Bill Conferees

  • In conference on October 1, the Senate receded to the House on the Ready Reserve Force (RRF) provisions in the fiscal year 1992 Maritime Administration appropriations bill. This action effectively killed the Senate amendment which would have restricted RRF purchases to U.S.-flag vessels and repairs/modifications of these ships to U.S. yards (except for the three Danish ships used during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm).

    Representative Neal Smith of Iowa fought hard to defeat the amendment for strengthening the U.S. maritime industrial base. Unfortunately, the Senate conferees did not stand their ground. In addition to the U.S. industrial base issue, there is the serious question of whether or not the old foreign vessels contemplated for the RRF are capable of meeting operational readiness goals. MarAd has indicated that it does not intend to do any extensive conversion work on the ships; for example, strengthen the decks to allow them to carry more military tanks or incorporate other special design characteristics that the Army says it needs.

    In 1981, the U.S. Government terminated subsidies to U.S. yards.

    On October 1, 1991, conferees on the FY 1991 Commerce, State, and Justice Appropriations bill effect i v e l y agreed with the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s plan to use taxpayer's dollars to subsidize foreign yards instead.

    As U.S. shipyards continue to close because they cannot compete against subsidized foreign shipyards, the Maritime Administration has lobbied hard to buy ships for the RRF that have been built in subsidized foreign yards. Apparently, the Appropriation conferees agreed with MarAd that it is good policy to take advantage of the very subsidy practices which the U.S. Trade Representative has been trying to eliminate through international negotiations for more than two years— so far, without success.

    There is another irony in this situation. The subsidized ships the Administration wants to buy will do little to achieve the purpose of enhancing our nation's sealift capability.

    They are too old and too slow and lack many of the required de- sign features. As the Persian Gulf war proved, the military needs ships that have 24-knot speed capability and are maintained in a reduced operating status to ensure quick deliverability of heavy military equipment to the theater of operation.

    It was clearly demonstrated during Operation Desert Storm t h a t the ships in Mar Ad's Ready Reserve Force were not up to the task. They were old, poorly maintained, and could not be activated in a timely fashion. Thus, it took six months for the U.S. to get its equipment to the Persian Gulf. In contrast to the RRF, the Navy's seven fast sealift ships which are maintained in reduced operating status, carried 10 percent of all the cargo to the Persian Gulf. It took 71 RRF ships to carry only 20 percent of the cargo.

    The nation needs modern, efficient sealift ships, and U.S. shipyards certainly need the business.

    The policy decision of the Administration and the Appropriations conferees won't significantly improve our sealift capability, but it will further erode our shipyard industrial base.

  • Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA). Last May, the Senate approved its version of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), S. 601.  The bills will next head to conference to reconcile the two versions.  Senate leaders announced that Environment and Public Works Committee Chairwoman Barbara

  • relied upon by U.S. shipowners for more than 65 years Title XI Credit Insuranee Discontinued When the Conference Report for the Omnibus Spending Bill, which provides funding for the federal government through September 30, 2003, was released on the February 13, 2003. it was there for all to see

  • million and $20.4 million, respectively, for the Title XI program in the Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary and related agencies appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2001. The conferees on the bill finally agreed to increase funding to $30 million, well above the President's request. To meet its

  • Development Act (H.R. 6), on October 17, Joe Farrell, president of The American Waterways Operators (AWO), said that "This first omnibus waterways bill in 16 years is a remarkable achievement. The development of this legislation is the result of a constructive compromise between a large number of parties

  • Conferees from the Senate and the House of Representatives have agreed to appropriate $228.4 million in support of the Navy's Strategic Sealift Program. The money will be used to purchase additional commercial tonnage from private owners for the Ready Reserve Force, as well as to modernize and

  • as of 1 August, except as noted. 1. LEGISLATIVE ACTION House/Senate conferees in late July reached a compromise on the FY 1986 defense authorization bill. The compromise provides defense spending authority of $302.5 billion. This compares with the administration request for $322.2 billion. The Senate

  • , in late October, appropriated $900 million to fund a new fast sealift program. When added to the $375 million remaining from last year, a total of $1.3 billion is now available for initiating a major ship construction effort. High priority has suddenly been accorded sealift— and it is highly likely that

  • Although the legislation has yet to be approved, it appears that all oceangoing tankers operating within U.S. waters will have to be equipped with a double hull by 2015, according to a recent proposal by a joint House-Senate conferee committee. A joint committee made up of Congressional conferees

  • by House and Senate negotiators on funding for several maritime agencies and their programs. A Senate-House conference committee, working on a $22.1 billion appropriations measure for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary and related agencies approved spending totals for

  • overhauls are scheduled for commercial yards next year. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS Among the recent developments are action on the defense authorization bill, changes in homeport policy, issues raised about the Kitty Hawk modernization, and a proposed restriction on Navy ship repair in Japanese shipyards

  • to be the driving force for shipyards and many equipment manufacturers. Spending for ships, weapons, support equipment and maintenance exceeds $34 billion annually. Ship Procurement The Navy has requested funds to build 17 ships and lengthen two fleet oilers in Fiscal Year 1989. A budget of $9

  • MR May-19#78  environmental regulations. Bill’s previous experience includes)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 78

    for promoting environmental related services and providing guidance in support of international, national and regional marine environmental regulations. Bill’s previous experience includes Product Line Manager for the BALPURE BWMS manufactured by De Nora Water Technologies. Global Ballast Water Treatment TRENDING

  • MR May-19#69  — runs the 
ships — more than a billion dollars  2. Lower emissions)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 69

    in some cas- It takes a lot of fuel to power today’s gine hours over the same time span. That es, even scheduled downtime — runs the ships — more than a billion dollars 2. Lower emissions extends maintenance and overhaul inter- risk of losing a voyage. Engine reliability worth annually for some larger cruise

  • MN May-19#35  context of an appropriations 
bill, but for an elected representa-
)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    elected rep- resentative values knowing what is important to his or her constituents. Grant amounts might be “small” in the context of an appropriations bill, but for an elected representa- tive there is no vote that is too small. Many members of Congress provide for their constituents to communicate with

  • MN May-19#34  hubs. Speci?  cally, the bill aims to amend 
tation system)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 34

    allow greater amounts to be granted for ports, railways, They are where the gears of our nation’s freight transpor- and intermodal hubs. Speci? cally, the bill aims to amend tation system meet and mesh. Every river channel could the Nationally Signi? cant Freight and Highway Projects be dredged clean and

  • MR Apr-19#9  as that is  better. Bravo Zulu, Bill. 
edge technology, 100%)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 9

    have said it programs, hands on labs and cutting education within a state school system. believer of a public education, as that is better. Bravo Zulu, Bill. edge technology, 100% co-operative education – six months for each and every cadet, 100% membership in the Regiment of Cadets and 100% civic en- gagemen

  • MR Apr-19#8  as a shin- saying, simply, “Bill made the Marshall  Nevertheless)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    started out by been, and always will be, it’s people. ton Rose Fulbright, Poten & Partners, his maritime skill and bravery as a shin- saying, simply, “Bill made the Marshall Nevertheless, we pressed and asked him Ridgebury Tankers, Scorpio Tankers, ing example of American courage and Islands.” And,

  • MR Mar-19#12  
passed a critical energy bill called the 
“Grid Transformation)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    be- cause of cost recovery issues for DE. In 2018, however, the regulatory picture changed big-time when VA’s legislature passed a critical energy bill called the “Grid Transformation and Security Act.” This bill reset emerging renewable energy projects as being “in the public interest” an important

  • MP Q1-19#56  incident can start out-
mental bill, which expanded the pool)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 56

    For example, the 2017 APM veered away from a port-centric approach in the 2007 supple- Maersk cyberattack illustrated how an incident can start out- mental bill, which expanded the pool of eligible port applicants to side the U.S. and have a cascading impact on our ports and all entities covered by an Area

  • MR Feb-19#63  Chartering & Sales
Ask for Bill Gobel
(503) 228-8691 •)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    real estate here! Contact us today: +1 561-732-4368 Specializing In Barges • Single or Double Hull, Inland or Ocean-Going • Chartering & Sales Ask for Bill Gobel (503) 228-8691 • (800) 547-9259 2020 SW 4th Ave Suite 600 Portland, OR 97201 www.marinelink.com 6

  • MN Feb-19#57  recently  Murkowski (R-AK). The bill is cur- documentary. The)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 57

    John Garamendi (D- ate simultaneously by Senator Lisa Tom Garber, this is his 13th maritime Fairfeld, Davis, Yuba City), recently Murkowski (R-AK). The bill is cur- documentary. The fnished flm will introduced H.R. 550, the Merchant rently awaiting action by the House be an hour long and is expected to

  • MN Feb-19#44  
out interruptions, our monthly bills have been cut in half)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 44

    not Fleet One, our tugs are able to travel to remote areas with- be supported in their business plans. That might be about out interruptions, our monthly bills have been cut in half, to change. For example, coastal services start at $28 per month, $0.49 per minute for voice, and $4-5 per MB for that all

  • MN Feb-19#42  cellular coverage is routinely 
billed as seamless, so-called)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 42

    has always been the dearth of reliable and economical vessel-to-shore communications. Even T in America’s heartland where cellular coverage is routinely billed as seamless, so-called ‘dead spots’ persist. Sometimes, this happens at the worst possible moment for an opera- tor who has myriad far fung assets

  • MN Feb-19#24   
FY2019 Minibus Appropriations bill. Specifcally, these in-)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    than 60% of them outliving their funding levels for fve projects from monies provided in the intended 50-year design life. FY2019 Minibus Appropriations bill. Specifcally, these in- Locks and dams are critical infrastructure. They keep clude Olmsted (Ohio River): $50 million to fnal completion; waterways

  • MN Feb-19#21  and politically visible.  bill, Mr. Garamendi was unequivocal)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 21

    nation’s security and economy. and transit projects, which are general- gas and crude oil. In championing the ly more publicly and politically visible. bill, Mr. Garamendi was unequivocal Jeff Vogel is a member in Cozen Moreover, the BUILD Transportation in stating that the “U.S. Merchant O’Connor’s

  • MN Feb-19#18 , Manson Construction), Bill Hanson 
(VP, GLDD), Bill)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 18

    & Dock), Mark Sickles (Sr. Director, Weeks Marine), General Todd Semonite, Dan Hussin (VP, Manson Construction), Fred Paup (Chairman, Manson Construction), Bill Hanson (VP, GLDD), Bill Dutra (Owner, Dutra Group), Tom Smith (USACE), and Jay Cashman (Owner, Jay Cashman, Inc.) February 2019 MN 1

  • MN Feb-19#16  industry is amid a $1.5 billion 
Billion for dredging)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    and Gulf coasts but for dredging. sector in this regard? Congress, in 2018 alone, appropriated more than $2 The American dredging industry is amid a $1.5 billion Billion for dredging activities. Although infrastructure im- dredging feet expansion. And, I’ve encouraged my stake- provements for the United States

  • MN Feb-19#6  – something 
which DCA CEO Bill Doyle says is “good policy”)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    a dirty word. Hence, our report on the fed- eral government’s new program that pushes the ‘benefcial use of dredge materials’ – something which DCA CEO Bill Doyle says is “good policy” – starts on page 26. Also in this edition, the advent of reliable satellite communications for inland and coastal operators

  • MR Jan-19#54  ‘hybrid’ can reduce your fuel bills by as  for that quick)
    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    hybrid workboat can also use all three As a matter of full disclosure, I’d be There are a lot of reasons for that real- ‘hybrid’ can reduce your fuel bills by as for that quick towing assignment or ship the ? rst person to tell you that when it ity, and there were a lot of smart people much as 30%

  • MR Jan-19#43  price differen- Who Pays the Bill?
tials) for fuel – a ?)
    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    trades, will around in a dynamic marketplace. need to pay an extra $250/ton (a reference number in line with recent price differen- Who Pays the Bill? tials) for fuel – a ? gure Indeed, the pro? t number emerging approaching a stagger- from the income statement starts with Crowley has been a

  • MR Jan-19#4  environmental regulations. Bill’s previous experience in-)
    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    ing guidance in support of international, national and regional Maritime Academy and lead commentator of MaritimeProfes- marine environmental regulations. Bill’s previous experience in- sional.com. Additionally, he is Editor of both Maritime Logistics cludes Product Line Manager for the BALPURE BWMS manu-

  • MP Q4-18#40 , slow transit pads a pilot’s billing sheet. That may be overly)
    Nov/Dec 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 40

    that pilots are dismissive of logistical effciency; after try group based in Ontario, with American and Canadian mem- all, slow transit pads a pilot’s billing sheet. That may be overly bership, writes in its current issue of Marine Delivers magazine cynical, but it references major concerns among vessel

  • MP Q4-18#18  approaching a staggering $100 billion  competitors, who may)
    Nov/Dec 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 18

    line with recent price dif- address strategic advantages may be gained (or lost) relative to ferentials) for fuel – a fgure approaching a staggering $100 billion competitors, who may adapt different business strategies than annually – with all else held constant. Liner behemoth Maersk has their peers. Outcomes

  • MR Dec-18#13  a critical  reduction in fuel bills – and optimal ef?  ciency)
    December 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 13

    to a considerable long-term sustainability into the framework of every ves- speed loss calculation is performed. This is a critical reduction in fuel bills – and optimal ef? ciency in service sel is now a pre-requisite for every savvy shipping com- measure for understanding vessel performance and fuel

  • MN Dec-18#30  Waterways Opera- The $2.9 billion settlement fund Volkswagen)
    December 2018 - Marine News page: 30

    subM’s requirements and recommend that Workboats See ‘Biggest Bang for VW Settlement Bucks’ the USCG issue a COI. The American Waterways Opera- The $2.9 billion settlement fund Volkswagen agreed tors estimates that Sub M adds about 5,600 vessels are im- to capitalize for distribution across 50 states, tribal