Rhode Island

  • (The Rhode Island Subsea Sector is profiled in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technology Reporter. Rhode Island Governor Lincoln D. Chafee offers insights on the wealth of opportunity found in his state).

     

    As the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, Rhode Island was at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurial creativity, and economic transformation, beginning with the Slater Mill in 1793.  Just as Rhode Island led our nation through the introduction of new manufacturing processes two hundred years ago, we continue to break new ground and promote economic growth through our maritime and defense industries, cutting-edge research institutions, and the Ocean State’s position as the country’s current leader for offshore wind energy.
    Only in Rhode Island can you find such a diverse range of defense and maritime-related expertise concentrated in such a small geographic footprint.  Our defense sector supports multiple Department of Defense and Homeland Security needs with a highly connected network of companies - from multinational corporations to start-ups that are moving out of the lab and into the marketplace.  Rhode Island excels in manufacturing and developing technology for everything from sophisticated nuclear submarines to wooden skiffs.
    From the establishment of the Newport Torpedo Station on Goat Island in 1869 to the emergence of today’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island has a long and proud history of leading the U.S. Navy’s undersea warfare research and system development efforts.  Rhode Island’s excellence in undersea warfare has fostered partnerships between the defense and private industries that have created thousands of quality jobs and support a strong supply chain of growing businesses in the state.  
    Rhode Island has also made critical infrastructure investments in our ports, including the Port of Davisville at the Quonset Business Park - home to well-known firms like General Dynamics Electric Boat – and the Port of Providence.  By taking steps to modernize our ports, one of our leading economic assets, we have expanded the capacity of Rhode Island to continue to be a premier hub for maritime activity for decades to come.   
    Rhode Island’s 400 miles of coastline has helped the state to become the center of world-class oceanographic research.  As a leading institute of ocean education and research, the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography is playing a key role in the development of ocean science, spanning the core disciplines of marine geology and geophysics, biology, atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and physics.
    In 1966, URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering was the first in the nation to establish Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Ocean Engineering.  The program conducts research and trains a world-renowned workforce in ocean robotics, underwater acoustics, tsunamis, coastal circulation, marine geomechanics, ocean structures, and offshore energy generation.  Graduates are employed by major corporations, small companies, and consulting firms, as well as major government research laboratories.
    Rhode Island led our country in a major economic transformation at the end of the 18th century, and the state is positioned to do so once again by paving the way in exploring the sound and effective development of offshore wind energy.  Through a partnership with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Rhode Island has provided critical scientific and technical information to identify the optimal areas for offshore renewable energy development. 
    A critical part of this process has been Rhode Island’s investment of more than $10 million in the creation of an Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for promoting balanced uses of our oceans.  Rhode Island is the only state that has adopted a SAMP in federal waters with a specific focus on the development of offshore renewable energy resources.  At the same time the Ocean SAMP was adopted, Rhode Island held a competitive process to choose a preferred developer for an offshore wind farm.  The developer has already made significant investments to establish a wind farm in state waters off Block Island, which could well be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.
    Utilizing the natural capital found throughout our state, Rhode Island will continue to lead as a regional and national center of excellence for renewable energy.
    Just as they have throughout Rhode Island’s history, our defense and maritime industries, educational and research institutions, technological advances, and coastal infrastructure are key economic advantages.  Rhode Island is open for business and continues to lead the way in the 21st century.   

    Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor, Rhode Island
     

    (As published in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com)

  • Rhode Island may be the smallest state in the union, but its vision of the future is as far reaching as the ocean lapping at its shores. Taking a page from the University of Rhode Island (URI) motto, “Think Big, We do!,” the Rhode Island Economic Development Corp. (RIEDC) is working hard to position the

  • One of the jewels in Rhode Island’s marine crown is the Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP), a ground-breaking, standard-setting and nationally lauded approach to ocean management with a focus on renewable energy. Faced with increasing pressure on ocean resources from offshore energy

  • It’s powerful, it’s clean, and it’s something the Ocean State has plenty of: energy-rich offshore winds.  Rhode Island, along with its designated developer, Deepwater Wind, hopes to be the first in the U.S. to harness that blow, starting with an initial, five-turbine, 30-MW demonstration project off Block

  • , we watched as the fifth tower and associated nacelle was raised on the Deepwater Offshore Wind Farm approximately 3 miles offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island. This is the first Offshore Wind farm erected in the United States and, without a doubt, a huge step forward for this controversial project and

  • shelf region will be the focus for the ninth annual Center for Ocean Management Studies conference to be held June 16-19 at the University of Rhode Island. The conference will begin with an overview addressing the natural resources of the shelf, the changes in the concept and legal definitions of the

  • for ship propulsion. The report, "Resistance Reduction in Merchant Ships by the New Propulsion System," was prepared for MarAd by the University of Rhode Island. The New Propulsion System — the name of the concept — uses a hydraulic transmission outside the ship's hull. An axial-flow pump driven directly

  • Division encompassing eastern and central New York, eastern Pennsylvania and Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Vermont, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Maine, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. Dennis Derby is regional marketing manager in the Northeast, with Phil Janvrin and Don

  • .I. in special ceremonies. This 5,750- horsepower vessel is one of five sister ships now based in Rhode Island. A crowd of spectators, representing Rhode Island's leading citizens and the oil industry, watched as the vessel's sponsor Mrs. Paul L. Kelly smashed the traditional champagne bottle on the

  • Rhode Island may be the “red” state in terms of the state color, flower and tree, but it bleeds blue – Navy blue.  That’s because the U.S. Navy is deeply anchored into the fabric of the Ocean State’s history and economy. Its roots stretch all the way back to the birth of an armed naval force in 1775, and to

  • Warren, Rhode Island-based shipbuilder Blount Marine Corporation recently launched and christened the latest addition to the growing Cruise International fleet, the dinner/excursion boat M/V Spirit of Boston. The Spirit was the first boat launched from Blount Marine's new shipway. Being constructed

  • waters in over fifty years. The Bridget 30 tugboat is one of several steam and diesel tugboats, ranging in length from 22 to 45 feet, built by the Rhode Island firm. She is powered by an oil-fired steam boiler made by Hobby Steam Boilers, Limited, of Slocum, R.I., driving a Semple Model 354 compound steam

  • MT Apr-19#53 Compared with historical data collected over centuries)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 53

    Compared with historical data collected over centuries, this year suggest seismic motion was consistent with displacement new information will help scientists better predict geologic at the full convergence rate. From the results of his missions, activity. Dr. Chadwell concluded the Wave Gliders have

  • MT Apr-19#52 ver the past 20 years, great strides have been made  Sea?)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    ver the past 20 years, great strides have been made Sea? oor geodesy projects are underway across the globe, all in the ability to observe and monitor the worlds’ in pursuit of scienti? c advances that will help us crack the ocean. Just think that less than two decades ago, one code on earthquake and

  • MT Apr-19#46 tech delivers cost savings and Waagen’s Test Center)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 46

    tech delivers cost savings and Waagen’s Test Center attracts A place to grow Along with the 1,100-square-meter testing and training cen- wind power entrepreneurs, ? oating or marine wind power con- ter backed by The Switch — plus researchers, equipment and tinues to grow. Since Equinor’s launch of a

  • MT Apr-19#39 waii, underwater mining tools target the whole gamut of)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 39

    waii, underwater mining tools target the whole gamut of min- of major offshore acreage awards. Deepsea miner, Ocean ing support tasks. Minerals, says REEs are “17 chemically similar metals con- sisting of the 15 elements known as the lanthanides plus yt- High-stakes ops trium and scandium” and they’re of

  • MT Apr-19#23 and when you add a higher tempera- stars keep urchins)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 23

    and when you add a higher tempera- stars keep urchins under control,” ture to that, it kills faster, causing a said Joseph Gaydos, senior author on bigger impact.” the paper and director of UC Davis’ Fisheries depend on nearshore kelp SeaDoc Society program. “Without forests to form a healthy environmen

  • MT Apr-19#22 Case Study Science
Sea Star Population in Danger
The)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 22

    Case Study Science Sea Star Population in Danger The combination of ocean warming have stayed so low in the past three est ocean, and it is not recovering in the and an infectious wasting disease has years, we consider them endangered in same way experienced by the intertidal devastated populations of

  • MR May-19#61 FERRIES: FERRY SAFETY & SECURITY
John Waterhouse of)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    FERRIES: FERRY SAFETY & SECURITY John Waterhouse of Elliott Bay Design Group was conference MC and presented on a ferry project that he is involved with for Lake Victoria. Photo Courtesy Alain Haig-Brown prove worldwide ferry safety, especially In recent years Thailand has been trou- will be developed

  • MR May-19#58 FERRIES: FERRY SAFETY & SECURITY
A look inside the fragmente)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    FERRIES: FERRY SAFETY & SECURITY A look inside the fragmented ferry industry, which recently held a Ferry Safety & Security event in Bangkok. Ferries Alan Haig-Brown reports from Thailand ? re and explosion and bottom damage “Death Toll in Phoenix Boat Accident Rises to 44” ... “Deadly Fire all

  • MR May-19#51 MARINE PROPULSION • THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
Stiefel, WinGD)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    MARINE PROPULSION • THOUGHT LEADERSHIP Stiefel, WinGD Quite a challenge Also in 2018, Cummins announced that ? shing and passenger transport. The ma- between 450 horsepower (336 kW) and and raising the bar. I believe a “carbon a version of its popular X15 engine was rine X15 is designed to withstand

  • MR May-19#8 O
OPENING SHOT
Joseph Keefe
Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck))
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    O OPENING SHOT Joseph Keefe Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the editor of both Maritime Logistics Professional and MarineNews magazines. He can be reached at jkeefe@maritimeprofessional.com INFRASTRUCTURE ‘101’ Part II “… U.S. Infrastructure Needs More

  • MR May-19#6 MARITIME
Editorial
REPORTER
AND
ENGINEERING NEWS
John E.)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    MARITIME Editorial REPORTER AND ENGINEERING NEWS John E. O’Malley: 1930-2019 M A R I N E L I N K . C O M HQ 118 E. 25th St., 2nd Floor New York, NY 10010 USA Tel +1 212 477 6700 Fax +1 212 254 6271 www.marinelink.com FL Of? ce 215 NW 3rd St Boynton Beach, FL 33435-4009 Tel +1 561 732 4368 Fax +1 561 732

  • MN May-19#58 PRODUCTS
Furuno’s 12KW Radar for 
Inland Waterways)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 58

    PRODUCTS Furuno’s 12KW Radar for Inland Waterways Furuno has introduced a higher-pow- ered FR1918VBB River Radar. With a 12kW output and all of the same critical features and functionality of its “little brother”, the FR1918VBB will enhance the situational awareness of any river vessel. The

  • MN May-19#53 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Downey HewittGallagher Drees Marshall)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Downey HewittGallagher Drees Marshall Morris belief in the value and concept of a operations, ? rst as COO and then as Hurtigruten Appoints Downey public education, coupled with a life president. In 2014, Drees was promot- as Americas President Hurtigruten has appointed John

  • MN May-19#43 INLAND OPERATOR PROFILE
tive advantages. Giveans explained)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 43

    INLAND OPERATOR PROFILE tive advantages. Giveans explained asset prices are low, not when markets how Kirby’s scale allows it to offer are on the upswing. Prices and rates contracts of affreighment (COAs), are now rising and the demand out- wherein a certain volume of cargo look looks promising

  • MN May-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
May 2019
Volume 30)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews May 2019 Volume 30 Number 5 Tom Ewing is a freelance writ- ance Company and has been er specializing in energy and Manager of its MOPS Marine Li- environmental issues. cense Insurance division since 1984. Over the past 29 years, James A. Kearns has rep- Mr. O’Neill

  • MN May-19#6 EDITOR’S NOTE
s we fast approach midyear 2019, it is time)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    EDITOR’S NOTE s we fast approach midyear 2019, it is time for our annual Inland Waterways edition. Indeed, much of the emerging news foretell better times ahead for inland operators and their customers. That reality is balanced by the fact that there is plenty left to accom- A plish, and still more in the

  • MP Q1-19#48 Advertiser Index
Page Company     Website Phone#
5)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    Advertiser Index Page Company Website Phone# 5 Breakbulk Europe www.europe.breakbulk.com Visit our website C2 CPE Certi?ed Port Executive www.certi?edportexecutive.com (902) 425-3980 31 Hans Kuenz GmbH www.kuenz.com +43 5574 6883 0 3 Kalmar www.kalmarglobal.com Please visit us

  • MP Q1-19#28 Container Ports
Credit: Port NY/NJ 
The growth in part can)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 28

    Container Ports Credit: Port NY/NJ The growth in part can be attributed to the completion in June 2017 of the Bayonne Bridge Navigational Clearance Project, which raised the clearance under the bridge from 151 feet to 215 feet, allowing the world’s largest container ships to pass under it and serve port

  • MR Apr-19#57 T
TECH FILES
Proud distributor of:
Offshore Heavy Lift)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    T TECH FILES Proud distributor of: Offshore Heavy Lift Re? t &390DQXIDFWXULQJ 503 School House Road While the re? t of heavy lift capac- ing project which involved weveral Li- Kennett Square, PA 19348 ity onboard an offshore rig might sound ebherr companies. The contract drafting USA www.cpvmfg.com mundan

  • MR Apr-19#54 T
TECH FILES
KVH: NEW 
VSAT ANTENNA
KVH introduced the)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    T TECH FILES KVH: NEW VSAT ANTENNA KVH introduced the Trac- HGG: Ship Pro? ler Automates Cutting Phone V11-HTS, and antenna that the company dubs ‘the world’s fastest’ 1 meter Ku/C- HGG’S new UPC 450 Ship Pro? ler increases cutting and pre-fabrication band maritime VSAT antenna. productivity by

  • MR Apr-19#34 CRUISE SHIPPING • LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS
“I would say let’s)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    CRUISE SHIPPING • LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS “I would say let’s look for vessel types that are regional where you can take the human element out of it because of either monotony or safety. I think you’ll see it in survey vessels, I think you’ll see it in workboats; I think you’ll see it in coastal protec- tion

  • MR Apr-19#22 M
MARKET: OFFSHORE WIND
moves, New Yorkers could have)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 22

    M MARKET: OFFSHORE WIND moves, New Yorkers could have rela- the size of towers and blades, construc- noted, wind investments will be an eco- Roberta Reardon said, “This (offshore tively inexpensive, competitively priced tion of offshore wind projects requires nomic driver, impacting everything from

  • MR Apr-19#21 M
MARKET: OFFSHORE WIND
from choosing a contractor to)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 21

    M MARKET: OFFSHORE WIND from choosing a contractor to securing tive answer, referencing generation costs ? gure would be competitive and favor- reasoning, is the time for bold leadership money for payment. Third, state utility for an upcoming Massachusetts project able for NY. Again, NY will need

  • MR Apr-19#19 . 
led by the University of Rhode Island 
(URI)’s Graduate School)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    multi-year deployment, the U.S. National Academies of Scienc- with companies involved in the 2010 operations in the Gulf. led by the University of Rhode Island (URI)’s Graduate School of Oceanogra- phy, will monitor the Loop Current Sys- tem (LCS) using Sonardyne’s Pressure Inverted Echo Sounders (PIES)