The Outlook

  • The US Coast Guard has published its Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook.  This forward-facing document should be read by everyone in the Coast Guard and by those associated with the US maritime sector.  It is intended to guide the Service’s efforts in securing the strategically critical maritime transportation system (MTS) and the marine environment.  To accomplish this, the Coast Guard must be Semper Paratus – Always Ready, as it has been for most of its 228 years.  The Coast Guard must also be relevant – ready and able to accomplish the tasks important to the MTS and marine environment.  Finally, the Coast Guard must be responsive – performing its important tasks when (or before) they are most needed.
    Three major lines of effort have been identified for meeting the challenges ahead: (1) Facilitating Lawful Trade and Travel on Secure Waterways; (2) Modernizing Aids to Navigation and Mariner Information Systems; and (3) Transforming Workforce Capacity and Partnerships.

    Facilitating Lawful Trade and Travel on Secure Waterways
    The Outlook states that the Coast Guard’s role in enabling the uninterrupted flow of maritime commerce requires a multifaceted approach that includes managing risks to critical infrastructure; ensuring the efficient delivery of Coast Guard services; supporting uniform and consistent vessel and facility standards; and promoting resiliency and unity of effort among all MTS stakeholders.  As the lead federal agency protecting the MTS and the primary regulator of the maritime shipping industry, the Coast Guard advances American prosperity through securing ports and waterways that enable commerce and ensuring vessels are subject to uniform, consistent standards.  It must seek a balance between risks and costs to support the efficient flow of commerce while reducing the risk of disruption to the MTS.  To meet this challenge, the Coast Guard will work to mitigate risks to critical infrastructure; build resiliency within the MTS; and enhance unity of effort in the MTS.  

    Modernizing Aids to Navigation and Mariner Information Systems

    The Coast Guard must build the information, digital, and physical infrastructure to manage emerging sources of risk within America’s waterways brought about by the introduction of new technologies and operating constructs.  It has a responsibility to ensure America’s waterways and maritime industry employ innovative, state-of-the-art systems that ensure America’s competitiveness as a global trading partner.  It must also reduce or mitigate risk for mariners, vessels, and maritime resources.  The Coast Guard intends to support American waterways to become the most technologically advanced maritime transportation system in the world by developing a workforce best able to meet the needs of modern electronic, autonomous ship systems and new and emerging alternative fuels and propulsion systems.  It intends to deliver enhanced marine safety information to provide mariners with real-time, accessible, and relevant voyage planning data that will result in more efficient, economical, and safer transits, while accelerating the integration of modern navigation systems such as e-ATON into its system of buoys and beacons.  

    Transforming Workforce Capacity and Partnerships
    Given the increased demand on America’s waterways, the Coast Guard must have a transforming workforce capability and strengthen linkages and partnerships to facilitate, safeguard, and advance maritime commerce.  It intends to leverage new technology to beneficially change the way the service conducts compliance and oversight through expanded use of condition-based monitoring, data, and analytics.  A Coast Guard mission-ready total workforce will possess the technical expertise to effectively audit and validate the new systems.  It will work to recruit, develop, and retain capable prevention and response professionals who can thrive in an environment characterized by constant changes in technology and tools.  It will also judiciously leverage the use of third-party organizations while ensuring that its own workforce retains the necessary competencies, proficiency, and technical expertise and is provided the doctrine, strategies, training, and education needed to manage and conduct proper oversight.  This is undoubtedly the most difficult to the three lines of effort facing the Coast Guard.  Constant change is challenging and unsettling to both institutions and individuals.

    Summary
    I agree with the new Maritime Commerce Strategic Outlook but have a few comments.  The Outlook emphasizes maritime commerce (as the title implies) but gives short shrift to other traditional missions of the Coast Guard such as search and rescue (SAR), national defense, and recreational boating.  It also does not explain what role, if any, will be played by the Coast Guard Auxiliary.  It is possible, even likely, that the drafters of the Outlook viewed the document narrowly, not covering the full expanse of Coast Guard missions, but this is a significant document and is clearly intended to guide Coast Guard efforts for the near and mid-term.  Other than the above, the Outlook goes a long way toward providing Coast Guard members and employees and those who work with or are impacted by the service with a better understanding of where this national treasure is headed.
    One is either the agent of change or the subject of change.  The US Coast Guard has chosen to be forward-facing and an agent and facilitator of the changes necessary to move the nation’s marine transportation system into the future.



  • Houston, Texas, February 7-12 The seventh international symposium and exhibit on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, OMAE '88, sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering Division, will be held at the Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston

  • price environment that may continue given the capacity expansion projected for the industry overall, as well as the weakening economic outlook. The outlook is stable. In 2000 the industry including Royal Caribbean experienced flat to declining net yields as a result of competitive conditions.

  • in this latter period is still uncertain. The boom in LNG shipping could be postponed, once again, to beyond 1985. Recent developments improving the outlook for LNG shipping include the coming on-stream or the impending startup of some new projects and a reaffirmation of the status of other future projec

  • NavSea / MMA-Sponsored HM&E Conference Set For Arlington, November 27-28 Vice Adm. Peter Hekman, Commander of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NavSea), and James P. Fromfield, president of the Marine Machinery Association (MMA), recently announced their joint sponsorship of the first conference betwee

  • A PREVIEW The Second Annual National Maritime Show and Maritime America Conference will be held at the Baltimore Convention Center on March 29-31, 1983. Over 90 manufacturers and suppliers of marine-related equipment will display their range of products and services at the Baltimore facility.

  • The operators of many of the riverboat casinos along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers are likely to enjoy smooth sailing as growing demand, limited new supply, and relaxed regulations support stronger operating results and possibly rating upgrades, Moody's Investors Service reports. The rating agency

  • than the 6 percent increase anticipated in the “2014 Outlook” report. More telling are sentiments surrounding the Norwegian OSV market. According to the Outlook 2015 report, OSV owners expect turnover to fall by 4.2 percent in 2015, a number made more significant when you consider that it would mark the

  • tightening by other central banks will make deepwater projects more expensive   Overall, the net impact of these changes is slightly negative – but the outlook for a ramp up in production floater orders remains bullish. We now anticipate orders for 32 FPSOs and eight FPUs over the 2017/21 time period –

  • A growth in the demand for chemical tankers is possible dur- ing the next few years if the large number of export-oriented petrochemical projects now under construction come on stream as expected. A report from Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., of London, notes that 22 petrochemical complexes have

  • The Spring Meeting of the Great Lakes and Great Rivers Section of The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers will be held May 17 at the Quality Inn Riverview in Covington, Ky. The theme of this meeting will be oriented to "Rivers," and the following papers will be presented: "Maneuvering

  • REVIEW AND OUTLOOK The year 1982 began with a relatively healthy amount of work in hand but a weak order book. CSSRA yard employment reached a 10-year high of 14,200 in March but by December this had become a 10-year low of 8,500, a drop of 5,700 people or 40 percent of the work force. The economic

  • MR Jun-19#3rd Cover  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 3rd Cover

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MR Jun-19#28 2019
sunshine in their bottom lines. They may get their)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 28

    2019 sunshine in their bottom lines. They may get their wish. mented the market for towboats is. By comparison, the to drive up production costs by 2%-3% annually. This In fact, as much as 41 percent – a whopping 17,596 Harbor/Escort market is dominated by two companies, in turn will have a negative

  • MR Jun-19#24  2020
By Barry Parker
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    F FUEL: LOGISTICS Benchmarking IMO 2020 By Barry Parker “One of the biggest shake-ups in the and are current prices for future dates.” duced essentially anywhere. Tightening pliant VLSFO in Asia – Singapore, Thai- product markets is right around the cor- These wind currents will depend on ac- the standard

  • MT Jun-19#9  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    June 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 9

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MT Apr-19#15  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 15

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MT May-19#32  just provide a snapshot of the sector.   Our online fully)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 32

    COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update all of the project information O LIVE - 24/7 ONLINE on a 24/7 basis. As we receive new informatio

  • MR May-19#87  TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR 
THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 87

    REAL TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS The LNG industry is going through a dramatic transformation. Our 2019 Annual Outlook and real-time FLNG/FSRU database is unique. It is not simply a static report, rather a dynamic and ever-changing database with a continuously updated wealth of

  • MN May-19#10  NDUSTRY
U.S. S  I The outlook for Tugboats and Towboats)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    in the United States: shipbuilding. gether accounted for more than 50% of production, both in terms of units and value. HIPBUILDING NDUSTRY U.S. S I The outlook for Tugboats and Towboats is good. In According to the report, currently there are approxi- terms of volume, Tugboats production is forecast to

  • MP Q1-19#33  and Beyond
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    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 33

    FUEL LOGISTICS – and Beyond ning to assuage the concerns about actual availability of VLSFO. Follow the Money From a ?nancial standpoint, the voyage has already been Like any new product roll-out, supplies will be available at ma- treacherous. Mr. Chris Hudson, from commodities specialist jor bunkering

  • MP Q1-19#14  supply chain.
or trucking, the outlook hasn’t changed much)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 14

    a real problem. Any transport mode is only as good as the one that immediately follows or precedes it in the intermodal supply chain. or trucking, the outlook hasn’t changed much in the last two cial driving age to 18. Fleet carriers will put pressure on insurance years: Too much freight and not enough

  • MP Q1-19#2  
automation at all, a lot of these 
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    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 2

    March/April 2019 Volume 9 Number 2 CONTENTS “If you think of a conventional terminal that’s not running any automation at all, a lot of these departments within the terminal run in a very ‘siloed’ fashion. As you start automating – whether it’s even semi-automating or completely automating – it’s no

  • MR Mar-19#27 CRUISE SHIPPING • THE MARKET REPORT
By Barry Parker
Cruising)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    CRUISE SHIPPING • THE MARKET REPORT By Barry Parker Cruising, which is a blend of the hos- date. Further out on the MSC horizon nérale as lead mandated lead arrang- of vessel design; the competition for pitality and maritime businesses, contin- are two new Seaside class (5,646 passen- er, Citibank N.A.

  • MR Mar-19#6  been an interesting sector of the maritime market, equal)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    .com Web Contributor Michelle Howard mhoward@marinelink.com Editorial Contributors Tom Mulligan - UK Cruise shipping has always been an interesting sector of the maritime market, equal heroes, and according to Doulis Lind- Lisa Overing - Florida Claudio Paschoa - Brazil parts hotel accommodation/entertainment

  • MP Q1-19#60  Iracy ePort
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    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 60

    STATISTICS IMB P r 2018: Iracy ePort iracy increased on the world’s seas in 2018, with a tical miles off Bonny Island, Nigeria. Two days later, Nigerian marked rise in attacks against ships and crews around pirates in a speedboat hijacked a tanker underway 100 nauti- PWest Africa, the International

  • MP Q1-19#8  it comes to cruise logistics in the coming year, there are)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 8

    Editor’s Note When it comes to cruise logistics in the coming year, there are three important ‘take- aways’ to be noted. First, 2019 is going to be a busy year in the global cruise sector. In Cruising many of the world’s national economies, there is a great deal of discretionary income that consumers

  • MR Feb-19#18  to 
start Maritime Reporter’s 
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    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    M MARKETS: Offshore Wind Energy Wind Energy Markets: Plenty of Supply, Growing Demand By Tom Ewing his is an honor: getting to start Maritime Reporter’s THE US ENERgY INFOR- new column on renewable MATION AdMINISTRA- Tofshore energy. In the com- ing months, this column will home in on TION (EIA) PROJECTS

  • MR Feb-19#14  at BC Ferries - one of the world’s largest ferry operators)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    executive, Mike Corrigan has been CEO of Interferry since April 2017. Previously he spent 14 years in lead- ership positions at BC Ferries - one of the world’s largest ferry operators - in his native Canada, the last fve as president and CEO. A Sustainable Future Interferry CEO Mike Corrigan explains

  • MR Feb-19#5  TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR 
THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS 
The)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 5

    REAL TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS The LNG industry is going through a dramatic transformation. Our 2019 Annual Outlook and real-time FLNG/FSRU database is unique. It is not simply a static report, rather a dynamic and ever-changing database with a continuously updated wealth of

  • MR Jan-19#46 MARITIME EMISSIONS • & the Internet of Things
IMO)
    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MARITIME EMISSIONS • & the Internet of Things IMO 2020, IoT & the Enviro Agenda While conservatism is a hallmark of maritime, research from Inmarsat ? nds that IoT may be helping turn the tech tide by delivering new solutions that ease rather than complicate compliance. With environmental imperatives try

  • MR Jan-19#36 . Shipyard Updates
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    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    U.S. Shipyard Updates With 2018 in the rearview mirror, Maritime Reporter & Engineering News takes stock of a challenging, but innovative year in and around U.S. shipyards, with a look ahead for what’s to come in 2019. By Lisa Overing All-American Marine looking at other government programs and participat-

  • MR Jan-19#23  TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR 
THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS 
The)
    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 23

    REAL TIME ANALYTICS & REPORTS FOR THE FLNG/FSRU MARKETS The LNG industry is going through a dramatic transformation. Our 2019 Annual Outlook and real-time FLNG/FSRU database is unique. It is not simply a static report, rather a dynamic and ever-changing database with a continuously updated wealth of

  • MR Jan-19#22  hires at future dates. The outlook can be 
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    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 22

    . Demand the worlds of shipping and ? nance can agree on prices variations around an economic trend line include nu- for tanker hires at future dates. The outlook can be merous wildcards. The actions of OPEC+ regarding described as cautiously optimistic but not ecstatic, The Forward Curve exports mentioned

  • MR Jan-19#20 The Tanker MarketThe Tanker Market
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    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    The Tanker MarketThe Tanker Market Outlook for Outlook for 2019 & Beyond2019 & Beyond Photo: Courtesy Euronav 20 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • JANUARY 2019 MR #1 (18-25).indd 20 MR #1 (18-25).indd 20 1/11/2019 1:16:07 PM1/11/2019 1:16:07 PM

  • MR Jan-19#2  SpaceX
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    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2

    / VOLUME 81 / JANUARY 2019 Features 14 “Go for Launch” USCG launches its ? rst two polar satellites. By Maura Casey Photo courtesy SpaceX 20 Tanker Outlook The tanker market ? nished 2018 strong. Will it continue? By Barry Parker Photo: Euronav 30 Fixing the Fleet Keeping USN ships running is personal to BAE