Rhode

  • (The Rhode Island Subsea Sector is profiled in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technology Reporter. Rhode Island Governor Lincoln D. Chafee offers insights on the wealth of opportunity found in his state).

     

    As the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, Rhode Island was at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurial creativity, and economic transformation, beginning with the Slater Mill in 1793.  Just as Rhode Island led our nation through the introduction of new manufacturing processes two hundred years ago, we continue to break new ground and promote economic growth through our maritime and defense industries, cutting-edge research institutions, and the Ocean State’s position as the country’s current leader for offshore wind energy.
    Only in Rhode Island can you find such a diverse range of defense and maritime-related expertise concentrated in such a small geographic footprint.  Our defense sector supports multiple Department of Defense and Homeland Security needs with a highly connected network of companies - from multinational corporations to start-ups that are moving out of the lab and into the marketplace.  Rhode Island excels in manufacturing and developing technology for everything from sophisticated nuclear submarines to wooden skiffs.
    From the establishment of the Newport Torpedo Station on Goat Island in 1869 to the emergence of today’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island has a long and proud history of leading the U.S. Navy’s undersea warfare research and system development efforts.  Rhode Island’s excellence in undersea warfare has fostered partnerships between the defense and private industries that have created thousands of quality jobs and support a strong supply chain of growing businesses in the state.  
    Rhode Island has also made critical infrastructure investments in our ports, including the Port of Davisville at the Quonset Business Park - home to well-known firms like General Dynamics Electric Boat – and the Port of Providence.  By taking steps to modernize our ports, one of our leading economic assets, we have expanded the capacity of Rhode Island to continue to be a premier hub for maritime activity for decades to come.   
    Rhode Island’s 400 miles of coastline has helped the state to become the center of world-class oceanographic research.  As a leading institute of ocean education and research, the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography is playing a key role in the development of ocean science, spanning the core disciplines of marine geology and geophysics, biology, atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and physics.
    In 1966, URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering was the first in the nation to establish Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Ocean Engineering.  The program conducts research and trains a world-renowned workforce in ocean robotics, underwater acoustics, tsunamis, coastal circulation, marine geomechanics, ocean structures, and offshore energy generation.  Graduates are employed by major corporations, small companies, and consulting firms, as well as major government research laboratories.
    Rhode Island led our country in a major economic transformation at the end of the 18th century, and the state is positioned to do so once again by paving the way in exploring the sound and effective development of offshore wind energy.  Through a partnership with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Rhode Island has provided critical scientific and technical information to identify the optimal areas for offshore renewable energy development. 
    A critical part of this process has been Rhode Island’s investment of more than $10 million in the creation of an Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for promoting balanced uses of our oceans.  Rhode Island is the only state that has adopted a SAMP in federal waters with a specific focus on the development of offshore renewable energy resources.  At the same time the Ocean SAMP was adopted, Rhode Island held a competitive process to choose a preferred developer for an offshore wind farm.  The developer has already made significant investments to establish a wind farm in state waters off Block Island, which could well be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.
    Utilizing the natural capital found throughout our state, Rhode Island will continue to lead as a regional and national center of excellence for renewable energy.
    Just as they have throughout Rhode Island’s history, our defense and maritime industries, educational and research institutions, technological advances, and coastal infrastructure are key economic advantages.  Rhode Island is open for business and continues to lead the way in the 21st century.   

    Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor, Rhode Island
     

    (As published in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com)

  • Rhode Island may be the smallest state in the union, but its vision of the future is as far reaching as the ocean lapping at its shores. Taking a page from the University of Rhode Island (URI) motto, “Think Big, We do!,” the Rhode Island Economic Development Corp. (RIEDC) is working hard to position the

  • One of the jewels in Rhode Island’s marine crown is the Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP), a ground-breaking, standard-setting and nationally lauded approach to ocean management with a focus on renewable energy. Faced with increasing pressure on ocean resources from offshore energy

  • It’s powerful, it’s clean, and it’s something the Ocean State has plenty of: energy-rich offshore winds.  Rhode Island, along with its designated developer, Deepwater Wind, hopes to be the first in the U.S. to harness that blow, starting with an initial, five-turbine, 30-MW demonstration project off Block

  • shelf region will be the focus for the ninth annual Center for Ocean Management Studies conference to be held June 16-19 at the University of Rhode Island. The conference will begin with an overview addressing the natural resources of the shelf, the changes in the concept and legal definitions

  • for ship propulsion. The report, "Resistance Reduction in Merchant Ships by the New Propulsion System," was prepared for MarAd by the University of Rhode Island. The New Propulsion System — the name of the concept — uses a hydraulic transmission outside the ship's hull. An axial-flow pump driven

  • , 2016, we watched as the fifth tower and associated nacelle was raised on the Deepwater Offshore Wind Farm approximately 3 miles offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island. This is the first Offshore Wind farm erected in the United States and, without a doubt, a huge step forward for this controversial project

  • Rhode Island may be the “red” state in terms of the state color, flower and tree, but it bleeds blue – Navy blue.  That’s because the U.S. Navy is deeply anchored into the fabric of the Ocean State’s history and economy. Its roots stretch all the way back to the birth of an armed naval force in 1775, and to

  • , was commissioned on November 18 at Davisville, R.I. in special ceremonies. This 5,750- horsepower vessel is one of five sister ships now based in Rhode Island. A crowd of spectators, representing Rhode Island's leading citizens and the oil industry, watched as the vessel's sponsor Mrs. Paul L

  • Warren, Rhode Island-based shipbuilder Blount Marine Corporation recently launched and christened the latest addition to the growing Cruise International fleet, the dinner/excursion boat M/V Spirit of Boston. The Spirit was the first boat launched from Blount Marine's new shipway. Being constructed

  • waters in over fifty years. The Bridget 30 tugboat is one of several steam and diesel tugboats, ranging in length from 22 to 45 feet, built by the Rhode Island firm. She is powered by an oil-fired steam boiler made by Hobby Steam Boilers, Limited, of Slocum, R.I., driving a Semple Model 354 compound ste

  • boats have to go farther and get out and back faster then in times past. The Lady Frances is designed for that kind of service," says Jay Gallup of Rhode Island Engine, a Lugger dealer in Narragansett, R.I. For free literature about Alaska Diesel Electric's Lugger 6140AL diesel engine, Circle 25

  • MN Nov-19#72  Boats facility 
in Warren, Rhode Island. While the year)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 72

    BOATS: Credit: Greg Trauthwein Ferries, Offshore Wind Vessels Dominate Present, Future MarineNews recently visited the Blount Boats facility in Warren, Rhode Island. While the year 2019 might be the ‘year of the woman’ in the eyes of the International Maritime Organization, the two women at the head of

  • MR Oct-19#55  own boss. I think  of?  ce. “Rhode Island was a hub at the)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    yacht design of? ces within 20 miles of BHG’s current Star of Saugatuck Boat Cruises. about how cool it would be to be your own boss. I think of? ce. “Rhode Island was a hub at the time,” Wood re- The company set up permanent shop in Rhode Is- our ? rst idea was designing luxury submarines,” said members

  • MN Sep-19#50  passenger ferry for 
Rhode Island Fast Ferry, Inc)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 50

    Delivery of Second Gladding-Hearn High-Speed Ferry Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation, has delivered a second high-speed passenger ferry for Rhode Island Fast Ferry, Inc., for service between Quon- set Point, Rhode Island and Martha’s Vineyard. The vessel features the designer’s “S” bow hulls

  • MN Sep-19#41 . Except for Block Island in Rhode Island, all the work on)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 41

    projects ready to bust through intermi- Ocean WEAs OCS-A 512 and OCS-A 487, respectively. nable studies and studies of studies. Except for Block Island in Rhode Island, all the work on Indeed, there is a lot of offshore wind energy in the US offshore wind is still preliminary, really just a library. developmental

  • MN Sep-19#20   provide electricity in Rhode Island, Massachusetts)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 20

    – the Atlantic seaboard, with projects totaling 3,110 MW of capacity are contracted to strong winds, a shallow continental provide electricity in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Con- shelf and a proximity to dense popula- necticut, New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Virginia. tion centers is driving

  • MP Q3-19#40  
Except for Block Island in Rhode Island, all the work on)
    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 40

    and Operations Plan. OCS-A 512 and OCS-A 487, respectively. ting requirements, awaiting ? nal okay from the Ohio Power Except for Block Island in Rhode Island, all the work on US Siting Board. Construction is slated for 2022. offshore wind is still preliminary, really just a library. Actually, The

  • MR Aug-19#70   high-speed catamaran ferry to Rhode Island Fast Ferry. This)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    include the delivery of a 113/320-ft. passenger boats, OSVs, polar icebreakers, self-unloading carriers and more. FBS has high-speed catamaran ferry to Rhode Island Fast Ferry. This is the second pas- also completed 14 engine repowerings which are more energy and emission senger catamaran built for the

  • MR Aug-19#48  shipyard in Warren, Rhode  Great South Bay.
When)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    Power the Future Photos: Courtesy Blount Boats Founded in 1949, Blount Boats is a between Bay Shore and Fire Island on full-service shipyard in Warren, Rhode Great South Bay. When eying future opportunities, they are best described Island, with a customer base comprised Blount is currently working on

  • MR Aug-19#47  and the Uni-
versity of Rhode Island.
Paul has been)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    is the oldest son of Robert E. Derecktor, founder of Derecktor Ship- yards. He studied engineering at New York Maritime College and the Uni- versity of Rhode Island. Paul has been apprenticed in ev- ery trade involved in the construc- tion and repair of wood, aluminum, steel and ? berglass vessels. He

  • MR Aug-19#25 .COM
engine. 
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND
www.marinelink)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    hydrogen onboard, as fast, next- generation hybrid vessels emerge with hydrogen fuel cells and/or a hydrogen BLOUNTBOATS.COM engine. WARREN, RHODE ISLAND www.marinelink.com 25 MR #8 (18-25).indd 25 8/1/2019 11:25:43 A

  • MN Aug-19#42  high-speed catamaran ferry to Rhode 
loyal customers. The)
    August 2019 - Marine News page: 42

    . Today, FURUNO is a total marine electronics manufacturer operating on a global scale with a great many 113’/320 passenger high-speed catamaran ferry to Rhode loyal customers. The product line consists of Radars, Fish Island Fast Ferry. This is the second passenger catamaran built for the operator. 2018

  • MN Aug-19#23  on the harbor in Bristol, Rhode Island. BHGI has 
been)
    August 2019 - Marine News page: 23

    Harbor Group, Inc. (BHGI) is a full service na- val architecture, marine engineering and consulting ? rm located on the harbor in Bristol, Rhode Island. BHGI has been in business for more than 25 years and have produced numerous designs, to which hundreds of vessels have been built. BHGI

  • MR Jul-19#60  a shipyard located in Warren, Rhode Is- 94520
Category: Corporate)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    The Company Job Location: Willow Pass Road Concord, California, Full Time , General / Operations Manager Blount Boats is a shipyard located in Warren, Rhode Is- 94520 Category: Corporate / Senior Management land. The shipyard specializes in the design and construc- Contact Job Location: Pier 9 East End

  • MP Q2-19#16  failure, among them 
ment in Rhode Island. Marad, in a prepared)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    ?c, the service was from Marad was earmarked for the purchase of dockside equip- shut down. Various reasons were cited for its failure, among them ment in Rhode Island. Marad, in a prepared statement, said, “The the failure to cement a tie-up with a major ocean carrier. In the barge service will include a

  • MR Jun-19#19  Advanced Structures and Com- Rhode Island, starts up, the)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    of • 2016 – Block Island Wind Farm in Energy Policy Act, authorizing a produc- Finally, Norton emphasized the im- Maine’s Advanced Structures and Com- Rhode Island, starts up, the ? rst com- tion tax credit of 1.5 cents per kilowatt portance of DOE’s economic analyses posites Center. Dagher explained

  • MR Jun-19#17  Act & OSW Wind project in Rhode Island, the ?  rst  aboard)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 17

    I INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY ment grants. This is especially true in the The Jones Act & OSW Wind project in Rhode Island, the ? rst aboard OSW support vessels. (This will cases of Maryland and Massachusetts. For the most part, we have found the commercial offshore wind farm in the be addressed in

  • MR Jun-19#16 , BOEM and the National  to Rhode Island, $3.5M of which)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    and Eversource committed $4.5M of the turbines not being seen by local states acting through their governors and For example, BOEM and the National to Rhode Island, $3.5M of which will be beachgoers. state legislatures are setting very high Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) have used for higher education

  • MR Apr-19#19 . 
led by the University of Rhode Island 
(URI)’s Graduate)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    . The multi-year deployment, the U.S. National Academies of Scienc- with companies involved in the 2010 operations in the Gulf. led by the University of Rhode Island (URI)’s Graduate School of Oceanogra- phy, will monitor the Loop Current Sys- tem (LCS) using Sonardyne’s Pressure Inverted Echo Sounders

  • MN Apr-19#28  farm,  ropean vessel designs. 
Rhode Island’s ?  ve-turbine)
    April 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    development stage. Denmark and adapted it to Jones Act construction of Eu- The United States has one little offshore wind farm, ropean vessel designs. Rhode Island’s ? ve-turbine, 30-megawatt Block Island project. But the developer, Deepwater Wind, shipped the NASCENT STIRRING IN THE COLONIES ? ? ve

  • MT Mar-19#13  and remote employees in Rhode Island and San 
joined)
    March 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 13

    . We also have a separate nearby Research & Develop- ment and exploration to which I became addicted. In 2006, I ment facility and remote employees in Rhode Island and San joined VideoRay full-time and we quickly worked to establish Diego. the company as the industry leader. Making Hydrographers’ Tasks

  • MN Jan-19#51  led by the 
University of Rhode Island. Earlier, NSF awarded)
    January 2019 - Marine News page: 51

    and testing. NSF has contracted with OSU to build a second similar research vessel, which will be operated by a consortium led by the University of Rhode Island. Earlier, NSF awarded OSU a grant of $121.88 million to launch the construction of the Construction of a new Oregon State University-bound

  • MN Dec-18#16  Maryland, Massachusetts and Rhode 
 
Island projects will)
    December 2018 - Marine News page: 16

    Would you agree with that? at scale. And if we look at the east coast and the US, the Yes. Absolutely. target pricing for the Maryland, Massachusetts and Rhode Island projects will be about half of what Block Island was. Where do you intend to get your blades and build the And so they’re not going to

  • MN Nov-18#86 , will be crucial advantages.
Rhode Island-based shipyard)
    November 2018 - Marine News page: 86

    , and the ability to respond to unique development approaches with enhanced logistical support First Out of the Gate capacity, will be crucial advantages. Rhode Island-based shipyard Blount Boats, in June, an- Page brings an impressive CV to the offshore wind party. nounced that it had signed a sublicense

  • MP Q3-18#44  service from New Jersey to Rhode Island. frastructure,)
    Sep/Oct 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 44

    could eventually require 12 de- port and internalize a “portion of the cost of expanding related in- livery boats providing service from New Jersey to Rhode Island. frastructure, such that growth in demand for moving goods deliv- ers proportional funding for related infrastructure improvement.” On the Radar With