New Jersey

  • The battleship New Jersey (BB-62) was recommissioned recently at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, Long Beach, Calif.

    President Ronald Reagan was the commissioning speaker.

    The New Jersey's recommissioning marks the fourth time the ship has become part of the active fleet. Originally commissioned May 23, 1943, it earned nine battle stars in World War II. It was recommissioned November 21, 1950, and earned four more battle stars for action in Korea. The battleship was last recommissioned April 6, 1968, at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for service during the Vietnam conflict. The New Jersey received two more battle stars and one Navy Unit Commendation for Vietnam service.

    The New Jersey's nine 16-inch and twelve 5-inch guns complement its newly added offensive armament of eight armored box launchers for Tomahawk cruise missiles; four quad launchers for Harpoon cruise missiles; and Vulcan-Phalanx close-in-weapons systems for self-defense against aircraft and missiles.

    Other modernization changes to the New Jersey include modern electronic countermeasures systems; a cruiser-style communication system; aviation facilities and operating stations for SH-60B helicopters; updated air and surface search radars; and conversion of the fuel plant to burn Navy distillate fuel. Modernization of the New Jersey began in 1981.

    The New Jersey is 887 feet long and has a beam of 108 feet.

    It has a displacement of 57,355 tons and a draft of 36 feet. The ship has a crew of 67 officers and 1,460 enlisted personnel.

    Capt. William M. Fogarty, a native of Des Moines, Iowa, will command the New Jersey.

    The U.S. Navy plans to modernize and bring four battleships back into service. These include the USS New Jersey, the USS Iowa, the USS Missouri, and the USS Wisconsin. The first modernization, the USS New Jersey, is now completed at a cost of approximately $326-million.

    Modernization of the second ship, the USS Iowa, is being con- ducted by Ingalls Shipbuilding of Pascagoula, Miss., and Avondale Shipyards, New Orleans, La.

    It is estimated the project will take 27 months. The total cost of the Iowa refurbishing project has been put at approximately $400- million. Approximately $200-million of this figure is for shipyard work, the balance will be for new weapons.

    The other two ships, the Missouri and the Wisconsin, remain in the reserve fleet at the present time.

    (See MARITIME REPORTER Engineering News, April 15, 1982, August 15, 1982, November 1, 1982 and November 15, 1982 issues.)

  • Inc. has added another catamaran ferry to its service within the New York City commuter market with the December 10, 2001 launch of M/V Seastreak New Jersey. The 141-ft. (42.9-m), 400 passenger high speed catamaran will provide daily commuter ferry service from Atlantic Highlands and Highlands, N

  • The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and a major marine terminal operator in the Port of Hamburg, Germany, have successfully linked their Electronic Data Exchange (EDI) systems to create an international interchange of oceanborne cargo information. The announcement was made by Lillian C.

  • The 1977 edition of the Port of New York and New Jersey Scheduled Steamship Service Directory is now available for use by exporters, importers, freight forwarders and business and governmental agencies as a primary information source on the ocean shipping services available at America's leading port.

  • ships of the Iowa class were the last battleships built by the United States. In addition to the U.S.S. Iowa (BB-61), the class includes the U.S.S. New Jersey (BB- 62), the U.S.S. Missouri (BB-63), and the U.S.S. Wisconsin (BB-64). The ships were originally commissioned between 1943 and 1944, were in

  • of the 140- ft. (42.6 m) commuter and leisure vessel M/V SeaStreak New York. The 400-passenger vessel will provide service between New York City and New Jersey. SeaStreak New York joins a SeaStreak fleet of two 300-passenger catamarans already providing commuter service between Atlantic Highlands and

  • Iowa-class battleships is viewed as the most cost effective way to provide an early signifi- cant increase in the capability of the U.S. Navy. The New Jersey is expected to return to the fleet in early 1983, much sooner than it would take to build a new warship from the keel up

  • members who are subcontractors or marine equipment suppliers. According to Michael Gallagher, the president of the newly formed New York and New Jersey Dry Dock Association, repair costs have become competitive with Europe and many other areas of the world. Mr. Gallagher noted that New York

  • Alfred C. Bruggemann, outgoing president of the New York and New Jersey Dry Dock Association, has announced the election of Robert L. Massa as president for the new term. Mr. Massa was born and educated on Staten Island, N.Y., and attended Wagner College and Rutgers University. After serving his

  • man he served in the military, joining the Navy in 1967. Flood first served on Laffey, then aboard Wright, and then as quartermaster on the U.S.S. New Jersey. The latter, he admits, was his dream come true. "I felt as though I had been let loose on one of my model ships," he said. Captured on film from

  • a Circle Line vessel, on which presentations of maritime awards and an ecumenical service were held. As some 400 members of New York and New Jersey's maritime community looked on, sponsors from government, labor, and management placed ceremonial wreaths on the waters of the harbor. A bugler

  • Heroes From the Past," and brief, dignified tributes to the merchant marine industry of the present were the highlights of the Port of New York-New Jersey National Maritime Day ceremonies held Monday, May 22, on the plaza of the World Trade Center, New York, N.Y. Some 200 midshipmen from the United

  • MR Oct-19#74    fax:(609) 978-4959, BJDME@marinewinch.com  
mark@mesamarine)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 74

    , Fairhope, Alabama 36532 , tel:(251) 928-1234, Blohm+Voss B.V. & Co. KG, Hermann-Blohm-Strasse 3, www.watercannon.com fax:(609) 978-4959, BJDME@marinewinch.com mark@mesamarine.com 20457 Hamburg, Germany Germany , tel:+49 40 3119 TANK MEASURING SYSTEMS HYDRAWRAP 2110, shipservices@blohmvoss

  • MR Oct-19#70 T
TECH FILES
New Online Marine Insurance Program
360)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    T TECH FILES New Online Marine Insurance Program 360 Coverage Pros poised to modernize the professional liability insurance buying experience for mariners. 360 Coverage Pros launched a new Marine Li- operators, either directly or through their insurance cense Insurance Program for mariners that offers

  • MR Oct-19#68  by 2021
Prompted by a bevy of new interna- form to provide)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    T TECH FILES e5 Lab aims to build Zero-Emission Tanker by 2021 Prompted by a bevy of new interna- form to provide a lineup of services that tenance and management, thereby en- chargeable batteries to provide tional rules aimed at slashing emissions takes advantage of electrically powered suring that

  • MR Oct-19#66  its operations, there is a 
new digital technologies like)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 66

    or conference, and you will no age, maintain and archive all of the data doubt hear someone question whether collected across its operations, there is a new digital technologies like block- signi? cant risk that this information can- chain, big data or the Internet of Things not be stored safely, given

  • MR Oct-19#65  reduce sulfur oxide (SOx) 
the new vessel will be able to)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 65

    for maximizing the cargo tive in 2025. The vessel is additionally loading space will be implemented, and expected to reduce sulfur oxide (SOx) the new vessel will be able to transport emissions by approximately 99% and approximately 7,000 units (standard ve- nitrogen oxides (NOx) by approximately

  • MR Oct-19#64  and also ship-to-
to debut a new 29-ft. autonomous vessel)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    Shark and Sea Machines have partnered 29 De? ant and all onboard systems are commanded vessels that use LNG as a fuel source and also ship-to- to debut a new 29-ft. autonomous vessel which is via a direct wireless PC-based user interface. An in- shore transfers to small scale marine distribution infra- now

  • MR Oct-19#63  veri?  cation 
? elds into the new and emerging areas of data)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    , adoption and uniform implementation of IMO treaties, guidelines, codes and regu- lations. Expanding class society’s veri? cation ? elds into the new and emerging areas of data quality assurance and sensor equipped sys- tems is also an important aspect. Class needs to be involved in the validation

  • MR Oct-19#62  Indian Register of Shipping
New technology has revolutionized)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    (IRClass) Arun Sharma is Execu- tive Chairman of the In- dian Register of Shipping (IRClass) and Chairman of IACS. Courtesy Indian Register of Shipping New technology has revolutionized the demands of shipping in the future. Malta, Cyprus and Bulgaria. to take over the Chairmanship of the In- the shipping

  • MR Oct-19#61 ,” said  with a whole new breed of people we’ve 
Wiernicki)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    society we have en- must change too. “We at ABS are going gineers and surveyors sitting side-by-side through a digital transformation,” said with a whole new breed of people we’ve Wiernicki. “We are progressively moving never recruited before: data scientists, toward the future of class that is evolv-

  • MR Oct-19#60  impact- in the glamor of new technologies, Wi- to Kitack)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    to get caught up I’m about to send a personal letter now safety and risk concerns occupying the – as the “three tectonic shifts” impact- in the glamor of new technologies, Wi- to Kitack Lim at IMO encouraging him attention and budgets of shipowners ing the maritime industry for the coming ernicki said

  • MR Oct-19#59  to ensure safety, researching new 
if produced from renewable)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 59

    carbon free. This is the case oping and updating our rules and stan- for electricity, hydrogen and ammonia, dards to ensure safety, researching new if produced from renewable energy or technologies and ef? ciency measures, fossil energy with carbon capture, for and offering tools and information

  • MR Oct-19#58 , without  quirements for newbuildings intro- shipping)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    strict re- Digitalization can reduce the cost of third path, sees the potential for the rapid tive fuel adoption is increasing, without quirements for newbuildings intro- shipping while contributing to improved introduction of other fuel options with changes in the policy background – we duced abruptly

  • MR Oct-19#57  and deliver the innovative new LNG bunker 
BHG focused)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    to help Beers. The companies are able to share resources, with emission regulations are changing the game … rapidly. design and deliver the innovative new LNG bunker BHG focused on the blue water side of the business; “Companies looking to stay under Tier 4 require- barge built and delivered last year

  • MR Oct-19#53  drawing boards put in storage. New 
design processes had to)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 53

    Singapore shipyards and owners designing unique vessels for the offshore industry in Asia. Then computers arrived and the drawing boards put in storage. New design processes had to be developed to make the best use of the new tools. This was easier for the young designer than for some of the old hands

  • MR Oct-19#52  support of shipbuilding new steel ships  steel was)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    welding changed the design business forever. Initially, of steerable Kort nozzles for tugs and ? shing vessels. of Government support of shipbuilding new steel ships steel was used in the design of vessels for the inland wa- Good ideas, whether developed in BC or imported from built in BC became very

  • MR Oct-19#51   carries an intimidating set of new sys- navigation with an)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    HISTORY DESIGN EVOLUTION many requirements including reduced carries an intimidating set of new sys- navigation with an ever-changing and consideration for existing harbors and tug handling, dynamic positioning, com- tems and interconnections for controls, ever-moving coastline. In an age where high-conc

  • MR Oct-19#50 ?  uenced by three drivers: New three-di- and concept phases)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    tion packages towards earlier efforts in the feasibility booklet of drawings is giving way to the spinning, ren- in? uenced by three drivers: New three-di- and concept phases of vessel design. dered surface. While it is hard to give up the experience mensional design tools, the increasing com-

  • MR Oct-19#47  in the 
wind:  a number of new ‘old’ 
technologies such)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    HISTORY DESIGN EVOLUTION The Future is ‘blowin’ in the wind: a number of new ‘old’ technologies such as wind power are making serious in- roads in maritime design as the industry plots a course toward decarbonization. Credit: Windship are simply the march of technology like ship autonomy. For my

  • MR Oct-19#46  to discuss 
A
Highlands New Jersey. To- have her amazing)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    Twin Lights in The Constitution escaped and went on to entire squadron and really put a hurt on many reasons for this column to discuss A Highlands New Jersey. To- have her amazing victories that year, but the British, and navy steam would have that, but in this 80th anniversary issue of day it is a

  • MR Oct-19#42  mature, and the 
10% per year. New employees have re- designed)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    , our attrition rate remains well under The manner in which ships are Computer Aided Design (CAD) con- various CAD programs mature, and the 10% per year. New employees have re- designed has evolved mightily since tinues to be the most in? uential and ability to model production information ferred to us

  • MR Oct-19#41  needing surge engineering 
new benchmarks along the way)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    market, and USCG. Our role as a shipyard Design Agent and we have exceeded the target each year, needing spans many shipyards needing surge engineering new benchmarks along the way. Our and design services. Internationally, we support success is honestly easy to understand: shipyards in Halifax and

  • MR Oct-19#37  for 
statement is genuine. new hires; they see that you)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    the corner- “Perhaps most importantly, it inspires stone of success, in Faber’s case the our team and inspires the atmosphere for statement is genuine. new hires; they see that you are invest- “We are not managed from the top ing in the company and the future.” down,” is how Faber easily describes his

  • MR Oct-19#33  Maritime Reporter & Engineering News 
Trans-shipment terminals)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 33

    ($2.5 billion question of what’s ahead. The ACP told ports. (on the Paci? c). total in 2018, of which 159 mm out of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News Trans-shipment terminals on both the In 1998, just prior to the handover of total 441 mm Panama Canal Universal that “The Panama Canal, always

  • MR Oct-19#31  to Paci?  c Rim receivers. 
The new locks have had little impact)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 31

    and Chile (#5 with 46 cargos). When smaller off-takers are considered, more than 40% of U.S. LNG export liftings were to Paci? c Rim receivers. The new locks have had little impact on conventional dry bulk and tanker trades. On the dry side, larger Capesize vessels, laden with Brazilian ore, are