Rhode Island

  • (The Rhode Island Subsea Sector is profiled in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technology Reporter. Rhode Island Governor Lincoln D. Chafee offers insights on the wealth of opportunity found in his state).

     

    As the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, Rhode Island was at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurial creativity, and economic transformation, beginning with the Slater Mill in 1793.  Just as Rhode Island led our nation through the introduction of new manufacturing processes two hundred years ago, we continue to break new ground and promote economic growth through our maritime and defense industries, cutting-edge research institutions, and the Ocean State’s position as the country’s current leader for offshore wind energy.
    Only in Rhode Island can you find such a diverse range of defense and maritime-related expertise concentrated in such a small geographic footprint.  Our defense sector supports multiple Department of Defense and Homeland Security needs with a highly connected network of companies - from multinational corporations to start-ups that are moving out of the lab and into the marketplace.  Rhode Island excels in manufacturing and developing technology for everything from sophisticated nuclear submarines to wooden skiffs.
    From the establishment of the Newport Torpedo Station on Goat Island in 1869 to the emergence of today’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island has a long and proud history of leading the U.S. Navy’s undersea warfare research and system development efforts.  Rhode Island’s excellence in undersea warfare has fostered partnerships between the defense and private industries that have created thousands of quality jobs and support a strong supply chain of growing businesses in the state.  
    Rhode Island has also made critical infrastructure investments in our ports, including the Port of Davisville at the Quonset Business Park - home to well-known firms like General Dynamics Electric Boat – and the Port of Providence.  By taking steps to modernize our ports, one of our leading economic assets, we have expanded the capacity of Rhode Island to continue to be a premier hub for maritime activity for decades to come.   
    Rhode Island’s 400 miles of coastline has helped the state to become the center of world-class oceanographic research.  As a leading institute of ocean education and research, the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography is playing a key role in the development of ocean science, spanning the core disciplines of marine geology and geophysics, biology, atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and physics.
    In 1966, URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering was the first in the nation to establish Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Ocean Engineering.  The program conducts research and trains a world-renowned workforce in ocean robotics, underwater acoustics, tsunamis, coastal circulation, marine geomechanics, ocean structures, and offshore energy generation.  Graduates are employed by major corporations, small companies, and consulting firms, as well as major government research laboratories.
    Rhode Island led our country in a major economic transformation at the end of the 18th century, and the state is positioned to do so once again by paving the way in exploring the sound and effective development of offshore wind energy.  Through a partnership with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Rhode Island has provided critical scientific and technical information to identify the optimal areas for offshore renewable energy development. 
    A critical part of this process has been Rhode Island’s investment of more than $10 million in the creation of an Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for promoting balanced uses of our oceans.  Rhode Island is the only state that has adopted a SAMP in federal waters with a specific focus on the development of offshore renewable energy resources.  At the same time the Ocean SAMP was adopted, Rhode Island held a competitive process to choose a preferred developer for an offshore wind farm.  The developer has already made significant investments to establish a wind farm in state waters off Block Island, which could well be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.
    Utilizing the natural capital found throughout our state, Rhode Island will continue to lead as a regional and national center of excellence for renewable energy.
    Just as they have throughout Rhode Island’s history, our defense and maritime industries, educational and research institutions, technological advances, and coastal infrastructure are key economic advantages.  Rhode Island is open for business and continues to lead the way in the 21st century.   

    Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor, Rhode Island
     

    (As published in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com)

  • Rhode Island may be the smallest state in the union, but its vision of the future is as far reaching as the ocean lapping at its shores. Taking a page from the University of Rhode Island (URI) motto, “Think Big, We do!,” the Rhode Island Economic Development Corp. (RIEDC) is working hard to position the

  • One of the jewels in Rhode Island’s marine crown is the Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP), a ground-breaking, standard-setting and nationally lauded approach to ocean management with a focus on renewable energy. Faced with increasing pressure on ocean resources from offshore energy

  • It’s powerful, it’s clean, and it’s something the Ocean State has plenty of: energy-rich offshore winds.  Rhode Island, along with its designated developer, Deepwater Wind, hopes to be the first in the U.S. to harness that blow, starting with an initial, five-turbine, 30-MW demonstration project off Block

  • , we watched as the fifth tower and associated nacelle was raised on the Deepwater Offshore Wind Farm approximately 3 miles offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island. This is the first Offshore Wind farm erected in the United States and, without a doubt, a huge step forward for this controversial project and

  • shelf region will be the focus for the ninth annual Center for Ocean Management Studies conference to be held June 16-19 at the University of Rhode Island. The conference will begin with an overview addressing the natural resources of the shelf, the changes in the concept and legal definitions of the

  • for ship propulsion. The report, "Resistance Reduction in Merchant Ships by the New Propulsion System," was prepared for MarAd by the University of Rhode Island. The New Propulsion System — the name of the concept — uses a hydraulic transmission outside the ship's hull. An axial-flow pump driven directly

  • Division encompassing eastern and central New York, eastern Pennsylvania and Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Vermont, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Maine, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. Dennis Derby is regional marketing manager in the Northeast, with Phil Janvrin and Don

  • .I. in special ceremonies. This 5,750- horsepower vessel is one of five sister ships now based in Rhode Island. A crowd of spectators, representing Rhode Island's leading citizens and the oil industry, watched as the vessel's sponsor Mrs. Paul L. Kelly smashed the traditional champagne bottle on the

  • Rhode Island may be the “red” state in terms of the state color, flower and tree, but it bleeds blue – Navy blue.  That’s because the U.S. Navy is deeply anchored into the fabric of the Ocean State’s history and economy. Its roots stretch all the way back to the birth of an armed naval force in 1775, and to

  • Warren, Rhode Island-based shipbuilder Blount Marine Corporation recently launched and christened the latest addition to the growing Cruise International fleet, the dinner/excursion boat M/V Spirit of Boston. The Spirit was the first boat launched from Blount Marine's new shipway. Being constructed

  • waters in over fifty years. The Bridget 30 tugboat is one of several steam and diesel tugboats, ranging in length from 22 to 45 feet, built by the Rhode Island firm. She is powered by an oil-fired steam boiler made by Hobby Steam Boilers, Limited, of Slocum, R.I., driving a Semple Model 354 compound steam

  • MR Jan-20#50 In the Yard
New Ship & Boat designs, contracts & deliveries)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    In the Yard New Ship & Boat designs, contracts & deliveries New Contracts ESG Launches NYCDOT Ferry Late last year Eastern Shipbuilding Afghanistan Star from Poland for his valor. Group, Inc. (ESG) launched the SSG He was 24. The three 4500 passenger fer- Michael H. Ollis (Hull 219) the ? rst of ries

  • MR Jan-20#43 Aussie Atlas Shipyard Ready Pressure Cleaners 
Australian)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    Aussie Atlas Shipyard Ready Pressure Cleaners Australian Pump Industries new Aussie Atlas pressure cleaner is the latest addition to its stainless steel line-up of machines designed for shipyard application. The ? rst order will ? nd the units on permanent hire at Garden Island Dockyard in Sydney Harbor

  • MR Jan-20#34 ; Luther Blount, from the Rhode Island- price into the range)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    nuanced and the experts don’t always agree. ticularly as some of the higher ticketed items push the retro? t Consider CTVs; Luther Blount, from the Rhode Island- price into the range of a ? t-for-purpose newbuild. The timing based Blount Boats (which built a crew vessel for Block Is- of construction and

  • MR Jan-20#33 REPAIR & CONVERSION
 “As owners we always 
look for)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 33

    REPAIR & CONVERSION “As owners we always look for opportunities to increase the attractiveness of our vessels. In this context, modern PSVs can be converted and utilized for new operations at a competitive cost compared to new buildings.” Tommy Walaunet, Managing Director, Island Offshore Though

  • MR Jan-20#31 REPAIR & CONVERSION
ploying its foils several times a day)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 31

    REPAIR & CONVERSION ploying its foils several times a day in rough, open seas. After steel construction. its Wavefoil retro? t, it continues to ply a 45-minute crossing Paulsen says vessel owners are well-versed on performance as workhorse for the tiny island nation. “The captain had stars trade-offs.

  • MR Jan-20#24 Legal Beat
Marine Casualties
Anatomy of the Investigation
la)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    Legal Beat Marine Casualties Anatomy of the Investigation lank Rome’s maritime attorneys have rep- damage. resented clients in some of the largest mari- Our experience investigating and providing legal represen- time casualties in the last 20 years, includ- tation for clients because of these casualties

  • MN Jan-20#49 VESSELS
Armstrong to Build Hat Island Ferry
rior vessel)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 49

    VESSELS Armstrong to Build Hat Island Ferry rior vessel control from the raised pilothouse or second station forward. Two bow thrusters and aluminum push knees with rubber fendering ease repeated mooring. Two passenger gates at the bow plus a side door aft expe- dite the boarding process. Additional

  • MN Jan-20#32 SAFETY 
nation as to whether the de?  ciency is a “one)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 32

    SAFETY nation as to whether the de? ciency is a “one off” (likely • Manning speci? c to reductions in engineering speci? c to the vessel and its crew), or whether it’s systemic, staff for automation pointing to a failure in company management. Lindholm, from EDT Forensic Engineering, provided As

  • MN Jan-20#27 He said that limit made sense in the mid-19th century)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 27

    He said that limit made sense in the mid-19th century when control of a ship was more art than science. Without such protections America’s ? edgling oceanic commerce would have withered. Now, Sterbcow asserts, “encouragement of investment in shipbuilding should no longer be accomplished on the backs

  • MN Jan-20#26 PASSENGER VESSELS 
successfully promoted safety. It is)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 26

    PASSENGER VESSELS successfully promoted safety. It is imperative that the Coast comply with a lower safety standard,” according to Smith. Guard safety function be preserved” (emphasis added). As readers likely know, after 43 years, these CBP rulings Bottom line for Stephens and PVA: Congress should not

  • MN Jan-20#16 COLUMN INSURANCE
Fishing for Trouble
Radar Confusion &)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 16

    COLUMN INSURANCE Fishing for Trouble Radar Confusion & Speed Cited in Ferry Grounding By Randy O’Neill While the perennial issue of com- C R TONFUSING ADAR ARGETS mercial vessel and recreational boat col- Such was the case in late fall with dozens of passengers lisions, near misses and allisions with

  • MP Q4-19#48 INSIGHTS
Container Volume Data
By John D. McCown
The China)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    INSIGHTS Container Volume Data By John D. McCown The China Effect he monthly volume data on container movements includes a wealth of information at both the macro and micro level. Recently the monthly container volume data in the U.S. has T When aggregated, it has historically provided a timely and been

  • MP Q4-19#22 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW
plan. The EPA focuses on ships’)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 22

    ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW plan. The EPA focuses on ships’ Engine International Air Pollu- that their crews and managers have suffcient training and record- tion Prevention certifcate, bunker delivery notes, fuel samples, keeping systems to maintain compliance with IMO 2020 rules, and other requirements.

  • MP Q4-19#20 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW
Anticipating Enforcement of Sulfur)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 20

    ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW Anticipating Enforcement of Sulfur Emissions Rules under IMO 2020 By Justin Savage, Peter Whitfeld, and Marshall Morales he new limits adopted under the International Convention documenting unavailability. That report must be fled for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL)

  • MN Dec-19#55  through the University of 
Rhode Island’s (URI) Fascitelli)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 55

    direc- tor of the Virginia Port Authority. NUWC to collaborate with URI’s Advanced Engineering Center A quick tour through the University of Rhode Island’s (URI) Fascitelli Center for Advanced Engineering makes it clear how the new Kingston campus 190,000-square-foot, $150-million facility is

  • MN Dec-19#43  high-speed passenger ferry for Rhode  ington based Tidewater)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 43

    , Island Tug was acquired by Vancouver Wash- Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation, has delivered a second high-speed passenger ferry for Rhode ington based Tidewater Transportation and Terminals. The ATB connection pins are Art couple model FRC 35S Island Fast Ferry, Inc., for service between

  • MN Dec-19#41 GREAT WORKBOATS
sustainable farm-to-market systems that is)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 41

    GREAT WORKBOATS sustainable farm-to-market systems that is in operation to- HYBRID ELECTRIC: day – all-important issues when trading in the gentri? ed ar- DERECKTOR LAUNCHES THIRD eas the vessel will trade. Harbor Harvest is working towards HYBRID CATAMARAN expending the ? eet with a second vessel with

  • MN Dec-19#39 SPECIAL REPORT
happening. Icebreaker Wind is a six turbine)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 39

    SPECIAL REPORT happening. Icebreaker Wind is a six turbine, 20.7-megawatt Association (OMSA), the mouthpiece of the domestic off- offshore demonstration project in Lake Erie. Once approved, shore marine transportation service industry, responded to it will be the ? rst freshwater project in North America.

  • MR Dec-19#32 GREAT SHIPS OF 2019
Ærø-Windmills electri?  ed E-Ferry)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    GREAT SHIPS OF 2019 Ærø-Windmills electri? ed E-Ferry Ellen “An electric ferry costs more up front, The vessel operates in Denmark on the battery-powered car ferries. parts – and for possible scaling to other but is cheaper to operate in the long run, route between Soby (Ærø) and Fynshav • Record-high

  • MT Nov-19#22 2020 & Beyond: Subsea Mining
eas. Many, if not most of)
    November 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 22

    2020 & Beyond: Subsea Mining eas. Many, if not most of these poten- and some rare-earth minerals (REM). ing, the legal and environmental chal- tial ? elds are located in the Paci? c Ring Each of these types of deposits present lenges presented to any mining opera- of Fire and are found within a Coastal

  • MT Nov-19#19 oastal ?  ooding disasters  navigation gates hold the)
    November 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 19

    oastal ? ooding disasters navigation gates hold the largest engi- CONTROL have occurred periodically neering challenge, balancing demands through history often fol- for the widest possible gate opening, Clowed by construction of against cost and engineering to develop ? ood defenses to help ensure

  • MR Nov-19#63 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
for installation)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry.

  • MR Nov-19#24 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
“The US needs to)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND “The US needs to develop a work- force from scratch,” noting that a mas- sive campaign was undertaken in the UK, something that needs to start now in the United States. Laura Smith, USA Director for Atlas Professionals from renewable energy? NJ wants to de- to the

  • MR Nov-19#22 T
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND
Public Of?  cials Face)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 22

    T THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: OFFSHORE WIND Public Of? cials Face Detailed Decisions – needed sooner, not later… AOT is working to develop a new port, speci? cally con? gured to serve Atlantic Ocean wind projects, on 30 acres along the Arthur Kill tidal strait between Staten Island and New Jersey. Boone Davis