Joseph Keefe

  • When dealing with the environmental lobby, there’s really only one thing you need to know.
     

    The nautical definition of middle ground is a length of comparatively shallow water having channels on both sides. In everyday language, we might call it a position of compromise between two opposing views or parties. That’s typically what reasonable folks try to achieve when resolving disputes or disagreements.
    For some in the environmental lobby, however, there’s no such thing as middle ground. And, there never will be. The sooner the maritime industry and its oil & gas cousins wake up to this reality, the better.
    I must admit that I am increasingly not a fan of the environmental lobby. That’s not to say I don’t support some of its collective goals and missions. I do. I’m just not a fan of their increasingly militant and dangerous methods. Just this week, oil major Statoil is reporting that Greenpeace activists had boarded the Transocean Spitsbergen, a drilling rig positioned about 300 kilometers offshore in the North Sea. The appalling photos of protesters dangling via ropes and wires off the side of structure left me wondering who and what they might have endangered as they “peacefully” boarded the rig.
    This high profile event follows another attempt to disrupt the marine delivery of Russian oil in the port of Rotterdam, where, in this case, they were eventually foiled by local authorities. And, of course, there is the heavily reported case of the ‘Arctic 30’ which involves a group of Greenpeace protesters that were charged with piracy after their ship, Arctic Sunrise, was seized by security forces after a protest at a Russian oil rig.
    Reasonable people can sit down and discuss a particular issue and come to a reasonable agreement about what should be done. In the case of the typical environmental activist, however, there will never be enough done by their corporate ‘opponents,’ no improvement in performance will ever suffice and nothing short of complete capitulation of anyone and everyone in their collective way will be tolerated. And, if along the way, this brings peril to those which they target for protest, well, that’s just the way it is.
    The irony of the three incidents chronicled above is that in each case, it wouldn’t have taken much to have created a casualty that would have resulted in far more serious environmental or safety consequences than the protesters themselves hope that their actions will avoid. That a casualty did not occur is a tribute to the professionalism of all of the rig and tanker crews involved. In the ongoing case of the drilling rig Transocean Spitsbergen, Statoil reports that about one-half of the activists have now given up and left the rig voluntarily. As of this morning, Statoil was literally bending over backwards to be gracious in their treatment of the seven activists remaining on the rig, while also expressing great concern for the safety of the rig and all on board. It’s unfortunate that they cannot expect the same in return for their uninvited ‘guests.’
    In a prepared statement, Statoil said, “We are pleased that some of the activists have given up and have chosen to leave the rig voluntarily, but we are still concerned for the safety of those remaining on the rig. Greenpeace has gained the attention they generally seek, and we have encouraged them not to challenge safety any longer. Statoil respects the right for legal protests and believes it is important with a democratic debate on the oil industry. Statoil has had a dialogue with Greenpeace over the last few months. We have informed about our exploration plans in the Barents Sea and the emergency response setup for the operations on several occasions, and Greenpeace has been given the opportunity to explain their views and ask questions.”
    The statement went on to say, “For Statoil the safety of people and the environment is the first priority, and we do not want activity that can increase the risk level. Greenpeace has been explained the risk associated with actions against a rig in open waters. When they still use this form of protest we believe they act irresponsibly and illegally.” And, while Statoil has followed all of the legal steps necessary to carry out their business, it is clear that the protesters have not.
    Closer to home, other activists often point to the poor performance of a domestic oil and maritime industry, while conveniently forgetting that this same business sector has improved its environmental footprint measurably, with oil spill volumes from tank vessels into US waters reduced by 99% since the early 1970s. In the last decade alone, spillage has been reduced by 76%. All sectors of the marine and oil & gas sectors continue even today to improve on that enviable performance. Not good enough, the activists will say.
    A good bargain can be defined as one in which both parties come away from the table, each a little bit unsatisfied. That doesn’t mean the perfect solution can’t be a part of that equation. It’s just very unlikely when we are talking about the realities of modern commerce, logistics and the requirements of a demanding global society. In a perfect world, engines would put out no emissions whatsoever and not even a single drop of oil would ever be spilled. But, even protesters have to burn fossil fuel on their way to work.
    Statoil’s actions and statements in the wake of the latest attack on their operations are admirable, responsible and measured in their delivery. Taking the high road, they’re also firmly anchored in the ideal position of compromise. In this case, however – and I suppose that they already know this – there’s no middle ground to be had. And, there never will be. From my chair, it is futile to negotiate as long as that’s the case. Beyond this, negotiating with someone who routinely puts your people, assets – and yes, the environment itself – into grave danger, is out of the question. 


    Excerpted from a May 28, 2014 post by Joseph Keefe on
    MaritimeProfessional.com

    Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com. Additionally, he is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He can be reached at jkeefe@maritimeprofessional.com or at Keefe@marinelink.com. MaritimeProfessional.com is the largest business networking site devoted to the marine industry. Each day thousands of industry professionals around the world log on to network, connect, and communicate.

     

    (As published in the June 2014 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter)
     

  • On a beautiful Autumn afternoon in Charleston, SC last month, MarineNews Editor Joseph Keefe had the good fortune to attend the christening on the nation’s first dual purpose, rapid response vessel and pilot launch. As the first vessel to be designed for offshore salvage and firefighting requirements

  • if we sent abroad a little bit of energy and brought home a few soldiers? I’ll take my chances on lifting the export ban. What about you? - MarPro   Joseph Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com, and is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He can be reached

  • you are not. In the middle of the biggest shipping and maritime revival on these shores in the past 50 years, this is simply no time to find out.   Joseph Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com, and is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He can be reached

  • When the time comes to pull an edition together, sometimes the content simply takes on a life of its own, as is the case with the July 2014 edition and the proliferation of ‘gas’ throughout. While the advent of gas and all that this little word encompasses is hardly breaking news, to put it in context we

  • important. I myself prefer to stay out of the eye of any storm – real, imagined or metaphorical. And, that’s just what I intend to do. – MarPro Joseph Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com. Additionally, he is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He

  • John R. Walbridge has been reelected chairman of the board of the American Institute of Marine Underwriters ( A I M U ) . Elected along with Mr. Walbridge (senior vice president of The Insurance Company of North America) were: Edward K. Trowbridge, deputy chairman (senior executive vice president

  • latest case studies in this evolving technology • Improve your understanding of the challenges ahead and available solutions Roundtable Chairman: Joseph Keefe, Editor, Maritime Professional Panelists: Mahinde Abeynaike, Managing Director, Bomin Linde LNG Aziz Bamik, General Manager, GTT North America Hol

  • I couldn’t possibly kick off this edition of MarineNews without first acknowledging – and applauding – the passage of the long-awaited, much needed Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA). Signed into law by the President on June 10th, the bill gives the domestic waterfront a much improved

  • EBDG’s LNG bunkering barge design receives ABS approvals as the maritime industry increasingly looks to LNG as a fuel of the future. In early June, Federal Maritime Commissioner William P. Doyle told listeners at an LNG Bunkering conference in Vancouver, Canada that “Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) bunkering

  • 100m gt strong, International Registries and the Republic of the Marshall Islands Registry prove that quality and safety are not mutually exclusive. When International Registries, Inc. and its affiliates (IRI) and Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) Registry recently pushed through 100 million gross

  • On June 4 2012, Deputy Maritime Administrator Paul “Chip” Jaenichen was named Acting Maritime Administrator. With the U.S. Maritime Administration since July 2012 when he was appointed Deputy Maritime Administrator by President Obama, Jaenichen would no doubt like to be confirmed as the Administrator; sooner

  • MN Jun-19#3rd Cover  a similarly good f  t. 
By Joseph Keefe
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    June 2019 - Marine News page: 3rd Cover

    in challenging conditions. It’s no wonder that their recent deal to replace an aging maintenance crane was also a similarly good f t. By Joseph Keefe hen Advance Marine recently delivered a telescopic slightly greater reach and lifting capacity, Advance Marine, boom crane to New York State Canals

  • MN Jun-19#6  our Apps
iPhone & Android
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    June 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    but two entries in this market. What we found out is de? nitely a ‘page turner.’ That’s your cue to do just that. Download our Apps iPhone & Android Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink.com SUBSCRIBE Subscribe to the print or electronic edition of at www.marinelink.com/renewsubscr/Renew04/subscribe.html

  • MN Jun-19#4 .com
Editor
Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    C. O’Malley • jomalley@marinelink.com 6 Editor’s Note Associate Publisher & Editorial Director Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com 8 Authors & Contributors Tel: 704-661-8475 Web Editor Eric Haun • haun@marinelink.com 10 BY THE NUMBERS Contributing Writers

  • MN Jun-19#2 , USMI’s core values of 
By Joseph Keefe
Family, Integrity and)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    in challenging 38 USMI: 35 Years & Going Strong conditions. It’s not hard to see why. Spanning 35 exciting years, USMI’s core values of By Joseph Keefe Family, Integrity and Quality have served the ? rm and its military customers well. The next 35 promise to be just SHORTSEA CRANE OPERATIONS

  • MR Jun-19#52  fuel 
cell vessels”
Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO 
of Golden)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a recognized expert on maritime hydrogen. than compressed hydrogen gas. Because

  • MR Jun-19#50  The Next Big Thing?
By Joseph DiRenzo, PE
Hydrogen Fuel)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

  • MR Jun-19#26  News’ Annual Yearbook, Joseph Keefe, editor of 
sister-publicati)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    regulatory environment and new opportunities. Anything but boring; and within the pages of Maritime Reporter’ & Engineering News’ Annual Yearbook, Joseph Keefe, editor of sister-publication MarineNews, takes a deep dive into the issues driving the domestic waterfront. for clean air improvements in large

  • MR Jun-19#4  Rome’s Washington, D.C.,  Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    permission of the publisher. Bondareff Keefe Copyright © 2019 Maritime Activity Joan Bondareff is of counsel in Blank Rome’s Washington, D.C., Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Reports, Inc. of? ce who focuses her practice on marine transportation, envi- Maritime Academy and

  • MR Jun-19#2  hydrogen as a maritime fuel
By Joseph DiRenzo, PE
Incat Crowther
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2

    of global maritime training practices, year two By Greg Trauthwein © Aytug Askin/Adobe Stock 50 Hydrogen Rules The future of hydrogen as a maritime fuel By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Incat Crowther MR #6 (1-9).indd 2 6/4/2019 8:41:03 A

  • MT Apr-19#23  kills faster, causing a  said Joseph Gaydos, senior author)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 23

    and when you add a higher tempera- stars keep urchins under control,” ture to that, it kills faster, causing a said Joseph Gaydos, senior author on bigger impact.” the paper and director of UC Davis’ Fisheries depend on nearshore kelp SeaDoc Society program. “Without forests to form a healthy environmen

  • MR May-19#8  
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OPENING SHOT
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    O OPENING SHOT Joseph Keefe Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the editor of both Maritime Logistics Professional and MarineNews magazines. He can be reached at jkeefe@maritimeprofessional.com INFRASTRUCTURE ‘101’ Part II “… U.S. Infrastructure Needs More

  • MR May-19#4  and handling. 
Keefe Rusch
Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    is MR’s correspondent in Germany. One full year (12 issues) $189.00; two years $228.00 (24 issues) including postage and handling. Keefe Rusch Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Mathias Rusch, Director of the Marine business unit at SKF. Email: mrcirc@marinelink.com Maritime

  • MN May-19#28  professional capabilities.” 
– Joseph Hughes, Chairman & Chief)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    outreach has been related to this, and will continue to form an important part of the overall spectrum of the Club’s professional capabilities.” – Joseph Hughes, Chairman & Chief Executive Of cer, The American Club age” P&I cover with hull and other insurances such as MEL, commercial underwriter than

  • MN May-19#26  welcome them home?
By Joseph Keefe
A mass exodus from)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    brings with it a fresh look at how to manage risk. Is it time for P&I clubs to return to brown water? And should inland operators welcome them home? By Joseph Keefe A mass exodus from the inland marine sector by P&I clubs in the mid-1990’s was precipitated by many things. Today, these very same vessels have

  • MN May-19#6  our Apps
iPhone & Android
Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    just imagine those project cargoes shown on page 38 coming up river with an unvetted foreign mariner at the helm. Download our Apps iPhone & Android Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink.com SUBSCRIBE Subscribe to the print or electronic edition of at www.marinelink.com/renewsubscr/Renew04/subscribe.html

  • MN May-19#4 .com
Editor
Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    C. O’Malley • jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher & Editorial Director 6 Editor’s Note Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com Tel: 704-661-8475 8 Authors & Contributors Web Editor Eric Haun • haun@marinelink.com Contributing Writers Susan Buchanan

  • MN May-19#2  Moving on Your Waterway?
By Joseph Keefe
  Conventional wisdom)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    Little Is it time for P&I clubs to return to brown water? And should inland operators welcome them home? 36 What’s Moving on Your Waterway? By Joseph Keefe Conventional wisdom points to the usual bulk cargoes. That may be true, but project cargoes involve big lifts and even bigger issues. SAFETY By

  • MP Q1-19#38  
and safety
Edited by Joseph Keefe
erminal Petikemas Semarang)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 38

    CONTAINER HANDLING EQUIPMENT KONECRANES Automated RTG System points the way to the future of terminal ef?ciency and safety Edited by Joseph Keefe erminal Petikemas Semarang (TPKS) in Semarang, Central ?eet of ARTG cranes to 20, with the earlier ARTGs already op- Java, is the second-largest container

  • MP Q1-19#16  planning to fail.’ 
By Joseph Keefe
utomation is not a)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    Your Technology Compete in Today’s Terminal Operating Landscape? When it comes to terminal automation, ‘failing to plan means planning to fail.’ By Joseph Keefe utomation is not a one-size-?ts all solution. And, Tideworks is one of the bigger TOS providers in industry today. while future terminal operations

  • MP Q1-19#8  that straight to the bank.
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    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 8

    , for today’s container nta ainer ports, tomorrow’s game won’t be won using yesterday’s technology. olo ogy. You can take that straight to the bank. Joseph Keefe, Editor | keefe@marinelink.com 8 Maritime Logistics Professional March/April 2019 |

  • MP Q1-19#6  and safety.     
Edited By Joseph Keefe
6   Maritime Logistics)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 6

    Parker 38 Container Handling Equipment Konecranes Automated RTG System points the way to the future of terminal ef?ciency and safety. Edited By Joseph Keefe 6 Maritime Logistics Professional March/April 2019 |

  • MP Q1-19#4 .com
Email
 
Editor
Joseph Keefe
keefe@marinelink.com
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    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    +1 212 477 6700 2 New York, NY 10010 USA +1 212 254 6271 Fax 3 URL www.MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com trauthwein@marinelink.com Email Editor Joseph Keefe keefe@marinelink.com +1 704 661 8475 4 Contributing Writers 5 William P. Doyle Rick Eyerdam Patricia Keefe 6 Barry Parker William Stoichevski Publisher J

  • MP Q1-19#2   The Future of TOS   By Joseph Keefe
20 Insights  Using)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 2

    2020 By Alok Sharma 14 Insights Transportation Industry Outlook 2019 By Mike Birge and Steve Bojan 16 Terminal Automation The Future of TOS By Joseph Keefe 20 Insights Using Technology to Streamline Operations in Container Shipping By Alexander Buchmann 43 Tech File Container xChange: matchmakers

  • MR Apr-19#9  
? rst Maritime Administrator, Joseph P. 
Kennedy. First year)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 9

    building of the Massachusetts Mari- time Academy – there is a plaque that commemorates the words of the nation’s ? rst Maritime Administrator, Joseph P. Kennedy. First year MMA cadets are required to memorize it. It reads simply, “You can have a Merchant Marine with ? rst class men even if they