The Outlook

  • The US Coast Guard has published its Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook.  This forward-facing document should be read by everyone in the Coast Guard and by those associated with the US maritime sector.  It is intended to guide the Service’s efforts in securing the strategically critical maritime transportation system (MTS) and the marine environment.  To accomplish this, the Coast Guard must be Semper Paratus – Always Ready, as it has been for most of its 228 years.  The Coast Guard must also be relevant – ready and able to accomplish the tasks important to the MTS and marine environment.  Finally, the Coast Guard must be responsive – performing its important tasks when (or before) they are most needed.
    Three major lines of effort have been identified for meeting the challenges ahead: (1) Facilitating Lawful Trade and Travel on Secure Waterways; (2) Modernizing Aids to Navigation and Mariner Information Systems; and (3) Transforming Workforce Capacity and Partnerships.

    Facilitating Lawful Trade and Travel on Secure Waterways
    The Outlook states that the Coast Guard’s role in enabling the uninterrupted flow of maritime commerce requires a multifaceted approach that includes managing risks to critical infrastructure; ensuring the efficient delivery of Coast Guard services; supporting uniform and consistent vessel and facility standards; and promoting resiliency and unity of effort among all MTS stakeholders.  As the lead federal agency protecting the MTS and the primary regulator of the maritime shipping industry, the Coast Guard advances American prosperity through securing ports and waterways that enable commerce and ensuring vessels are subject to uniform, consistent standards.  It must seek a balance between risks and costs to support the efficient flow of commerce while reducing the risk of disruption to the MTS.  To meet this challenge, the Coast Guard will work to mitigate risks to critical infrastructure; build resiliency within the MTS; and enhance unity of effort in the MTS.  

    Modernizing Aids to Navigation and Mariner Information Systems

    The Coast Guard must build the information, digital, and physical infrastructure to manage emerging sources of risk within America’s waterways brought about by the introduction of new technologies and operating constructs.  It has a responsibility to ensure America’s waterways and maritime industry employ innovative, state-of-the-art systems that ensure America’s competitiveness as a global trading partner.  It must also reduce or mitigate risk for mariners, vessels, and maritime resources.  The Coast Guard intends to support American waterways to become the most technologically advanced maritime transportation system in the world by developing a workforce best able to meet the needs of modern electronic, autonomous ship systems and new and emerging alternative fuels and propulsion systems.  It intends to deliver enhanced marine safety information to provide mariners with real-time, accessible, and relevant voyage planning data that will result in more efficient, economical, and safer transits, while accelerating the integration of modern navigation systems such as e-ATON into its system of buoys and beacons.  

    Transforming Workforce Capacity and Partnerships
    Given the increased demand on America’s waterways, the Coast Guard must have a transforming workforce capability and strengthen linkages and partnerships to facilitate, safeguard, and advance maritime commerce.  It intends to leverage new technology to beneficially change the way the service conducts compliance and oversight through expanded use of condition-based monitoring, data, and analytics.  A Coast Guard mission-ready total workforce will possess the technical expertise to effectively audit and validate the new systems.  It will work to recruit, develop, and retain capable prevention and response professionals who can thrive in an environment characterized by constant changes in technology and tools.  It will also judiciously leverage the use of third-party organizations while ensuring that its own workforce retains the necessary competencies, proficiency, and technical expertise and is provided the doctrine, strategies, training, and education needed to manage and conduct proper oversight.  This is undoubtedly the most difficult to the three lines of effort facing the Coast Guard.  Constant change is challenging and unsettling to both institutions and individuals.

    Summary
    I agree with the new Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook but have a few comments.  The Outlook emphasizes maritime commerce (as the title implies) but gives short shrift to other traditional missions of the Coast Guard such as search and rescue (SAR), national defense, and recreational boating.  It also does not explain what role, if any, will be played by the Coast Guard Auxiliary.  It is possible, even likely, that the drafters of the Outlook viewed the document narrowly, not covering the full expanse of Coast Guard missions, but this is a significant document and is clearly intended to guide Coast Guard efforts for the near and mid-term.  Other than the above, the Outlook goes a long way toward providing Coast Guard members and employees and those who work with or are impacted by the service with a better understanding of where this national treasure is headed.
    One is either the agent of change or the subject of change.  The US Coast Guard has chosen to be forward-facing and an agent and facilitator of the changes necessary to move the nation’s marine transportation system into the future.



  • Houston, Texas, February 7-12 The seventh international symposium and exhibit on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, OMAE '88, sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering Division, will be held at the Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston

  • price environment that may continue given the capacity expansion projected for the industry overall, as well as the weakening economic outlook. The outlook is stable. In 2000 the industry including Royal Caribbean experienced flat to declining net yields as a result of competitive conditions.

  • in this latter period is still uncertain. The boom in LNG shipping could be postponed, once again, to beyond 1985. Recent developments improving the outlook for LNG shipping include the coming on-stream or the impending startup of some new projects and a reaffirmation of the status of other future projec

  • NavSea / MMA-Sponsored HM&E Conference Set For Arlington, November 27-28 Vice Adm. Peter Hekman, Commander of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NavSea), and James P. Fromfield, president of the Marine Machinery Association (MMA), recently announced their joint sponsorship of the first conference betwee

  • A PREVIEW The Second Annual National Maritime Show and Maritime America Conference will be held at the Baltimore Convention Center on March 29-31, 1983. Over 90 manufacturers and suppliers of marine-related equipment will display their range of products and services at the Baltimore facility.

  • The operators of many of the riverboat casinos along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers are likely to enjoy smooth sailing as growing demand, limited new supply, and relaxed regulations support stronger operating results and possibly rating upgrades, Moody's Investors Service reports. The rating agency

  • than the 6 percent increase anticipated in the “2014 Outlook” report. More telling are sentiments surrounding the Norwegian OSV market. According to the Outlook 2015 report, OSV owners expect turnover to fall by 4.2 percent in 2015, a number made more significant when you consider that it would mark the

  • tightening by other central banks will make deepwater projects more expensive   Overall, the net impact of these changes is slightly negative – but the outlook for a ramp up in production floater orders remains bullish. We now anticipate orders for 32 FPSOs and eight FPUs over the 2017/21 time period –

  • A growth in the demand for chemical tankers is possible dur- ing the next few years if the large number of export-oriented petrochemical projects now under construction come on stream as expected. A report from Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., of London, notes that 22 petrochemical complexes have

  • The Spring Meeting of the Great Lakes and Great Rivers Section of The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers will be held May 17 at the Quality Inn Riverview in Covington, Ky. The theme of this meeting will be oriented to "Rivers," and the following papers will be presented: "Maneuvering

  • REVIEW AND OUTLOOK The year 1982 began with a relatively healthy amount of work in hand but a weak order book. CSSRA yard employment reached a 10-year high of 14,200 in March but by December this had become a 10-year low of 8,500, a drop of 5,700 people or 40 percent of the work force. The economic

  • MR Nov-19#46  USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER
the region. The Coast Guard)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER the region. The Coast Guard is the sole to man, and there are signi? cant natu- economic investments with every Arctic Urgent requirement provider and operator of the U.S. polar ral resources there,” said Coast Guard nation in key strategic areas, such as oil

  • MR Nov-19#45  a ship  economic zone above the Arctic Circle).   ed. )
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    CUTTER Polar Security Cutter will provide meaningful presence in polar regions By Edward Lundquist he Coast Guard needs a ship economic zone above the Arctic Circle). ed. Protecting America’s interests in the Coast Guard leadership and presence that can do more than just The U.S. has also conducted

  • MR Oct-19#51  also have new chal-
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    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    eld of renewable power con- tudes. Many of these new requirements Polar waters will be increasingly imple- nology leaps, we also have new chal- cepts. The outlook of the marine power are focused on estimating real-time and mented in newbuild and modi? cation lenges which come with the aging of all generation

  • MR Oct-19#21  sulfur fuel, oil prod- Any further escalation of the situation)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 21

    T TANKER TRENDS tations for crude oil tanker demolitions ing and selling low sulfur fuel, oil prod- Any further escalation of the situation as around half of all seaborne crude oil in 2019 from 9m to 4m DWT. uct tankers will be employed to transport in the Persian Gulf would have a severe is transported

  • MN Mar-19#2  consortium recently proved the 
 
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    March 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CEO, Campbell Transportation Company LEGAL 28 Fuel Cells: industry examines options in race to zero emissions A maritime consortium recently proved the viability of a hydrogen fuel cell ferry designed for operations in the environmentally sensitive San Francisco Bay area. Features Credit: Port

  • MN Mar-19#Cover The Information Authority for the Workboat • Offshore •)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: Cover

    The Information Authority for the Workboat • Offshore • Inland • Coastal Marine Markets Volume 30 • Number 3 arine MARCH 2019 www.marinelink.com News M Pushboats, Tugs & Assist Vessels The heart of the U.S. merchant feet Hybrid Propulsion Quietly … positioned to explode Regulatory Review USCG: 10% enforceme

  • MT Jul-19#12  more than 30 million jobs and  The Commandant is clearly passionate)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 12

    MTR 100 Greg Trauthwein support more than 30 million jobs and The Commandant is clearly passionate increased vulnerability. We’re building $5.4 trillion in economic activity. about all matters maritime, and he real- out our cyber capability at the Coast A key document for Admiral Schultz’s izes too

  • MP Q3-19#16 , existing fossil fuel power. The trans- cargo, breakbulk)
    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    to generate enough power to supplement, and of cargo types alongside; including large and heavy project in some cases replace, existing fossil fuel power. The trans- cargo, breakbulk, steel and dry bulk commodities. portation of such turbine blades requires careful planning and The assurance of frequent sailings

  • MP Q3-19#14  is at its most ?  erce and the MPV 
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    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 14

    its toll on both project and commodity trades, cutting down volumes at a time when external compe- tition from non-MPV carriers is at its most ? erce and the MPV ? eet is still struggling with overcapacity. Still, and as it has been noted by a number of stakeholders, the number of ves- sels with lift capacity

  • MP Q3-19#2 , both of which hinge 
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    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 2

    July/August 2019 Volume 9 Number 4 CONTENTS “Freight rate recovery will depend on decreased capacity and increased cargo options, both of which hinge on the resolution of current political debates. A trade agreement between the US and China and the reduction or dissolution of current tariffs should improve

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    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    submittals, followed by the award of the Polar Security Cutter be- ing a highlight. How does it look for the coming 12 months? We are encouraged by the outlook for our govern- Guard’s Polar Security Cutters. Please give a state- ment and commerce opportunities in the coming year. head pro? le weld station

  • MN Aug-19#15  PRODUCTION
SYSTEMS
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    August 2019 - Marine News page: 15

    POWERFUL MARKET INTELLIGENCE FLOATING PRODUCTION SYSTEMS Projects in the Planning Stage, Units on Order Installed Systems and Available Units UNPARALLELED BUSINESS INSIGHTS, DATA, AND MARKET ANALYTICS COVERING: U(251sU6.2s ???G?????????????????G?? U5'/+sU(547s U52#4s ÏYEARLY OUTLOOK We don’t just

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    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MR Jul-19#52  SHOW NORSHIPPING 2019
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    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TRADE SHOW NORSHIPPING 2019 lished by the UN Global Compact, a UN sponsored group to assist companies in aligning their operations with UN principles, the strategy laid out 17 “Global Goals” divided into the categories of a healthy, produc- tive, and well-governed oceans. “All the 17 goals are deeply

  • MR Jul-19#38 , provides a ‘birds eye view’ on the robust and diverse business)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    Flying into New Orleans with Admiral Karl Schultz, Commandant, USCG, provides a ‘birds eye view’ on the robust and diverse business in and around the lower Mississippi River. Photo: Greg Trauthwein ADMIRAL SCHULTZ ON U.S. SHIPBUILDING ast month Maritime Reporter of shoreline, 25,000 miles of navigable

  • MR Jul-19#12  a collective call to action for the 
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    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    GHG EMISSIONS Gurinder Singh Gurinder Singh is Director of Global Sustainability, at ABS. Course to Low Carbon Shipping n a collective call to action for the decarbonization of shipping last year, 34 signatory CEOs from the Iindustry made clear that efforts to signi? cantly lower the carbon footprint

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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 3rd Cover

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MR Jun-19#28 2019
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 28

    2019 sunshine in their bottom lines. They may get their wish. mented the market for towboats is. By comparison, the to drive up production costs by 2%-3% annually. This In fact, as much as 41 percent – a whopping 17,596 Harbor/Escort market is dominated by two companies, in turn will have a negative

  • MR Jun-19#24  2020
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    F FUEL: LOGISTICS Benchmarking IMO 2020 By Barry Parker “One of the biggest shake-ups in the and are current prices for future dates.” duced essentially anywhere. Tightening pliant VLSFO in Asia – Singapore, Thai- product markets is right around the cor- These wind currents will depend on ac- the standard

  • MT Jun-19#9  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 9

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MT Apr-19#15  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 15

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MT May-19#32  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 32

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MR May-19#87  TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 87

    REAL TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS The LNG industry is going through a dramatic transformation. Our 2019 Annual Outlook and real-time FLNG/FSRU database is unique. It is not simply a static report, rather a dynamic and ever-changing database with a continuously updated wealth of

  • MN May-19#10  NDUSTRY
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    May 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    in the United States: shipbuilding. gether accounted for more than 50% of production, both in terms of units and value. HIPBUILDING NDUSTRY U.S. S I The outlook for Tugboats and Towboats is good. In According to the report, currently there are approxi- terms of volume, Tugboats production is forecast to