Us Coast Guard

  • Holland America Cruises has appointed Daved F. Lauth vice president of Technical/Nautical Operations. In this new senior management position, Mr. Lauth will be responsible for the strategic planning and analysis of Holland America's technical and nautical needs as well as the coordination of technical and nautical operations with other divisions within the company.

    Mr. Lauth, a rear admiral with 31 years of service in the U.S.

    Coast Guard, enjoys a national reputation as an outstanding manager, having had the responsibility of directing the activities of over 1,400 military and c i v i l i an personnel in Hawaii, Guam, Japan, American Samoa and other locations in the Pacific Basin. During his Coast Guard career, Mr. Lauth worked to implement the National Safety Program for recreational boating. As Deputy Director for the U.S.

    Coast Guard he set policy for personnel administration on boating safety, and had active command of several Coast Guard vessels.

    Mr. Lauth holds a degree in engineering from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and a master's degree in public administration from the University of Pittsburgh.

  • Navigating through U.S. Maritime Security Requirements The U.S. Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) imposes various maritime security requirements on operating in waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. Maritime security regulations promulgated by the U.S. Coast Guard

  • Capt. Barry C. Roberts, USCG, recently assumed command of the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, Md. He becomes the 29th commanding officer in the 82-year history of the yard, the only shipbuilding and repair facility of the U.S. Coast Guard. During a recent ceremony, Rear Adm. Robert S. Lucas

  • , vice commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, will deliver the symposium's keynote address on Thursday. Technical areas to be addressed by government and industry experts from the U.S., U.K., and European continent include fast-attack-craft hull forms, hull-form hydrodynamics, special-warfare craft, combatpatrol-

  • for Compliance with IMO Voluntary Ballast Water Guidelines" and implement the IMO standards. Operators can report their ballast water treatments by using the form in the guidelines and sendingit to the nearest U.S. Coast Guard Captain of Port. For further information, contact: Lt. Jonathan C. Burton

  • , an agency within the Department of Transportation. Mr. Gaughan will be responsible for the agency's liaison with the maritime industry, overseeing Mar- Ad's public affairs activities, and, in coordination with the Office of the Secretary, contacts with the Congress on maritime

  • , and was awarded certification by the American Bureau of Shipping and the U.S. Coast Guard. Initial trials were held in Lake Pontchartrain, La. Because of its unique design, additional trials were held in Gulfport, Miss. The purpose of the trials, which are required by the U.S. Coast Guard and

  • The U.S. Coast Guard has approved Sarex oil/water separators to control polluted waters being discharged from shipboard bilges and shoreside stations. Said to be the first such certification issued by the Coast Guard for oil/water separators, it was granted to Separation and Recovery Systems, Inc.

  • The September hearing held by the House subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation centered on maritime transportation regulations and their ultimate impact on safety, security, jobs and the environment. As various industry advocates used the public venue as a vehicle to vent and for elected

  • The Tenth Naval Hydrodynamics Symposium will be held June 24-28, 1974 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. This internationally recognized symposium has been held biennially since 1956, alternately in this country and abroad. This year, the symposium is being sponsored

  • in 1979, will operate in the Gulf of Mexico deploying a large helium-filled balloon called an Aerostat, which is equipped with a sensitive radar system. Suspended as high as 2,500 feet, the radar scans the sky and the ocean to detect lowflying aircraft and surface vessels which could be carrying illegal drugs

  • largest and oldest manufacturer of fire extinguishing equipment. Aptly called "Mariner," the new portable extinguisher, engineered to handle fires caused by spills of gasoline, grease, oil, etc., has twice the firefighting capability as the common 5-B :C units on the market. Backed by Kidde's half

  • MR Jan-20#64  . . . . . . . .www.anchormarinehouston.com . . . . . . . . )
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(281) 877-6774 39 . . . . .Anchor Maine & Supply, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.anchormarinehouston.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(800) 233-8014 1 . . . . . .Bay Shipbuilding/Fincantieri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • MR Jan-20#59  APPEARS IN EVERY ISSUE OR NOT ECAUSE IT IS AN EDITORIAL SERVICE)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 59

    ADVERTISING PROGRAMS IN THIS PUBLICATION WHETHER AN . A , , , ADVERTISEMENT APPEARS IN EVERY ISSUE OR NOT ECAUSE IT IS AN EDITORIAL SERVICE UNPAID AND NOT PART OF THE ADVERTISERS CONTRACT ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY . B , , MR

  • MR Jan-20#56 .html www.udt-global.com/join-us-in-2020
OTC Asia  Breakbulk)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    Mar. 18-20 UDT Tampa, FL Singapore May 12-14 www.passengervessel.com/SitePages/ www.apmaritime.com/ Rotterdam maritrends.html www.udt-global.com/join-us-in-2020 OTC Asia Breakbulk Asia EuroMaritime Mar. 24-27 May 18-19 Feb. 4-6 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Shanghai, China Marseille, France http://2020

  • MR Jan-20#55  started in the trade show business 22  show ?  oor, and)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    When Uli Selbach started in the trade show business 22 show ? oor, and according to Selbach “we’re going to double years ago, the big question was: “Will trade shows exist in that space in 2020. We think this is a strong and growing fu- 20 years?” While the advent of virtual meetings, seamless ture

  • MR Jan-20#50  with two engines powering one 
Kyushu Electric Power Co., 
Eastern’s)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    @ 900 rpm EPA Tier 4 marine propulsion Large Coal Carrier Ordered Ferry Division. The launch took place at engines with two engines powering one Kyushu Electric Power Co., Eastern’s Allanton facility in Panama City, Reintjes DUP 3000 P combining gear and Inc. has engaged in long term Fla. The series

  • MR Jan-20#47  the ship repair and conversion busi-
(L to R): Jean-Yves Saussol)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    La Ciotat Shipyards Matière, Bardex Tapped for 4300T Shiplift In the ship repair and conversion busi- (L to R): Jean-Yves Saussol, CEO, La Ciotat Shipyards, Thomas Miller, ness there are myriad tools available CEO Bardex Corp., and Philippe to make otherwise dirty and danger- Matière, CEO, Matière.

  • MR Jan-20#44  a “fantastic year  drilling business and have accomplished)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    many maritime companies, “We start seeing recovery in the O&G works. After the successful conversions Spain’s Astican reports a “fantastic year drilling business and have accomplished carried out for the Canada’s Clearwater … one of the best in Astican´s history” several reactivation projects,” said Seafoods

  • MR Jan-20#41  issues, but if you’re 
seriously looking for a zero-emission)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    , PRESIDENT, GLOSTEN “I would love to design an all nuclear ship. I understand the cost, the red tape and the bureaucratic issues, but if you’re seriously looking for a zero-emission technology to power ocean-going vessels, nuclear should be an option.” Morgan Fanberg, President, Glosten power ocean-going

  • MR Jan-20#40 . “That was a 
our client’s businesses with engineering)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 40

    , PRESIDENT, GLOSTEN off the charts. Ultimately, the work we do here is supporting ground-based midcourse missile defense system. “That was a our client’s businesses with engineering excellence and un- massive project we did with Boeing; a hallmark project for me matched problem solving.” because of the amount

  • MR Jan-20#39 , PRESIDENT, GLOSTEN
 “The focus on electric 
propulsion)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 39

    INTERVIEW MORGAN FANBERG, PRESIDENT, GLOSTEN “The focus on electric propulsion systems and propulsion systems integration has really taken on a life of its own.” It’s Electric. Left: The Gee’s Bend Ferry. Right: The elec- tric passenger/vehicle ferry for Washington’s Skagit County. Photos:

  • MR Jan-20#37 , PRESIDENT, GLOSTEN
 “Doing business the same way over 
and)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    INTERVIEW MORGAN FANBERG, PRESIDENT, GLOSTEN “Doing business the same way over and over will not last; we know technology will advance our industry, and if we just sit back and don’t take an active role, we’re going to lose. There is no room for complacency.” Morgan Fanberg, President, Glosten @

  • MR Jan-20#35  
vessels will also need thrusters,” he said.
Maritime)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 35

    with accommodation for 112, in depths up to 68 m. Photos: A.K. Suda Naval Architects ing conversion candidates. “Installation vessels will also need thrusters,” he said. Maritime Reporter spoke with Er- win Lammertink, the CEO of Van Es Holding BV (the Netherlands parent of Jack-Up Barge, Swift Drilling

  • MR Jan-20#34 . W2W and cranes also pres-
plus to the needs of offshore)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    platform or wind turbine was crude oil’s price slide of 2014, so many vessels that are sur- identi? ed as a further necessity. W2W and cranes also pres- plus to the needs of offshore oil exploration and production ent challenges, “…they must be heave compensated…” said are potential conversion candidates

  • MR Jan-20#33  off Block 
Island, RI), the Business Network for Offshore)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 33

    accounts for a paltry 30 megawatts (MW) Photos: Island Offshore of actual power production (? ve turbines of 6 MW each off Block Island, RI), the Business Network for Offshore Wind estimates the size of that U.S. pipeline at somewhere around 8.5 gigawatts (GW) based on announced projects likely to

  • MR Jan-20#32 REPAIR & CONVERSION
Fit for
Re?  t?
While it is generally)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    REPAIR & CONVERSION Fit for Re? t? While it is generally agreed that the nascent offshore wind energy market in the U.S. will be a newbuild market, there is a repair and conversion possibility for some stacked OSVs. By Barry Parker 32 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • January 2020 MR #1 (18-33).

  • MR Jan-20#30  said of the order. The 
must be in place before you)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    to keep a high service speed Norwegian village’s little marina to realize how “the basics” in bad weather,” Hammerfest Hospital said of the order. The must be in place before you can mimic the security of town tender revealed a demand that vessels be comfortable travel- life. ling 254 km in rough seas

  • MR Jan-20#29  whalers, the Norwegians tell us, 
who ?  rst noticed that)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    REPAIR & CONVERSION It was Canadian whalers, the Norwegians tell us, who ? rst noticed that a dead whale does not bob in the waves. The carcass didn’t pitch or roll, either, and it was somehow “self-propelled” — its ? ns giv- ing it forward motion and acting as stabilizers, or foils. The story still

  • MR Jan-20#25 Obviously, the shipping industry’s primary goal should)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    Obviously, the shipping industry’s primary goal should al- The NTSB ways be to have zero lost days due to accidents. But, equally, The NTSB’s stated purpose can be found on its website: the industry should also always be prepared to immediately respond to and investigate unfortunate events when they

  • MR Jan-20#24 , includ- tation for clients because of these casualties has)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    in some of the largest mari- Our experience investigating and providing legal represen- time casualties in the last 20 years, includ- tation for clients because of these casualties has shown that, ing the Staten Island Ferry allision with a despite decades of implementing international safety pro- B maintenance

  • MR Jan-20#20  is NOT the Probable Cause
irst some disclosures.)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    Back to the Drawing Board Marine Casualties Alcohol is NOT the Probable Cause irst some disclosures. I have worked with (MAB-19/30) on an incident that occurred in Guam. I (or my the National Transportation Safety Board company) had no involvement in that matter, but since it was on a number of occasions.

  • MR Jan-20#15  all the maritime and offshore industry. Areas such as 
design)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    that we’re getting in that area from the wind mar- ket are tied to many of those similar things that we work with all the maritime and offshore industry. Areas such as design optimization opportunities within the drivetrain in the power system, to hull design optimization, to the con- ceptual approval

  • MR Jan-20#14  wind;
Is the U.S. marine industry ready to meet demand)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    O? shore Wind Q&A: Matt Tremblay, ABS The Domino Effect The next hot growth market is offshore wind; Is the U.S. marine industry ready to meet demand? he American Bureau of Shipping convened a conference to discuss the pace and direction of the U.S. offshore wind market, including challenges and opportuni

  • MR Jan-20#13  lifts and decommissioning.
So, just as it was for deepwater)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 13

    also available for both wind and petro-work, as it, too, wields a massive crane and is being marketed for offshore heavy lifts and decommissioning. So, just as it was for deepwater oil and gas innovations now helping wind, “green-only” lending is available for new wind workhorses able to ply offshore oil

  • MR Jan-20#10 . It tends to leave  leaves us with the question of how)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    a terribly inef? cient and inef- such as e-learning, but cannot be replaced by e-learning. This T fective way of teaching. It tends to leave leaves us with the question of how to structure our learning many students feeling confused, bored or gatherings to create the best possible learning outcomes