Joseph Keefe

  • When dealing with the environmental lobby, there’s really only one thing you need to know.
     

    The nautical definition of middle ground is a length of comparatively shallow water having channels on both sides. In everyday language, we might call it a position of compromise between two opposing views or parties. That’s typically what reasonable folks try to achieve when resolving disputes or disagreements.
    For some in the environmental lobby, however, there’s no such thing as middle ground. And, there never will be. The sooner the maritime industry and its oil & gas cousins wake up to this reality, the better.
    I must admit that I am increasingly not a fan of the environmental lobby. That’s not to say I don’t support some of its collective goals and missions. I do. I’m just not a fan of their increasingly militant and dangerous methods. Just this week, oil major Statoil is reporting that Greenpeace activists had boarded the Transocean Spitsbergen, a drilling rig positioned about 300 kilometers offshore in the North Sea. The appalling photos of protesters dangling via ropes and wires off the side of structure left me wondering who and what they might have endangered as they “peacefully” boarded the rig.
    This high profile event follows another attempt to disrupt the marine delivery of Russian oil in the port of Rotterdam, where, in this case, they were eventually foiled by local authorities. And, of course, there is the heavily reported case of the ‘Arctic 30’ which involves a group of Greenpeace protesters that were charged with piracy after their ship, Arctic Sunrise, was seized by security forces after a protest at a Russian oil rig.
    Reasonable people can sit down and discuss a particular issue and come to a reasonable agreement about what should be done. In the case of the typical environmental activist, however, there will never be enough done by their corporate ‘opponents,’ no improvement in performance will ever suffice and nothing short of complete capitulation of anyone and everyone in their collective way will be tolerated. And, if along the way, this brings peril to those which they target for protest, well, that’s just the way it is.
    The irony of the three incidents chronicled above is that in each case, it wouldn’t have taken much to have created a casualty that would have resulted in far more serious environmental or safety consequences than the protesters themselves hope that their actions will avoid. That a casualty did not occur is a tribute to the professionalism of all of the rig and tanker crews involved. In the ongoing case of the drilling rig Transocean Spitsbergen, Statoil reports that about one-half of the activists have now given up and left the rig voluntarily. As of this morning, Statoil was literally bending over backwards to be gracious in their treatment of the seven activists remaining on the rig, while also expressing great concern for the safety of the rig and all on board. It’s unfortunate that they cannot expect the same in return for their uninvited ‘guests.’
    In a prepared statement, Statoil said, “We are pleased that some of the activists have given up and have chosen to leave the rig voluntarily, but we are still concerned for the safety of those remaining on the rig. Greenpeace has gained the attention they generally seek, and we have encouraged them not to challenge safety any longer. Statoil respects the right for legal protests and believes it is important with a democratic debate on the oil industry. Statoil has had a dialogue with Greenpeace over the last few months. We have informed about our exploration plans in the Barents Sea and the emergency response setup for the operations on several occasions, and Greenpeace has been given the opportunity to explain their views and ask questions.”
    The statement went on to say, “For Statoil the safety of people and the environment is the first priority, and we do not want activity that can increase the risk level. Greenpeace has been explained the risk associated with actions against a rig in open waters. When they still use this form of protest we believe they act irresponsibly and illegally.” And, while Statoil has followed all of the legal steps necessary to carry out their business, it is clear that the protesters have not.
    Closer to home, other activists often point to the poor performance of a domestic oil and maritime industry, while conveniently forgetting that this same business sector has improved its environmental footprint measurably, with oil spill volumes from tank vessels into US waters reduced by 99% since the early 1970s. In the last decade alone, spillage has been reduced by 76%. All sectors of the marine and oil & gas sectors continue even today to improve on that enviable performance. Not good enough, the activists will say.
    A good bargain can be defined as one in which both parties come away from the table, each a little bit unsatisfied. That doesn’t mean the perfect solution can’t be a part of that equation. It’s just very unlikely when we are talking about the realities of modern commerce, logistics and the requirements of a demanding global society. In a perfect world, engines would put out no emissions whatsoever and not even a single drop of oil would ever be spilled. But, even protesters have to burn fossil fuel on their way to work.
    Statoil’s actions and statements in the wake of the latest attack on their operations are admirable, responsible and measured in their delivery. Taking the high road, they’re also firmly anchored in the ideal position of compromise. In this case, however – and I suppose that they already know this – there’s no middle ground to be had. And, there never will be. From my chair, it is futile to negotiate as long as that’s the case. Beyond this, negotiating with someone who routinely puts your people, assets – and yes, the environment itself – into grave danger, is out of the question. 


    Excerpted from a May 28, 2014 post by Joseph Keefe on
    MaritimeProfessional.com

    Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com. Additionally, he is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He can be reached at jkeefe@maritimeprofessional.com or at Keefe@marinelink.com. MaritimeProfessional.com is the largest business networking site devoted to the marine industry. Each day thousands of industry professionals around the world log on to network, connect, and communicate.

     

    (As published in the June 2014 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter)
     

  • On a beautiful Autumn afternoon in Charleston, SC last month, MarineNews Editor Joseph Keefe had the good fortune to attend the christening on the nation’s first dual purpose, rapid response vessel and pilot launch. As the first vessel to be designed for offshore salvage and firefighting requirements

  • if we sent abroad a little bit of energy and brought home a few soldiers? I’ll take my chances on lifting the export ban. What about you? - MarPro   Joseph Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com, and is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He can be reached

  • you are not. In the middle of the biggest shipping and maritime revival on these shores in the past 50 years, this is simply no time to find out.   Joseph Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com, and is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He can be reached

  • When the time comes to pull an edition together, sometimes the content simply takes on a life of its own, as is the case with the July 2014 edition and the proliferation of ‘gas’ throughout. While the advent of gas and all that this little word encompasses is hardly breaking news, to put it in context we

  • John R. Walbridge has been reelected chairman of the board of the American Institute of Marine Underwriters ( A I M U ) . Elected along with Mr. Walbridge (senior vice president of The Insurance Company of North America) were: Edward K. Trowbridge, deputy chairman (senior executive vice president

  • important. I myself prefer to stay out of the eye of any storm – real, imagined or metaphorical. And, that’s just what I intend to do. – MarPro Joseph Keefe is the lead commentator of MaritimeProfessional.com. Additionally, he is Editor of both Maritime Professional and MarineNews print magazines. He

  • latest case studies in this evolving technology • Improve your understanding of the challenges ahead and available solutions Roundtable Chairman: Joseph Keefe, Editor, Maritime Professional Panelists: Mahinde Abeynaike, Managing Director, Bomin Linde LNG Aziz Bamik, General Manager, GTT North America Hol

  • I couldn’t possibly kick off this edition of MarineNews without first acknowledging – and applauding – the passage of the long-awaited, much needed Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA). Signed into law by the President on June 10th, the bill gives the domestic waterfront a much improved

  • EBDG’s LNG bunkering barge design receives ABS approvals as the maritime industry increasingly looks to LNG as a fuel of the future. In early June, Federal Maritime Commissioner William P. Doyle told listeners at an LNG Bunkering conference in Vancouver, Canada that “Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) bunkering

  • 100m gt strong, International Registries and the Republic of the Marshall Islands Registry prove that quality and safety are not mutually exclusive. When International Registries, Inc. and its affiliates (IRI) and Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) Registry recently pushed through 100 million gross

  • On June 4 2012, Deputy Maritime Administrator Paul “Chip” Jaenichen was named Acting Maritime Administrator. With the U.S. Maritime Administration since July 2012 when he was appointed Deputy Maritime Administrator by President Obama, Jaenichen would no doubt like to be confirmed as the Administrator; sooner

  • MR Nov-19#76 M
MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE
Crew Care: Managing Mariner)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 76

    M MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE Crew Care: Managing Mariner Medical Care By Joe Keefe he competent authority shall as the population on shore enjoys. But, the embarking any mariner, a trusted 2012. There are several key aspects to require that, prior to begin- that’s not always the case. In case of

  • MR Nov-19#4  Paci? c Green Technologies.
Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    Learning Systems, maker of publications, print and electronic. MarineLMS. Poulter Keefe Scott Poulter is founder & CEO of Paci? c Green Technologies. Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy and editor of MarineNews. Stoichevski William Stoichevski is MR’s correspondent

  • MN Nov-19#98  Directors 
that it has named Joseph Piccione as  Rockwood)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 98

    PSG Names Piccione as CEO Pure Safety Group (PSG) announced experience apiece. Captain Randall Shea serves on the Board of Directors that it has named Joseph Piccione as Rockwood also joined Mid-Atlantic of DCLI and Blume Global and on the chief executive of? cer. Piccione’s start Maritime as an advanced

  • MN Nov-19#30 ; than done. Until now.
By Joseph Keefe
n the fast moving world)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 30

    range of communications and reduced satel- lite costs. Domestic brown water operators know all too well that’s easier said; than done. Until now. By Joseph Keefe n the fast moving world of blue water, deep draft ship- ception, rather than the rule. And then, there’s the evolv- ping, the availability of reliable

  • MN Nov-19#6  our Apps
iPhone & Android
Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    winds are indeed blowing for our autonomous and digital future. That’s something everyone can be happy about. Download our Apps iPhone & Android Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink.com SUBSCRIBE Subscribe to the print or electronic edition of at www.marinelink.com/renewsubscr/Renew04/subscribe.html

  • MN Nov-19#4  BY THE NUMBERS
Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    .com Associate Publisher & Editorial Director 8 Authors & Contributors Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor 10 BY THE NUMBERS Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com US Offshore Support Vessel Tel: 704-661-8475 Analysis: 2018 and 2019 Web Editor By Robert Day Eric Haun • haun@marinelink

  • MN Nov-19#2  satellite costs.  
By Joseph Keefe
REGULATORY REVIEW
60)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    ISO: Affordable & Reliable Workboat Comms Commercial workboats can bene? t from greater range of communications and reduced satellite costs. By Joseph Keefe REGULATORY REVIEW 60 Subchapter M: One Year In Industry SME (Captain) Pat Folan weighs in FeaturesFeatures Credit: Baltic Workboats from the

  • MP Q3-19#44 ,	it	doesn’t	have	to	be.
By Joseph Keefe
he	competent	authority	shall)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 44

    MARINER WELFARE Managing Mariner Medical Care It’s complicated, and it is expensive. But, it doesn’t have to be. By Joseph Keefe he competent authority shall require that, prior to begin- amounted to a total of 760 million euro. Much of that cost, pri- ning w ork on a ship, seafarers hold a valid medical cer-

  • MP Q3-19#8  one, 
without the other.
Joseph Keefe, Editor | keefe@marinelink)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 8

    , on any ocean or coastline, getting green will be Job ONE in the New Year. Hint: there are two kinds of green. You won’t get one, without the other. Joseph Keefe, Editor | keefe@marinelink.com 8 Maritime Logistics Professional September/October 2019 |

  • MP Q3-19#6  have to be.       
By Joseph Keefe
ON THE COVER
September/Octob)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 6

    , goes on. By Tom Ewing 44 M anaging Mariner Medical Care It’s complicated, and it is expensive. But, it doesn’t have to be. By Joseph Keefe ON THE COVER September/October | Volume 9, Issue 5 www.MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com It has been a wild ride for the Baltic Index and Bulk

  • MP Q3-19#4 .com
 
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Joseph Keefe
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    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    212 477 6700 2 New York, NY 10010 USA +1 212 254 6271Fax 3 URL www.MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com Email trauthwein@marinelink.com 4 Editor 5 Joseph Keefe keefe@marinelink.com +1 704 661 8475 6 Contributing Writers 7 William P. Doyle Rick Eyerdam 8 Patricia Keefe Barry Parker 9 William Stoichevski 10 Publis

  • MR Oct-19#4  News. 
Keefe
Bonvento Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regu- sory Board. lar contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News. Keefe Bonvento Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Matthew Bonvento is the newest Assistant Professor in the Maritime Academy and editor of MarineNews

  • MN Sep-19#54  logistics indus- Corp.; and Joseph Pyne, Chairman of  leader)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 54

    of experience working in President and CEO of Alaska Tanker Head of Cyber Security. A recognized the transportation and logistics indus- Corp.; and Joseph Pyne, Chairman of leader with a strong track record of try, most recently serving as the Direc- the Board of the Kirby Corporation. success in cyber

  • MN Sep-19#44  what might come next.
By Joseph Keefe
hen it comes to critical)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 44

    is evolving and it is here to stay. Here to sort it all out are two of industry’s more familiar stakeholders who also explain what might come next. By Joseph Keefe hen it comes to critical offshore operations and trained the crews increased safety, gained ef? ciency and vessel handling, this is not your

  • MN Sep-19#6  our Apps
iPhone & Android
Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    of tomorrow will differ from his or her counterpart of today. And you thought the waterfront was boring? Download our Apps iPhone & Android Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink.com SUBSCRIBE Subscribe to the print or electronic edition of at www.marinelink.com/renewsubscr/Renew04/subscribe.html

  • MN Sep-19#4  & Contributors
Editor
Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    . O’Malley • jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher & Editorial Director Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com 8 Authors & Contributors Editor Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com Tel: 704-661-8475 10 BY THE NUMBERS Web Editor Eric Haun • haun@marinelink.com SubM: A Look Back at Year 1; Looking Ahead

  • MN Sep-19#2  and it is here to stay. 
By Joseph Keefe
COATINGS
Features
Credit:)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    OPERATIONS & TRAINING 44 The ABC’s of DP 101 Dynamic Positioning has been around for a while, it is evolving and it is here to stay. By Joseph Keefe COATINGS Features Credit: SJSB 48 Chasing Better Prospects 32 SHIPBUILDING & REPAIR As the offshore industry recovers, choosing the right

  • MN Oct-19#52  KP ’78 (President and CEO,  ed Joseph F. Toomy to the Board)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 52

    , KP ’79 (Profes- Names New CEO sor, RPI and Le Moyne College), John Gov. John Bel Edwards has reappoint- Noonan, KP ’78 (President and CEO, ed Joseph F. Toomy to the Board of Paci? c Green Technologies has ap- Binnacle Maritime LLC), Brian Starer, Commissioners of the Port of New pointed Scott

  • MN Oct-19#36  And, you’ve got options.
By Joseph Keefe
he Voyage Data Recorder)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 36

    INLAND NAVIGATION & ELECTRONICS VDRs for Inland Vessels? Does It Make Sense? Credit: Radio Holland It just might. And, you’ve got options. By Joseph Keefe he Voyage Data Recorder (VDR) carriage re- On the Market, Available Now quirements apply to all passenger ships regard- Orolia recently announced

  • MN Oct-19#4  BY THE NUMBERS
Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    .com Associate Publisher & Editorial Director 8 Authors & Contributors Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor 10 BY THE NUMBERS Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com Tel: 704-661-8475 U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Recreational Boating Stats Web Editor Eric Haun • haun@marinelink.com 20 OP/ED Contri

  • MN Mar-19#44  10% enforcement. Really.
By Joseph Keefe
he domestic waterfront)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 44

    minimum Random Drug Testing Rate is raised to 50 PCT, the Coast Guard wants its mission to consist of 90% outreach and just 10% enforcement. Really. By Joseph Keefe he domestic waterfront got some less-than-happy Over a third of the American population is on some form news when the U.S. Coast Guard announced

  • MN Mar-19#6  our Apps
iPhone & Android
Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    . Indeed, 2019, when it comes to marine propulsion – especially for workboats – looks to be the year of ‘hybrid.’ Download our Apps iPhone & Android Joseph Keefe, Editor, keefe@marinelink.com SUBSCRIBE Subscribe to the print or electronic edition of at www.marinelink.com/renewsubscr/Renew04/subscribe.html

  • MN Mar-19#4   Authors & Contributors
Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    .com 6 Editor’s Note Associate Publisher & Editorial Director Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor 8 Authors & Contributors Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com Tel: 704-661-8475 Web Editor 10 BY THE NUMBERS Eric Haun • haun@marinelink.com Waterborne Freight Transpor- Contributing

  • MN Mar-19#2  Trans-
merchant feet
By Joseph Keefe
portation Company,)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    inland markets, Chairman Pushboats, Tugs enforcement. Really. & Assist Vessels The heart of the U.S. & CEO of Campbell Trans- merchant feet By Joseph Keefe portation Company, Peter Stephaich, provides a unique HYBRID PROPULSION window into what’s just around the next bend. His 48 Marine Hybrid