. There is nothing like incredibly-real training to better prepare you for serious real-life maritime situations. Our ongoing investment in S.M.A.R.T. simulation provides a visually immersive level of realism that is simply not available in other

  • MR Jun-19#64 .(954) 990-5429
51 . . . . . .University of Hawaii Marine Center)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    . . . . . . . . . . .www.ShipMoneyCorporate.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(954) 990-5429 51 . . . . . .University of Hawaii Marine Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .porteng@soest.hawaii.edu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • MR Jun-19#46  improvement, but 
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    by the World sustainability of any industry endeavor. But the role of the modern seafarer is role in this statistical improvement, but Maritime University, Marine Learning This is especially the case in the mari- changing. since the ‘human factor’ is cited in more Systems and New Wave Media, publish-

  • MR Jun-19#43 world yearbook
“If consolidation was the solution to all)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    world yearbook “If consolidation was the solution to all that ails shipping, then container liner companies would be super pro? table. They are not. In ‘commoditized’ sectors of the shipping industry, which by now includes pretty much everything apart from very small niche markets, there is hardly any

  • MR Jun-19#42 2019
TOP SHIPOWNERS: 
IS BIGGER BETTER?
Like any other)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    2019 TOP SHIPOWNERS: IS BIGGER BETTER? Like any other business, some shipping companies are bigger than others. This article looks at some of the larger participants in the various sectors. “Big” can be de? ned in multiple ways. Here, contributing editor Barry Parker takes a deep dive into the data

  • MR Jun-19#28 2019
sunshine in their bottom lines. They may get their)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 28

    2019 sunshine in their bottom lines. They may get their wish. mented the market for towboats is. By comparison, the to drive up production costs by 2%-3% annually. This In fact, as much as 41 percent – a whopping 17,596 Harbor/Escort market is dominated by two companies, in turn will have a negative

  • MR Jun-19#22 T
TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 22

    T TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY one design.” als. “I’ve just submitted a White Paper Also, creating a system that is ‘smart’, to the Of? ce of Naval Research for that a system able to adjust itself continually full budget,” said van Hemmen. “On to maximize and ef? ciently convert the the commercial side we

  • MR Jun-19#21 T
TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 21

    T TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY SurfWEC @ a Glance Company SurfWEC LLC Tech Wave Energy Harnessing Device Start of Design 2007 Patented 2012 Patent Owner Stevens Institute a patented variable-depth shoaling fea- sil fuels. The patent ricated with buoy- in 2019.” of Technology License Holder SurfWEC LLC ture