Dennis L Bryant

  • Anthropogenic (manmade) sound is creating havoc among marine mammals and other aquatic species. These creatures have very sensitive hearing, which they rely on to find food and mates and (for some) to communicate and navigate. Sound waves can travel much further and with much less loss of strength in water than in air. In pre-industrial times, the oceans were relatively quiet. Sailing ships generated almost no subsurface noise. A whale’s call could be heard by another whale hundreds of miles away in ambient conditions. The substantial and growing amount and volume of anthropogenic noise in the ocean comes from a variety of sources including commercial and naval shipping, fishing, recreational craft, sonar, seismic surveying, blasting, and marine construction. Due to the volume or energy levels at which sonars and seismic surveys (such as air guns) generate their sounds, these sources seem to have the greatest immediate impact on marine mammals. Other manmade sounds, though, have long-term impacts. Cavitation from ships’ propellers now generate a ubiquitous level of noise in the ocean that can oftentimes mask natural sounds.

     
    IMO
    In 2012, the IMO adopted and made mandatory the Noise Code so as to reduce the level of noise exposure to individuals on commercial ships. The Noise Code had been preceded by noise guidelines. The Noise Code applies to new construction and the guidelines address conditions on existing vessels.
     
    In 2009, an IMO Correspondence Group, chaired by the United States, submitted an extensive report on noise from commercial shipping and its adverse impact on marine life. In 2014, the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) approved guidelines for the reduction of underwater noise from commercial shipping to address adverse impacts on marine life.
     
    These guidelines focus on the primary sources of underwater noise – those associated with propellers, hull form, onboard machinery, and operational aspects. They recognize that much, if not most, of that noise is caused by propeller cavitation. The guidelines also recognize that the largest opportunities for reduction of underwater noise will be during the initial design stage, but noise reduction is still possible for existing vessels, particularly on the occasions of propeller replacement and hull work, such as installation of a bulbous bow.
     
    NOAA
    Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published an extensive technical guide for assessing the effects of anthropogenic sound on marine mammal hearing. For decades NOAA has been conducting analysis of the sources and impacts of manmade noise in the ocean. Those studies as well as numerous others from different sources reveal that the impact of manmade noise on marine mammals and other aquatic life is pervasive.
     
    A wide-ranging NOAA report on anthropogenic noise in the marine environment, written in 2000, contains a detailed analysis of the sources of manmade noise in the ocean and its effects on marine mammals, marine fishes, and other taxa (sea turtles, flora, invertebrates, and birds). It notes that ‘quiet ship’ technology has been developed but is not widely used by the commercial sector. That may be about to change. NOAA is developing a plan for reducing anthropogenic noise in the ocean that includes proposals for rulemaking to require reductions in noise-making activities. Noise from some of these activities, such as marine construction projects, is currently regulated through the Marine Mammal Protection Act and its requirement for incidental harassment authorizations prior to commencement of projects that may result in the ‘taking’ of marine mammals. This requirement has not previously been imposed on commercial shipping.
     
    The plan under development reportedly will call for developing noise limits for a variety of sources. Regulations could build on the 2014 IMO underwater noise guidelines and set design requirements for new construction, with limited retrofit measures for existing ships. Hopefully, any such steps would be coordinated worldwide through the IMO negotiation process.
     
    Geographic Approach
    More immediate, though somewhat geographically limited, steps could be taken in the same manner as is currently done with the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale (NARW). If supported by adequate data, which does not currently exist, underwater noise standards could be established for various sections of US waters, based on the presence of certain marine life, particularly marine mammals. Ships would then be prohibited from transiting those waters while generating underwater noise above the designated level. This could force either speed reductions or the adoption of noise-reducing technologies. While any unilateral approach adopted may be enforceable within internal waters and the territorial sea, enforcement of underwater noise restrictions against foreign vessels outside the territorial sea would be problematical without IMO cooperation. The IMO in 1998 adopted a mandatory ship reporting system requested by the US government for ships transiting through waters off the east coast of the United States so as to reduce the risk of those ships striking NARWs. Subsequently, the IMO adopted or adjusted Traffic Separation Schemes (TSS) in these same waters so as to improve NARW protections. If presented with sufficient evidence and justification, the IMO may well support a mandatory underwater noise reduction measure.
     
    The marine industry should not wait to have external bodies impose potentially unrealistic standards on its operations. Rather, it should be proactive in the examination, development, and adoption of realistic measures to reduce underwater noise generation by ships. Owners should require that their new ships be designed to incorporate ‘quiet ship’ technology. Remember that it takes energy to generate noise. The less noise that a ship generates, the more efficiently it will be operating.
     
     
    The Author
    Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional.com
    t: 1 352 692 5493 
    e: dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com
     
     
    (As published in the September 2016 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News)
  • new opportunities and options that may not have occurred to the agency. Bureaucrats are referred to as public servants for a reason. About the Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • bone-headed decisions.   The oceans are increasingly crowded, just like our highways. Sailors, like drivers, must drive defensively.   The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • requires global action, principally involving the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Needless to say, this will be a heavy lift. The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Maritime Regulatory Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessiona

  • requires global action, principally involving the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions.  Needless to say, this will be a heavy lift.   The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Maritime Regulatory Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessiona

  • . We don’t know what we don’t know. While artificial intelligence is pushing the existing boundaries, stupidity and hubris are limitless!     The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • of IMO type-approved BWM systems will also garner US type-approval.  The first application for USCG type-approval has now been received.     The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • fleet, American national security and homeland security in the polar regions is at risk.   America needs icebreakers, not more talk.   The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • program to verify that the salvage and marine firefighting industry can meet its obligations will be a major step in the right direction. The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • in each of these sanctuaries or areas varies, these measures are steps in the right direction to protect this unique natural resource.     The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • be confused by the boundaries of the United States, at least for so long as it claims different territorial seas for different purposes. The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • and operators should take steps now to ensure that their biofouling management plans are adequate and are actually being followed.   The Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional

  • MR Nov-19#12 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
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Dennis Bryant)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com The Internet of Maritime Things he Internet of Maritime

  • MR Nov-19#4 .  He is a regular contribu-
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    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    Maritime Activity Reports, Inc. Paschoa Stoichevski Parker van Hemmen Poulter Bryant maritime, defense and security issues. He is a regular contribu- Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- tor to Maritime Reporter and Marine Technology Reporter. lar contributor to Maritime Reporter

  • MR Oct-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis Bryant)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com Running on Reserves The time is long overdue for Congress

  • MR Oct-19#4  Waterfront Management Advi-
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    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    © 2019 Maritime Activity Reports, Inc. Paschoa Stoichevski Parker van Hemmen Webb Bryant Guard) and serves on the NYC Waterfront Management Advi- Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- sory Board. lar contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News. Keefe Bonvento Joseph

  • MR Sep-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis Bryant)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com USCG VIDA Policy Proposal n 31 July, the US Coast od

  • MR Sep-19#4  van Hemmen
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    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    the express permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2019 Maritime Activity Reports, Inc. Roughead Paschoa Stoichevski Parker van Hemmen Bryant Merkel Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- Dana Merkel is an associate at Blank Rome LLP and prior lar contributor to Maritime Reporter

  • MT Sep-19#53  Carlo Ratti, 
Daniela Rus, Dennis Frenchman, and Andrew)
    September 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 53

    MIT and the Amster- dam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS Institute). The project is led by MIT professors Carlo Ratti, Daniela Rus, Dennis Frenchman, and Andrew Whittle. In the future, Amsterdam wants the roboats to cruise its 165 winding canals, transporting goods and people, collecting

  • MR Aug-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis Bryant)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com Recordkeeping is Serious Business n addition to fuel

  • MR Aug-19#4  $190.00  
Bryant Parker
Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    Excellence in Norfolk, VA. writer located in Aventura, Fla. In U.S.: One full year (12 issues) $110.00; two years (24 issues) $190.00 Bryant Parker Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- Barry Parker, bdp1 Consulting Ltd provides strategic and tacti- Rest of the World: lar contributor

  • MR Jul-19#49 . INSET: Tom Rice, left, and Dennis Roach of Sandia 
National)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    cameras to look for hidden wind blade damage to keep blades operational for longer and drive down the costs of wind energy. INSET: Tom Rice, left, and Dennis Roach of Sandia National Laboratories set up a crawling robot for a test inspection of a wind blade seg- ment. www.marinelink.com 49 MR #7 (42-49)

  • MR Jul-19#48  blade.” crawler project lead Dennis Roach says  ? t drones)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    and robotic businesses in a series of projects to out- with energy businesses to develop ma- might even have to replace the blade.” crawler project lead Dennis Roach says ? t drones with infrared cameras that use chines that noninvasively inspect wind These inspections have been popular that a phased array

  • MR Jul-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis Bryant)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com Maritime’s Cyber Alert or some years now, the mari- time

  • MR Jul-19#4  INFORMATION
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    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    insurance, salvage, regulatory and energy matters. Parker Bryant Barry Parker, bdp1 Consulting Ltd provides strategic and tacti- SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- cal support, including analytics and communications, to busi- In U.S.: lar contributor to

  • MN Jul-19#24 COLUMN LUBRICANTS
A partial list of sustainability improveme)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    COLUMN LUBRICANTS A partial list of sustainability improvements affected from the choice and proper application of EAL lubricants: Water quality and air emissionsReduced energy usage based on friction reductionWaste reduction from longer lasting lubricants Years of service of the equipmentUse of equipment

  • MN Jul-19#22 COLUMN LUBRICANTS
Successful Sustainability Solutions)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    COLUMN LUBRICANTS Successful Sustainability Solutions Start with … Lubricants Unappreciated, but heavily used by operators and closely regulated by the authorities, lubricants can also be a welcome part of your environmental and sustainability program. That’s right: lubricants. By Ben Bryant When it

  • MN Jul-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
Ben Bryant is Marine Market)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & Ben Bryant is Marine Market electronics and wireless tech- Manager at Klüber Lubrica- nology. He has been active in tion. A graduate of the Massa- the design, patenting and de- MarineNews chusetts Maritime Academy, velopment of a range of safety July 2019 he is a long-time

  • MN Jul-19#2 CONTENTS
MarineNews  July 2019  •  Volume 30   Number)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CONTENTS MarineNews July 2019 • Volume 30 Number 7 INSIGHTS 14 Edward C. Schwarz ABB Vice President of Sales, New Builds LUBRICANTS 22 Successful Sustainability Solutions Start with … Lubricants Unappreciated, but heavily used by operators and closely regulated by the authorities, lubricants

  • MR Jun-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis Bryant)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com Measles & Quarantine easles is a highly conta- suspect

  • MR Jun-19#4  reserves the right to refuse 
Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    or actions taken by advertisers. The Bryant Link publications for the past two years. He has extensive experi- publisher reserves the right to refuse Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- ence working on legislative and public policy issues, both at the any advertising. Contents

  • MT May-19#10  does not exist. 
By Dennis Bryant
The Automatic Identi)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 10

    virtual aids-to-navigation that provide an AIS signal to mark hazards to navigation in locations where a physical aid-to-navigation does not exist. By Dennis Bryant The Automatic Identi? cation System (AIS) was developed possibility of close encounters and the need to change course with the sole goal

  • MR May-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis Bryant)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com AIS Data he Automatic Identi? cation System (AIS) was developed

  • MR May-19#4  reserves the right to refuse 
Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    publisher assumes no respon- sibility for any misprints or claims or actions taken by advertisers. The Bryant publisher reserves the right to refuse Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- any advertising. Contents of the lar contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News

  • MN May-19#16  Gulf of Mexico, was developed 
Dennis Wilmsmeyer
by the U.S)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    waterways. The gateway known as the 8.4 mile man-made Chain of Rocks Canal, connecting Minneapo- lis to New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico, was developed Dennis Wilmsmeyer by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Without it, the Mississippi River would not be the strategic asset it is today, nor would

  • MN May-19#2  30   Number 5
INSIGHTS
16  Dennis Wilmsmeyer
 Executive)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CONTENTS MarineNews May 2019 • Volume 30 Number 5 INSIGHTS 16 Dennis Wilmsmeyer Executive Director, America’s Central Port INSURANCE 26 Risk Management on the Inland Waterways Evolves FeaturesFeatures Credit: Mike Little Is it time for P&I clubs to return to brown water? And should inland