Green Line

  • Edward Lundquist talks to welder and apprentice instructor Ashley Wilber at BAE Systems Ship Repair’s Norfolk shipyard.

    Tell me how you came to be a welder here at BAE Systems Ship Repair.

        I have been here at BAE Systems going on seven years now.  I was just doing odd jobs out of high school – Hardee’s, driving jobs like delivering pizzas – anything that was making money.  I have a cousin, who at the time was an electrician apprentice, and he was telling me about the shipyard.  I’d never heard of a shipyard even though I drove past it all the time.  I would always look to see if the Disney boat was in the dry dock.  I’d say, “Hey, that’s Mickey Mouse.  What is it doing in there?” I just never knew what it was.
    My cousin told me about the apprenticeship program, and how it was a good opportunity—you go to school, work and get a paycheck.  It sounded like something to look into, so I began to research each trade to see what was in high demand and who was hiring for that trade at that time.  If things didn’t work out at the shipyard, would I be able to find work?  I applied and was accepted.  I decided that welding was what I really wanted to do. I was selected, went through my four years, and graduated from with my Associate’s Degree in Maritime Technologies from Tidewater Community College as valedictorian.  I was also Virginia Ship Repair Association (VSRA) Junior Tradesman of the Year for the area.
    My instructor was my mentor.  He was very knowledgeable, and I really looked up to him.  Working with him, I was trained and certified as an aluminum welder, and assigned to do 5 XXX critical welding on the cruisers.  I became a crew leader directly after graduation.  After a couple of months of being a crew leader, I was designated “STRIPES,” which is a supervisor lead person; and a couple of months into that, I was working on the LHDs – the big deck amphibious ships – doing aluminum foundations.  The company sent me to Hawaii for five and a half months to help with the removal and replacement of uptakes on the USS Port Royal and USS Chosin.  I was a welder on the Port Royal, then a supervisor on the Chosin, and led the crew out there.  We finished a couple months ahead of schedule; I was very proud of how that job came out.  When I returned to the yard in Norfolk, I wanted to see what it was like on the other side of the “green line.”  In the shipyard, there’s a green line literally painted on the ground.  On one side is the production area where you have to wear all of your safety and personal protective equipment.  The other side is the offices, and guys that get us the work out here on these ships.

    So you took an office job?

        I applied to be a contract estimator, and got a position estimating on government contracts.  A lot of times, as you get into the availability, a job will grow, and requires additional funding.  I would estimate it, and negotiate a reasonable price with the customer to fix that certain item. But after about nine months I realized that I still wanted to weld, and be a part of the weld shop.  The desk was not for me.  Sadly, my mentor passed away and his position became open.  My instructor motivated me, pushed me through and showed me some good skills that I felt I could pass on to the up and coming apprentices.  I talked to the head of the shop and told him I really wanted to be an apprentice instructor. I was chosen for the position.  Now I’m an apprentice instructor and a craft supervisor.  My first priority is the apprentices, but I also help out with certain jobs on the ships, and maintain procedures and certifications, and I certify everyone in the yard who is qualified to weld—subcontractors, welders, ship fitters, and mechanics.  If you are going to weld any type of material, you come through me first.  We are in the process of getting new procedures and certifications so we can be able to weld different things—the more we can weld, the more work we can get.

    When you are instructing apprentices, do you have anything to do with their classes at school?


        I am involved as far as keeping them up on their grades, their attendance and their studies.  If I get a report that a person is not doing so well, I pull them in and talk to them, and let them know about tutoring or other classes or resources that are available to them. They have core classes such as English, reading, and math.   The apprentice program trains you for leadership, with public speaking classes along with Excel and PowerPoint.  But when you first get into the program you also have a class called “Ships Nomenclature.” For me, since I had never been on a ship, this class was my first introduction to the shipyard.    I learned how to get around on a ship, tie knots, and basic safety practices.  Some people take it lightly, but it’s a very important class, and if you have never been on a ship, it’s vital.

    What’s involved with the welding school, and what do you teach there?


        The company made a significant investment in a new training facility.  My apprentices rotate through the weld school every six months and receive different certifications each time.  Mechanics that come through are given the same training and guidance as an apprentice, just in a shorter time.  I train them all to do good quality work on the vessels.

    Is it a case where some people pick things up faster, and others may take a little longer to get certified?

    Some need a little extra guidance.  That’s why they come to the school.  I don’t hesitate to grab my welding gear and give them a demonstration of what I expect of them.

    So a welder here at BAE Systems Ship Repair doesn’t specialize as an aluminum-only welder, or a steel welder.  They’re going to learn how to weld steel and aluminum. 
    The more certifications you have the more flexible you are.  We try not to limit a welder.  If we feel you’re capable of receiving a certification, we go ahead and try to give it to you.  Some have a harder time grasping a concept, so we let them work with what they have and try for additional certifications at a later time.  Aluminum takes more skill and patience than standard steel certifications.

    Why is aluminum harder?


        The testing is much stricter.  For example, when they conduct NDT—nondestructive testing—they put dye penetrate on it and if it bleeds through, then it’s a bad weld.  Steel is not as strict.  Some ships have superstructure made out of aluminum, and with all the twisting and turning from the ship, that soft material cracks easily.  Aluminum is a lightweight, soft, low strength metal. Every time you get a ship in here it’s going to have some aluminum cracking.  The processes we use to weld aluminum gives you a highly concentrated heat zone to prevent distortion.

    As a craftsman, what’s the difference between welding steel and welding aluminum? 


        With steel, you can weld, clean it and get your supervisor to do a visual test and you can walk away.  Aluminum is a completely different material; and it’s inspected to a higher standard than steel.  It has to be good, sound metal; look good; be clean; and stand up to the non-destructive testing process.  It’s just not getting a visual inspection, they’re actually conducting test.  With 5XXX aluminum, every weld pass has to be checked by a QA inspector, which takes more time to finish the job. If it is not done properly, it will show. Basically, there is no way to cover up bad welding with aluminum.

    Do you use robotic welding?

        We have machines—called Moggies—in the shop that we were testing and getting certified on to weld different material in different positions.  We have an aluminum Moggy for our big inserts.  The way it works is you set it up, set the temperature and put it on track and instead of someone sitting there taking three days to weld it by hand; you can take a few hours and get the job done right and in less time.

    Do you still need a certified welder to set that up?

        You have to be certified.  We go through the whole process of checking every layer as if it was on the ship as a critical weld in a controlled environment passing the non-destructive testing.  The yard itself is certified and we do have certified mechanics. 

    So that would be something that you would do in a fabrication shop before you bring it over to the ship.

        Yes.  We have a fabrication shop in the yard where we put together a lot of big pieces then take them to the ship to be installed.

    What do you find to be the most challenging part of teaching welding?

        The different people .  Everyone has different personalities, and they learn at a different rate.  What one person may get, others may not, so you have to spend more time with them. Sometimes an apprentice does not understand a particular certification and I have to skip over that procedure with them. I research different ways of explaining and teaching different processes.  I don’t know it all and I have to do my own research.  So if I have a person that’s struggling on one thing and I feel that I’m not getting through to them, then I will try to find a different way to show them that they may grasp. 

    What do you find most gratifying about teaching apprentices?

        When they get it after I have shown them different ways of approaching it. When they pass the test, they smile and feel good about themselves—it’s like a kid at Christmas.  I feel good because I helped them do something that they are proud of. I feel like I’ve had a good day if I helped at least one person.

    What do you see for you in the future?


        I’m not sure.  I’ve already been over in the office, but I wasn’t ready to get away from the shop.  I wasn’t ready to leave welding.  I still go on the ships regularly and might come back over the green line, you never know.  But for now, I’m happy where I’m at.  Welding is my passion.  If I’m not welding, I would like to help someone else learn how to weld.

    Do you see a greater influx of women getting into the program?

        As far as welding goes, I have seen it grow in the apprenticeship program.  We’ve gone from one to two females, and now we have five.  I see it continuing to grow.  They say females make better welders, anyway.  We have a steady hand.

    I think over the years people think of welding as a man’s job, but people are now realizing that it’s a profession, a trade that anyone can aspire to.  So what would you say to somebody who was thinking about becoming a tradesperson, perhaps in the ship repair, ship building industry?


        Do your research.  Look into it and make sure that’s what you want to do, especially working in the shipyard.  You’re outside working in the elements.  You might get wet, and maybe you can’t weld that day.  You’re producing heat, and maybe it’s already 90 degrees out there.  So you have to be prepared for it.  Some people think about welding equals money.  That’s all good and fine, but you have to like what you’re doing first; you have to want to learn; and you have to get good at it so you can make money.  You have to have that passion. You have to get into it.

    Is welding something that virtually anyone can learn, or do you need to have an aptitude for it?

        If you asked me this a couple years ago, I would have said anybody can weld.  When I was an apprentice, and would go out on the boat, and all around me were guys that could weld; who had passed the test; and had the experience.  But now, as an apprentice instructor and seeing students come in straight from high school, or maybe different companies where they did more book work and not so much hands on welding, I see now that it’s not for everyone. 

    Do you ever sometimes think about what you would be doing if you hadn’t become an apprentice here?

        I would probably be looking in the paper for a job, seeing who is paying the most. I don’t know.  I do know I’m glad I am here at BAE Systems at this point in my career. I would not want to be anywhere else right now.
     

     

    (As published in the November 2013 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - www.marinelink.com)

  • condition should be at least 3 dB, and preferably more than 10 dB, higher than the (non-cavitating) background noise. The figure shows background noise (green line) and cavitation noise (blue line) measured at model scale.    Test conditions are based on propulsion characteristics of the ship and the scale

  • year or early in 1992. A subsidiary of American Automar, Washington, will receive $34.8 million for the charter of the American Kestrel. Either the Green Island or the Green Valley will be supplied by Central Gulf Lines Inc, New Orleans, for $39.9 million. It will also charter the Austral Rainbow

  • A 2,800 passenger Ro-Pax ferry being built at Meyer Turku for Tallink, will be fitted with ballast water management system (MMC BWMS) from MMC Green Technology. MMC Green Technology, a Norwegian manufacturer of ballast water treatment systems, have sold more than 70 systems since it went commercial with

  • they are being conducted in accordance with international regulations and industry best practices. One such company involved in this field of work is Grieg Green whose main office is located in Oslo, Norway.  Mrs. Elin Saltkjel, Head of Quality Assurance and Business Development at Grieg Green offered insight

  • . The 6.5-mile 10-inch lines were installed by McDermott's Derrick Barge 28 from the Conoco's Central Production Platform (CPP) in 620 feet of water in Green Canyon Block 52 to a tie-in point in Green Canyon Block 139 in 1,070 feet of water. McDermott also installed a unified connector skid (UCS) for

  • Italian classification society RINA has launched Green Star, which it is dubbing the new environmental standard for shipping. The recently delivered Costa Atlantic from Kvaerner Masa-Yards for Costa Crociere is the first ship to meet the green standard, earning both the Clean Sea and Clean air

  • There are two kinds of green. At Long Beach, the commitment to environmental progress remains at the forefront of the port’s business plan. That’s just smart business.   A March 2017 visit to the Port of Long Beach provided a close-up view of one of America’s premier seaports. Most stakeholders already

  • The Navy's newest crane ship, SS Green Mountain State (T-ACS 9), was named recently during a ceremony at Norfolk Shipbuilding and Drydock Corporation, in Norfolk, Va. The ship, named for the state of Vermont, will be under the operational control of the Navy's Military Sealift Command. The principal

  • , 150 and 220 Stella Maris stern tube lubricant provides biodegradability and lubricity to protect metal surfaces, while meeting VGP requirements. Panolin’s Green Marine line, Stella Maris stern tube lubricant is environmentally considerate, biodegradable and negligibly toxic. www.panolinamerica.com (As

  • of Defense cargo. —$55,093,944 to Central Gulf Lines, Incorporated of New Orleans, La., for the charter of two U.S.-flag dry cargo ships, MV Green Wave ($25,074,939) and SS Rover ($30,019,005). MV Green Wave will continue to resupply Greenland and the Antarctic, and SS Rover will be assigned

  • with 18 vessels (RoRo and General cargo) and 110 years of experience to team with NAPA and ClassNK recently for an onboard trial of the new ClassNK-NAPA GREEN ship efficiency software to help identify, in real time, specific areas where its ship was wasting energy. “We wanted to be sure to identify exactly

  • MR Nov-19#96 . . . .(985) 384-3060 C2Pacific Green Marine Technologies .)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 96

    . . . . . . . .(330) 963-6310 65Conrad Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.conradindustries.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(985) 384-3060 C2Pacific Green Marine Technologies . .www.pacific.green\marine . . . . . . . . . . . .Please visit us online 48Daihatsu Diesel MFG. CO., LTD. . . . .www.dhtd.co.jp

  • MR Nov-19#83 ?
%RDW/,)(DGLYLVLRQRI/LIH,QGXVWULHV proud manufacturers of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    ? %RDW/,)(DGLYLVLRQRI/LIH,QGXVWULHV proud manufacturers of boat sealants, cleaners, compounds, waxes and epoxies, is now celebrating 60 years in the marine industry. With a longstanding reputation for quality, affordability, and trust, we are pleased to serve various marine industries on an ongoing basis.

  • MR Nov-19#76 M
MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE
Crew Care: Managing Mariner)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 76

    M MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE Crew Care: Managing Mariner Medical Care By Joe Keefe he competent authority shall as the population on shore enjoys. But, the embarking any mariner, a trusted 2012. There are several key aspects to require that, prior to begin- that’s not always the case. In case of

  • MR Nov-19#75 E
EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES
AMETEK Land Emissions)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 75

    E EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES AMETEK Land Emissions Monitoring AMETEK Land, a provider of combus- tion ef? ciency and environmental pollutant emissions monitoring instrumentation, has launched two new continuous emission mon- itoring systems (PM-CEMS) to provide accu- rate and reliable measurement of

  • MR Nov-19#74  a model for electrical  from green electricity generated)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 74

    generated via electrolysis vessel’s operating pro? le, and to provide a versatile and safe push boat, but in particular as a model for electrical from green electricity generated by wind power. solution. ‘eTug’ Powered by Battery, Hydrogen Fuel Cell Tokyo Kisen Co., Ltd. and e5 Lab Inc. have jointly developed

  • MR Nov-19#72 , founder and CEO, Paci?  c Green Technologies
s part of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 72

    E EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS Scrubbers: A 360-degree solution for shipowners and the environment By Scott Poulter, founder and CEO, Paci? c Green Technologies s part of the IMO’s com- vessel to LNG would be prohibitively ies being built are super-modern and will The second compelling reason to in- mitme

  • MR Nov-19#65 VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE,)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 65

    VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE, LLOYD’S REGISTER what we believe will be prototype ves- LR research suggests that the cheap- as weather routing but these can only Digitalization has also enabled LR to sels, contracted and constructed in the est zero carbon fuels are going to be go

  • MR Nov-19#63 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
for installation)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry.

  • MR Nov-19#57 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
Furthermore, all of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING Furthermore, all of this material can be torious harmful shipbreaking operations, give them business. So there has to be a an actual ship recycling project to ? nd traced downstream to a licenced disposal it appears that the desirability of ship balance. You cannot

  • MR Nov-19#56 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
Mrs. Saltkjel stated)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING Mrs. Saltkjel stated, “We are careful not but choose not to follow the regulations In order to ensure that EU SSR and HKC are making procedures that ? t the actual to use the words ‘certifying’ or ‘validat- when they are not being externally moni- are adhered to

  • MR Nov-19#55 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
states when the recipient)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING states when the recipient country cannot though not rati? ed by the requisite num- be required to have an initial survey to been uniquely tailored to the vessel. deal with the waste in line with the Con- ber of countries representing 40% of verify the inventory of

  • MR Nov-19#54 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
n May 2014 National)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING n May 2014 National Geograph- is tremendous pressure from both gov- The Wrong Way to Recycle A Vessels a cash buyer, the new owner will use a ic wrote an in-depth article on ernment regulators and within the ship- To place pressure on both shipowners number of different

  • MR Nov-19#52 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
Green Ship 
Recycling
A)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING Green Ship Recycling A vessel placed in dry-dock in prepara- tion for recycling. Photos: Grieg Green Ship scrapping has long been controversial, the province of poorer na- tion with a laundry list of safety and environmental hazards. But times are changing, and Grieg

  • MR Nov-19#46 SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER
the region. The)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER the region. The Coast Guard is the sole to man, and there are signi? cant natu- economic investments with every Arctic Urgent requirement provider and operator of the U.S. polar ral resources there,” said Coast Guard nation in key strategic areas, such as oil

  • MR Nov-19#43 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
Are the Z-drives as)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY Are the Z-drives as robust as conven- off the exterior edges of the propeller. you have more of an effect on slowing awesome, it is just a phenomenal orga- tional? No. But life is a compromise and You can have a cort nozzle that solves down the vessel at 90 degrees than

  • MR Nov-19#42 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
That’s signi?  cant …)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY That’s signi? cant … were questions in the industry as to the solution. In my ? rst 12 months my con- gether.” And from that point on, we have It is signi? cant. There are still naysay- units robustness. versations with ZF were challenging to re? ned the Z-drive we

  • MR Nov-19#41 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
“No vessel can maneuver)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY “No vessel can maneuver a tow into or out of a dock as good as the Z drive. And then you start talking about bumps and bruises on your barges, a lot of which come when you’re docking and undocking ... the safety contribution that Z-drives makes to marine transpor- tation

  • MR Nov-19#40 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
Photos: ZF/Martin)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 40

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY Photos: ZF/Martin Meissner Career development. Opportunity and investing in the Statistics.” In short it says is you can make statistics say boats at the 11:30 watch change so that we can have as people. And we have gone way out of our way to put whatever you want.

  • MR Nov-19#15 I
INSIGHTS: LEGAL BEAT
tion clauses that are not drafted)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    I INSIGHTS: LEGAL BEAT tion clauses that are not drafted by trial the parties may not be able to contract tract at issue. However, reliance on old huge drafting error: defense and indem- attorneys, but instead by transactional around these state laws with a choice of forms will likely not provide the

  • MR Nov-19#12 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeLogisticsProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com The Internet of Maritime Things he Internet of Maritime

  • MR Nov-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: TRAINING TIPS FOR SHIPS
Murray Goldberg is CEO)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: TRAINING TIPS FOR SHIPS Murray Goldberg is CEO of Marine Learning Systems which provides software and services to optimize knowledge, skills and behavior in maritime operators. In his former life he was a computer science faculty member at the University of BC researching online learning and

  • MR Nov-19#7 simple isn)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 7

    simple isn't always easy... But furuno radars are a simple choice Your objective is simple…Deliver your vessel and its contents safely and on time. While it might sound simple, we know it’s not easy! Whether you’re navigating the open ocean, busy harbors, or through congested inland waterways, being aware

  • MR Nov-19#6 MARITIME
Editorial
REPORTER
AND
ENGINEERING NEWS
M A R I N)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    MARITIME Editorial REPORTER AND ENGINEERING NEWS M A R I N E L I N K . C O M HQ 118 E. 25th St., 2nd Floor New York, NY 10010 USA Tel +1 212 477 6700 Fax +1 212 254 6271 www.marinelink.com FL Of? ce 215 NW 3rd St Boynton Beach, FL 33435-4009 Tel +1 561 732 4368 Fax +1 561 732 6984 Publisher John C.

  • MR Nov-19#4  is founder & CEO of Paci? c Green Technologies.
Joseph Keefe)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    is CEO of Marine Learning Systems, maker of publications, print and electronic. MarineLMS. Poulter Keefe Scott Poulter is founder & CEO of Paci? c Green Technologies. Joseph Keefe is a 1980 (Deck) graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy and editor of MarineNews. Stoichevski William Stoichevski