Don Young

  • H.R. 3983, the "Maritime Transportation Antiterrorism Act of 2002," was passed by the House Transportation and Infrastructure (T & I) Committee on March 20. The legislation was introduced by the bipartisan leadership of the Transportation Committee, including: Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska), Chairman, Transportation & Infrastructure Committee; Rep. James Oberstar (DMin..), Ranking Democrat, Transportation Committee; Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.), Chairman, Coast Guard & Maritime Transportation Subcommittee; and Rep. Corrine Brown (D-Fla.), Ranking Democrat, Coast Guard Subcommittee "We thank Chairman Don Young (REnhanced Ark.) of the House T & I Committee, and Subcommittee Chairman Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.) of Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, for their leadership on moving to address maritime security," said Kurt J. Nagle, president of the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA). "We are encouraged about the $225 million authorized for Federal grants to help ports enhance seaport security, and the local flexibility provided for vessels and facilities to address terrorism at America's ports.

    AAPA strongly supports enactment of Federal legislation to address maritime security." Overall, H.R. 3983 takes a slightly different approach than the Senate bill, S.

    1214, "The Port and Maritime Security Act of 2001. " It is focused solely on terrorism and is not as detailed on planning requirements. The bill only covers areas that the Department of Transportation (DOT) determines are at risk of having a catastrophic emergency in the event of a terrorist attack. Also, because of jurisdictional limitations of the committee, the bill only focuses on DOT activities, not those of the U.S. Customs Service.

    The bill is modeled on the Oil Pollution Act. in which Congress outlined broad planning requirements but left most of the details to the discretion of DOT. Like S. 1214, it requires a family of plans, including national, area and vessel/ facility plans. H.R. 3983 calls for grants over three years totaling $225 million (less than S.1214, which over a five-year period, calls for $390 million in grants), but limits them to technology.

    The Maritime Transportation Antiterrorism Act of 2002 Port Security Section 2 of the bill creates a new subtitle VI of title 46, United States Code, to establish a comprehensive national system of antiterrorism security enhancements. Chapter 701 of this subtitle contains provisions related to port security.

    New section 70102 of title 46 requires the Coast Guard to conduct port vulnerability assessments for U.S. ports, including an assessment of the vulnerability of each facility in a port, at which there is a high risk of a catastrophic emergency. The results of the vulnerability assessments will be used to implement a national maritime transportation antiterrorism planning system, consisting of a national plan, area plans, as well as vessel, facility, and port terminal plans, to deter a catastrophic emergency to the maximum extent practicable.

    Section 70103 requires that vessel and facility antiterrorism plans be submitted for approval to the Coast Guard, by vessels and facilities involved in a cata- strophic emergency. The Coast Guard may also require each operator of a vessel or facility to implement interim security measures until their antiterrorism plan is approved. The Coast Guard will integrate the local vessel and facility antiterrorism plans into area and national plans, with the advice of local harbor safety committees.

    Section 70104 requires the Coast Guard to cooperate with the Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency to coordinate maritime terrorism response actions. This section also requires the Coast Guard to develop a system of terrorism response for vessels. Section 70106 establishes Coast Guard maritime antiterrorism teams to protect vessels, ports, facilities, and cargo on United States' waters. Section 70107 allows the Under Secretary of Transportation for Security to provide financial assistance for enhanced facility security to implement a maritime antiterrorism plan approved by the Coast Guard or an interim measure required by the Coast Guard. For each of fiscal years 2003, 2004, and 2005, $75 million is authorized for the grants. Section 70108-70110 requires that the Coast Guard assess the effectiveness of the antiterrorism measures maintained at foreign ports from which vessels depart on a voyage to the U.S. or which pose a high risk of terrorism to the U.S.

    By no later than June 30, 2003, new section 701 1 1 requires the Under Secretary of Security, in consultation with the Transportation Security Oversight Board, to develop and maintain an antiterrorism cargo identification and screening system for containerized cargo shipped to and from the U.S. directly or via a foreign port.

    Coast Guard Authority To Control Vessels In U.S. Territorial Waters Section 3 of the bill amends the Port and Waterways Safety Act to require all vessels entering the 12-mile territorial sea of the United States to provide notice to the Coast Guard 96 hours before entering those waters.

    This section also clarifies that the Coast Guard has the authority to direct the safe operations of all vessels in the 12-mile territorial sea and other navigable waters of the U.S. during hazardous circumstances.

    Extension Of Coast Guard Jurisdiction This section would extend the jurisdiction of the Coast Guard from three miles from shore to 12 miles from shore for certain security activities when the President determines that national security is endangered.

    Section 4 also creates civil penalties not to exceed $25,000 for each violation of a Coast Guard order.

    Assignment Of Sea Marshals Section 7 of this bill amends the Ports and Waterways Safety Act to allow the dispatch of properly trained and qualified armed Coast Guard personnel, commonly called "sea marshals," on facilities and vessels to deter or respond to acts of terrorism.

    Automatic Identification System (AIS) This section requires that all vessels built after December 31, 2002, be equipped with a position indicating transponder and an appropriate situation display for accessing the information made available by the transponder system.

  • Rep. Don Young (R-Ark.) has taken over the helm of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, after chairing the Resources Committee for the past six years. In one of his first acts as Chairman, on January 31, 2001, Chairman Young announced the new subcommittee Chairmen for the Transportation

  • and threats. In fact, in a Wall Street Journal article "Coast Guard Braces for Fight," (WSJ, Wednesday, June 26, 2002, page A4), Alaska GOP Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska), is News quoted as saying that Congress will alter those Coast Guard missions "over my dead body." When the stakes are billions and

  • vessel maintenance, repair, and reconfiguration market. Vigor also hopes to expand employment there from 160 to 300 in the next two years.  Congressman Don Young will be in Ketchikan on March 26, 2013 to dedicate the new ship production facilities at the Ketchikan Shipyard.  Adam Beck, President, Alaska Ship

  • , direction and they were entrepreneurs,” said Faber in assessing how he came to love the maritime business. “Other than that, I really don’t have one specific mentor. In general, I am very open and receptive to ideas, I’m a good listener, and I like to learn from others and

  • He limited his presentation to a series of slides explaining Coast Guard plans and acknowledged one hostile question—" Why should we pay for service we don't want?"—with the suggestion, "Talk to your Congressman." The president of Biehl & Co., Don Waheed, charged that the nation's competitive position

  • The A.L. Don Company of Matawan, N.J., has developed a greatly improved version of its pilot ladder which now features steps which can be quickly and easily replaced aboard ship. The steps are held in place by a mechanical clamp instead of hand serving. As a result, a step can be replaced onboard

  • An increase in the number of vessels under American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) classification during 1976 was reported by Robert T. Young, ABS chairman and president, at the annual meeting of members of the international ship classification society, held at its New York City headquarters on March 15.

  • larger, mainstream ships is the point of focus, as Doulis explains.“In the expedition sector, the ship is not the focus, the destination is the focus. Don’t get me wrong, the expedition cruise ships are functional and beautiful, but we don’t have water slides, we don’t have ice rinks

  • . The first LNG vessel built in the United States, the ABSclassed LNG Aquarius, was delivered in June, and is in service between Japan and Indonesia. During the first half of 1977, the society classed 46 tankers — 20 of which are VLCCs—73 bulk carriers, 33 general cargo vessels, and eight

  • N u c l e a r - p o w e r e d merchant ships will sail the oceans by 1990, says Robert T. Young, chairman and president of the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS). Addressing a meeting of the Hong Kong Shipowners Association in Hong Kong, Mr. Young said that "the operating record of the nuclear

  • "As we approach and enter the next century, it is my conviction that it will be an era of vitality for the marine industry as mankind turns increasingly to the sea for energy, minerals, food, and entertainment, as well as for transportation and petroleum," says Robert T. Young, president of The

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  • MR Nov-19#68  hot topic within walls of  don’t see trans-ocean journeys)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    and cyber risk has solutions for speci? c, local routes. “I the future.” commercial approach, developing busi- proven another hot topic within walls of don’t see trans-ocean journeys made by ness strategy and bringing in business is all maritime insurers. autonomous ships anytime soon, but that Full

  • MR Nov-19#66 VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE &)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 66

    VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE & COUNSEL, AMERICAN P&I CLUB Trailblazer Boriana Farrar is a familiar face in maritime circles, the Vice President and Counsel and a Senior Claims Executive and Business Develop- ment Director for the Americas at the Ship Owners Claims Bureau, Inc.

  • MR Nov-19#36  Transporting Cargo: “If you don’t 
safely transport cargo)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    out. There’s no in between. And you have to be 100 percent responsible for your actions and for your inactions.” • Safely Transporting Cargo: “If you don’t safely transport cargo, you don’t have a place in our industry. • Service To Customers: “Everything is about customer service.” • Support the Crew:

  • MN Nov-19#95  en- Canada to join Thomson-Gordon 
vironments. Clarke brings)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 95

    years of senior ? nance experi- cal seal manufacturer, he returned to U.S. Congressman ence in engineering and industrial en- Canada to join Thomson-Gordon vironments. Clarke brings his strong Ltd, founded by his grandfather in Elijah Cummings background in strategic ? nance to 1911. Over time, Sandy’s

  • MT Oct-19#64 Index page MTR Oct19:MTR Layouts  10/10/2019  9:32 AM)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 64

    Index page MTR Oct19:MTR Layouts 10/10/2019 9:32 AM Page 1 Advertiser Index PageCompany WebsitePhone# 43 . . . . .Aero Tec Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.atlinc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(800) 526-5330 11 . . . . .Airmar Technology

  • MR Oct-19#53 HISTORY DESIGN EVOLUTION
designers. As the redesign cycle)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 53

    HISTORY DESIGN EVOLUTION designers. As the redesign cycle wound down the Canadian Arctic heated up. Ice class vessels were in demand and unique designs appeared on the drawing boards of many Vancouver companies. Concurrently, Robert Allan Ltd began working for Singapore shipyards and owners designing

  • MR Oct-19#50 HISTORY DESIGN EVOLUTION
Ken FitzGerald is a Principal at)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    HISTORY DESIGN EVOLUTION Ken FitzGerald is a Principal at Glosten, a full-service marine consulting and design ? rm headquartered in Seattle, Washington. Ken has nearly 30 years of international marine experience, with broad engineering and design expertise, extensive ? eld survey work, and offshore

  • MR Oct-19#49  circumnavigations have 
donation to an organization)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    , Mari- it should never be forgotten that the fast- time Reporter & Engineering News has agreed to make a small est waterborne circumnavigations have donation to an organization of my been achieved with sailboats. Not steam- choice. For this column I nominate ships, not diesel ships, not nuclear ships

  • MR Oct-19#37  and C-Job were 
yourself, I don’t think it gives you the)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    reduction laboration. If you’re throw- solutions gains steam throughout the ing up fences to protect maritime world, Faber and C-Job were yourself, I don’t think it gives you the pioneers. “When we started the business best future,” said Faber. “We believe in in 2007, there were no projects for LNG

  • MR Oct-19#36  on  “Other than that, I really don’t have one  But the young)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    . with another naval architecture ? rm. fact, I remember going with my parents business in the Americas, with an eye on “Other than that, I really don’t have one But the young man with the big dreams to a university to explore naval architec- Asia and Australia in the future. “But we speci? c mentor

  • MR Oct-19#35 MARINE DESIGN  BASJAN FABER, CEO, C-JOB
C-Job CEO &)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 35

    MARINE DESIGN BASJAN FABER, CEO, C-JOB C-Job CEO & Cofounder Basjan Faber Born to Design Born and raised on the water by entrepreneurial parents, Basjan Faber knew from a young age that his future and fate was in mari- time, speci? cally ship design. Today the CEO leads a vibrant, di- verse and fast-growi

  • MR Oct-19#8  a 
maritime training practic-
done correctly. Here’s how)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    at an advanced initiative to study global tency, correct? Well, no – not if it is level, 4 ? re? ghting PPE questions at a maritime training practic- done correctly. Here’s how. A Simple Example basic level, and so on – depending on es, investment and thought Let’s consider a PPE exam. For sim- the

  • MR Oct-19#6  are attacking the task with abandon. 40 to 41 is always a crowd)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    from pages Frank Covella covella@marinelink.com +1 561 732 1659 better, and without a doubt they collectively are attacking the task with abandon. 40 to 41 is always a crowd pleaser. Mike Kozlowski kozlowski@marinelink.com +1 561 733 2477 While I certainly haven’t been here for all eight

  • MN Sep-19#56  is the ?  rst female to 
Don Hamadyk, Director, Research)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 56

    ? ce as ber the next CEO, effective October Executive Control Board (ECB) a Senior Purchaser on 1 April 2019. 16, 2019. Lefeber is the ? rst female to Don Hamadyk, Director, Research Matthew adds a wealth of industry ex- be selected for this top leadership role and Development at Huntington In- perience

  • MN Sep-19#52   Fabrikant Brill  Craven Wheldon 
supply chain, services)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 52

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Widener Rheault Shepherd Fabrikant Brill Craven Wheldon supply chain, services, and commercial Seacor Holdings Acquires Widener Joins The American organizations. Shepherd brings with All Shares of Sea-Vista Equity Underwriters SEACOR Holdings announced that The American

  • MN Mar-19#56 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Foti Kirby acquires Cenac assets)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 56

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Foti Kirby acquires Cenac assets Greg Beers, BHGI Middlebrook Sydney, Australia to be their exclu- substantial increase in the number tomary closing conditions, including sive North American vessel design of Vigor employees who will be liv- regulatory approvals under the Hart- represe

  • MN Mar-19#44 .  tigations, through research done by our other DOT col-
46)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 44

    itself. as everybody else. We know that – through casualty inves- In truth, the Coast Guard had little to say about the matter. tigations, through research done by our other DOT col- 46 CFR part 16.230(f)(2) requires the Commandant to set leagues – that drugs and alcohol are a signifcant safety risk.” the

  • MN Mar-19#35  COMPANY PROFILE
Hometown boy done good.
A self-made man)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    TOWING COMPANY PROFILE Hometown boy done good. A self-made man, the late Capt. Beau Payne was a Miami River Rat who worked his way from rags to riches. “We grew up poor,” said Cathy. “Our mom was a barmaid. Beau was drawn to the water, instinctively, fshing the canals fshing near our frst Miami home.

  • MN Mar-19#34 TOWING COMPANY PROFILE
“Heidi and Isabella are shrewd and)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 34

    TOWING COMPANY PROFILE “Heidi and Isabella are shrewd and intelligent women with strong business sense … I believe in them and have put my reputation on the line for them. I want this to work. I’m in it to win it.” – John Tomlinson, operations director at P&L Towing ming over the side,” said Isabella.

  • MR Sep-19#25 V
VOICES: DAVIDE BREVIGLIERI, CEO, AZIMUT YACHTS do)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    V VOICES: DAVIDE BREVIGLIERI, CEO, AZIMUT YACHTS do BRAZIL few boatyard hubs in Brazil “Santa Catarina was the state more lightness, better navigability, volume scaling and chosen for the largest concentration of suppliers, logistics, stability. Reducing the boat’s weight enables the brand to security

  • MT Jul-19#80 Index page MTR JULYAUG19:MTR Layouts  8/8/2019  2:22 PM)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 80

    Index page MTR JULYAUG19:MTR Layouts 8/8/2019 2:22 PM Page 1 Advertiser Index PageCompany WebsitePhone# 55 . . . . .Blue Robotics Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.bluerobotics.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(310) 620-3080 31 . . . . .Blueprint Subsea .

  • MT Jul-19#72  manufactured primarily for 
London is arguably the world’s)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 72

    systems, video inspection systems and The Oceanology International exhibition held every second year in control systems manufactured primarily for London is arguably the world’s largest and best gathering point for the the oceanographic, nuclear and defense in- subsea industry, a conduit for the exchange

  • MT Jul-19#20  and 
foundation and private donations and   pressing problems)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 20

    each year of from government grants and contracts, solutions to some of the world’s most the new crop of students, scientists and foundation and private donations and pressing problems in and around its wa- engineers that are dedicated to helping industry contracts, and has an annual terways. This was