University Of Rhode Islands Graduate School

  • (The Rhode Island Subsea Sector is profiled in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technology Reporter. Rhode Island Governor Lincoln D. Chafee offers insights on the wealth of opportunity found in his state).

     

    As the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, Rhode Island was at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurial creativity, and economic transformation, beginning with the Slater Mill in 1793.  Just as Rhode Island led our nation through the introduction of new manufacturing processes two hundred years ago, we continue to break new ground and promote economic growth through our maritime and defense industries, cutting-edge research institutions, and the Ocean State’s position as the country’s current leader for offshore wind energy.
    Only in Rhode Island can you find such a diverse range of defense and maritime-related expertise concentrated in such a small geographic footprint.  Our defense sector supports multiple Department of Defense and Homeland Security needs with a highly connected network of companies - from multinational corporations to start-ups that are moving out of the lab and into the marketplace.  Rhode Island excels in manufacturing and developing technology for everything from sophisticated nuclear submarines to wooden skiffs.
    From the establishment of the Newport Torpedo Station on Goat Island in 1869 to the emergence of today’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island has a long and proud history of leading the U.S. Navy’s undersea warfare research and system development efforts.  Rhode Island’s excellence in undersea warfare has fostered partnerships between the defense and private industries that have created thousands of quality jobs and support a strong supply chain of growing businesses in the state.  
    Rhode Island has also made critical infrastructure investments in our ports, including the Port of Davisville at the Quonset Business Park - home to well-known firms like General Dynamics Electric Boat – and the Port of Providence.  By taking steps to modernize our ports, one of our leading economic assets, we have expanded the capacity of Rhode Island to continue to be a premier hub for maritime activity for decades to come.   
    Rhode Island’s 400 miles of coastline has helped the state to become the center of world-class oceanographic research.  As a leading institute of ocean education and research, the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography is playing a key role in the development of ocean science, spanning the core disciplines of marine geology and geophysics, biology, atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and physics.
    In 1966, URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering was the first in the nation to establish Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Ocean Engineering.  The program conducts research and trains a world-renowned workforce in ocean robotics, underwater acoustics, tsunamis, coastal circulation, marine geomechanics, ocean structures, and offshore energy generation.  Graduates are employed by major corporations, small companies, and consulting firms, as well as major government research laboratories.
    Rhode Island led our country in a major economic transformation at the end of the 18th century, and the state is positioned to do so once again by paving the way in exploring the sound and effective development of offshore wind energy.  Through a partnership with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Rhode Island has provided critical scientific and technical information to identify the optimal areas for offshore renewable energy development. 
    A critical part of this process has been Rhode Island’s investment of more than $10 million in the creation of an Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for promoting balanced uses of our oceans.  Rhode Island is the only state that has adopted a SAMP in federal waters with a specific focus on the development of offshore renewable energy resources.  At the same time the Ocean SAMP was adopted, Rhode Island held a competitive process to choose a preferred developer for an offshore wind farm.  The developer has already made significant investments to establish a wind farm in state waters off Block Island, which could well be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.
    Utilizing the natural capital found throughout our state, Rhode Island will continue to lead as a regional and national center of excellence for renewable energy.
    Just as they have throughout Rhode Island’s history, our defense and maritime industries, educational and research institutions, technological advances, and coastal infrastructure are key economic advantages.  Rhode Island is open for business and continues to lead the way in the 21st century.   

    Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor, Rhode Island
     

    (As published in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com)

  • federal waters and then  moved to set auction dates.  Led by Fugate, the project  involved a minimum of 40-50 scientists and researchers between The University of Rhode Island (URI) and Rodger Williams University, along with contributors from other government agencies. Research conducted by URI provided

  • may be the smallest state in the union, but its vision of the future is as far reaching as the ocean lapping at its shores. Taking a page from the University of Rhode Island (URI) motto, “Think Big, We do!,” the Rhode Island Economic Development Corp. (RIEDC) is working hard to position the state as “a

  • Company prior to entry into the United States Navy in November 1953 as ensign, USNR. While under Navy sponsorship, Captain McNulty attended Tufts University where he received an undergraduate degree in history and government. He later attended George Washington University, earning a master's degree in

  • Guard for oceanographic research. In addition to the new ships, the Navy’s research fleet include R/V Thomas G. Thompson (AGOR 23), operated by the University of Washington: R/V Roger Revelle (AGOR 24), operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography; R/V Atlantis (AGOR 25); operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic

  • applied sciences firm in Austin, Texas. Mr. Fitzgerald retired from the U.S. Navy in 1974 as destroyer squadron commander. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland, the National War College, and the Kennedy School of Government and Politics at Harvard University. He has been with Tracor Marine

  • specialty area of ocean explorer Dr. Bob Ballard. A “Blue MBA” is offered in conjunction with URI’s College of Business Administration. According to university figures, GSO researchers conduct more than 200 research projects, with a combined budget of approximately $30 million. Much of that funding comes

  • novel concept for ship propulsion. The report, "Resistance Reduction in Merchant Ships by the New Propulsion System," was prepared for MarAd by the University of Rhode Island. The New Propulsion System — the name of the concept — uses a hydraulic transmission outside the ship's hull. An axial-flow pump

  • chief engineer and director of the Mechanical Design Division, reporting directly to Mr. Brown. Mr. McFadden graduated f r om Penn State University with a BS degree in chemical engineering. He also pursued additional college studies at Bucknell University and Drexel University. Prior to

  • an initial assignment as general manager of the Moorestown Division. A graduate of Webb Institute of Naval Architecture with an MBA from Long Island University, his career path has provided comprehensive experience in ship design, construction and operation. Mr. McMullen has been promoted to senior

  • the industry spinoffs,” says Malcolm Spaulding, co-founder of South Kingston, R.I. based ASA Sciences and Professor Emeritus of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. “Contractors locate in Southeastern Rhode Island because of the proximity to NUWC. And for the jobs - lots and lots of them,” continues

  • been named president and chief executive of Worthington Pump, Inc., a Mc- Graw-Edison Company, it was announced recently. A graduate of Iowa State University, Mr. Jeck received his MBA degree from the Wharton Graduate School, and has participated in advanced management programs at the London School of

  • MR Nov-19#78 V
VESSELS 
Sovcom?  ot Names New 
Seaspan Shipyard Delivers)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 78

    V VESSELS Sovcom? ot Names New Seaspan Shipyard Delivers OFSV Arctic Shuttle Tanker On October 6, 2019, a naming and ? ag raising ceremo- ny was held in Vladivostok for Sovcom? ot’s latest Arctic shuttle tanker. The vessel was named after Mikhail Laza- rev, a prominent Russian admiral and explorer

  • MR Nov-19#68 VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE &)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE & COUNSEL, AMERICAN P&I CLUB Boriana enjoys giving back to the community which has sup- ported her throughout her ca- reer, pictured here with Martin Davies, the head of the Admiralty Law Center at her alma mater Tulane Law School, where she recently

  • MR Nov-19#66  so to be close to family,  University of So?  a, from which)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 66

    United States in 2001, she siana judge and a Fulbright Scholar at the W did so to be close to family, University of So? a, from which Farrar is a her mother and her sister who had already graduate, instilling in her that “Everything established a life in

  • MR Nov-19#63 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
for installation)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry.

  • MR Nov-19#46 SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER
the region. The)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER the region. The Coast Guard is the sole to man, and there are signi? cant natu- economic investments with every Arctic Urgent requirement provider and operator of the U.S. polar ral resources there,” said Coast Guard nation in key strategic areas, such as oil

  • MR Nov-19#36 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
The Southern Towing)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY The Southern Towing Company Pillars Every Southern Towing employee has a com- pany challenge coin (and the T-shirt!) embla- zoned with the company’s ‘pillars’. Ed Grimm describes what the pillars mean. • Success Through Commitment: “You have to be 100 percent; 100 percent

  • MR Nov-19#24 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
“The US needs to)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND “The US needs to develop a work- force from scratch,” noting that a mas- sive campaign was undertaken in the UK, something that needs to start now in the United States. Laura Smith, USA Director for Atlas Professionals from renewable energy? NJ wants to de- to the

  • MR Nov-19#22  readiness and lo-
University of New York  moving)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 22

    September 26, the State their peers to keep OFW implementation Critically, though, there aren’t going to AOT’s ? rst-to-market readiness and lo- University of New York moving along. (Not everyone responded be 25 such economic engine ports on the cation makes it likely the new facility Maritime College

  • MR Nov-19#20 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
Joan Bondareff is of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND Joan Bondareff is of counsel in Blank Rome’s Washington, D.C., of? ce who focuses her practice on marine trans- portation, environmental, regulatory, renewable energy, and legislative issues. She currently serves as Chair of the Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority

  • MR Nov-19#10  faculty member at the University of BC researching 
online)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    and services to optimize knowledge, skills and behavior in maritime operators. In his former life he was a computer science faculty member at the University of BC researching online learning and assessment delivery models and their effectiveness. This led to him develop WebCT, a learning management system

  • MR Nov-19#4 MARITIME
Authors & Contributors
REPORTER
AND
ENGINEERING)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    MARITIME Authors & Contributors REPORTER AND ENGINEERING NEWS M A R I N E L I N K . C O M ISSN-0025-3448 USPS-016-750 No. 11 Vol. 81 Ewing DiRenzo Bryant Bondareff Goldberg Maritime Reporter/Engineering News (ISSN # 0025-3448) is published monthly (twelve issues) by Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.

  • MN Nov-19#98  President at ICF Interna- University of British Columbia)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 98

    recently, Paczkowski served as ture and Marine Engineering from the provide enrolled students with a strong Senior Vice President at ICF Interna- University of British Columbia. foundation in the maritime industry tional. Henschel joins the ? rm as Vice and ? ll the current industry skills gap.

  • MN Nov-19#95  Announces 
at Northrop University in Inglewood, 
Management)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 95

    NEWS Seaspan Shipyards Clarke MacLeod Hargreaves Thomson Oliver Diaz Sandy studied aircraft maintenance Seaspan Shipyards Announces at Northrop University in Inglewood, Management Additions Seaspan Shipyards announced the ap- California and graduated as a me- pointment of James Clarke as Chief chanical

  • MN Nov-19#94  Systems at the Technical University 
of Berlin, will be)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 94

    VESSELS SCHOTTEL Delivers Propulsion for World’s First Emission-Free Pushboat eration of Maritime Systems at the Technical University of Berlin, will be equipped with rudderpropellers from SCHOTTEL. The hybrid canal push boat is powered by a combination of fuel cells, batteries and an electric motor.

  • MN Nov-19#92 VESSELS
SAFE Boats Delivers 19th Boat to FDNY
SAFE Boats)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 92

    VESSELS SAFE Boats Delivers 19th Boat to FDNY SAFE Boats International (SAFE) has delivered boats 17, 18 and 19 to the marine division of the New York Fire Department, all during the month of August. The three latest additions to the FDNY ? eet are 33’ full cabin boats, the most popular con? guration

  • MN Nov-19#85  Engineering from the University of New Hampshire 
nology)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 85

    speaker at conferences. He holds a Master’s of Science in The Peters are fervent supporters of the combined tech- Mechanical Engineering from the University of New Hampshire nology. “TrueProp, partnered with the Linden DDS and and is the regional membership chair of the Society of Naval the PropPress

  • MN Nov-19#83 measure of light bending as it passes through one medium)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 83

    measure of light bending as it passes through one medium into another), color, and absorption spectra. NOAA also states that total suspended solids (TSS) is a quantitative measure of the total dry weight mass of the particles or material present in a given amount of water. Measuring TSS is important

  • MN Nov-19#74 OFFSHORE WIND
Blount Boats also completed an 85-ft.)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 74

    OFFSHORE WIND Blount Boats also completed an 85-ft., triple-screw alu- minum ferry boat, Isle of Fire for Fire Island Ferries – the 10th vessel built for Fire Island Ferries by Blount Boats – that was delivered on June 19, 2019 and will service 386 passengers between Bay Shore and Fire Island on Great

  • MN Nov-19#73 OFFSHORE WIND
ounded in 1949, Blount Boats is a full-service)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 73

    OFFSHORE WIND ounded in 1949, Blount Boats is a full-service the Block Island Wind Farm. The boat is signi

  • MN Nov-19#72 OFFSHORE WIND
BLOUNT BOATS:BLOUNT BOATS:
Credit: Greg)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 72

    OFFSHORE WIND BLOUNT BOATS:BLOUNT BOATS: Credit: Greg Trauthwein Ferries, Offshore Wind Vessels Dominate Present, Future MarineNews recently visited the Blount Boats facility in Warren, Rhode Island. While the year 2019 might be the ‘year of the woman’ in the eyes of the International Maritime Organizatio

  • MN Nov-19#38 PROPULSION
Workboat Propulsion: 
New Advances 
Produce)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 38

    PROPULSION Workboat Propulsion: New Advances Produce Myriad Advantages Credit: Leclanche Big changes are blowing in the wind for 2019 Brown Water propulsion systems – and beyond. By Rick Eyerdam s the ? nal quarter of 2019 winds into full gear, myr- population 6,000, to the rest of Denmark. The route

  • MN Nov-19#29 merce can come to a halt in the court-
Richard Paine is a)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 29

    merce can come to a halt in the court- Richard Paine is a licensed mariner, certi? ed TSMS & AWO-RCP Lead Auditor and room. That’s because decisions made DPA with over 20 years of maritime and auditing experience ranging from deep sea, in the courtroom and even those cases tugs & towing, and passenger

  • MN Nov-19#14  still 
gan Technological University in 1990 with a Bach-
S
in)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    it’s not uncommon to ? nd our Fernstrum & Company. He graduated from Michi- GRIDCOOLER keel coolers built back in the 1950’s still gan Technological University in 1990 with a Bach- S in service today, most of those keel coolers wouldn’t meet elor of Science degree in Scienti? c and Technical Com- munications

  • MN Nov-19#8  knowledge on Arctic and  University of New Hampshire and)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    . He holds a Master’s of Sci- Continental Shelf for over 3 years. Buddy ence in Mechanical Engineering from the holds broad knowledge on Arctic and University of New Hampshire and is the Alaska maritime issues from both the regional membership chair of the Society industry’s and government’s perspective