2008 Your Marine Technology

  • In a collective call to action for the decarbonization of shipping last year, 34 signatory CEOs from the industry made clear that efforts to significantly lower the carbon footprint of shipping presented “biggest technology challenge in the past 100 years”.

    This statement was not an exaggeration. In fact, the transition to a low-carbon future will take more than an unprecedented commitment to the research and development that traditionally underpins technological advance.  Finding complex solutions that are at once commercially viable, technically feasible, sustainable and safe will require a stable regulatory environment that provides long-term certainty for a wide range of investors in new low-carbon technologies.

    The IMO last year set an ambitious course with its preliminary greenhouse-gas (GHG) strategy, which was aimed at reducing CO2 emissions by at least 40% per cargo tonne-mile by 2030 (pursuing a 70% reduction by 2050) and a 50% reduction in GHG emissions by 2050 (against 2008 levels).
    According to the organization’s 3rd GHG study (2014), from 2007-2012 international shipping on average produced 2.6% of global CO2 emissions every year. Since then, consensus has formed that strong growth in demand for seaborne transport will see shipping’s carbon output grow faster than other major industries, if we continue business as usual.

    Shipowners have not been idle in the interim; significant reductions in fuel consumption have since come from improving vessel designs and operating methods. It will be difficult, however, to find further meaningful GHG gains by simply applying current technologies.
    The 2030 emissions targets are challenging. But because they are a measure of ‘carbon intensity’, they account for trade growth. Any efforts to meet those goals, however, will need to be aligned with the 2050 targets, if they are to account for the greater demand for transportation inherent in trade growth. This will require new technologies.

    A quick examination of some rough numbers helps to outline the size of the challenge. The IMO’s 3rd GHG study estimated that international shipping emitted 921 million tonnes of CO2 in 2008; by 2050, that volume could grow by as much as 250% to 2,300m tonnes, the IMO said.
    That means, to reduce CO2 output to 460m tonnes (and achieve the 2050 target), the global fleet would need to emit 1,840m fewer tonnes than in 2008, while having grown to serve a significant expansion in seaborne trade.

    Based on the historical average growth rate for maritime trade of 3.2% per year, the volume of seaborne trade could increase by 90% from 2030-2050; even using a conservative rate of 1.5%, the trade volumes would still grow 35%.

    Source: Clarksons

    From a carbon-intensity perspective, the IMO’s targets would require 2008’s benchmark of 22 grams of CO2 per tonne-mile to fall to 6.6g of CO2 per tonne-mile by 2050.

    It is a significant challenge, but here have been recent signs of progress. For example, mainly as a result of slow steaming in weak market conditions, in 2012, total CO2 emissions dropped to 796m tonnes, a 14% reduction relative to 2008; and an impressive 30% dip in carbon intensity was witnessed in 2015. However, since this was a result of commercial pressures, maintaining the reductions is not a given as market drivers can quickly change the paradigm and have vessels speed up to meet supply chain demands.

    It is results such as these which likely fuels the belief that 2030 emissions targets can be met with a combination of available technology, optimized vessel speeds, improvements in scheduling efficiency and limited use of low-carbon fuels. But, even then, the gap between 2030 emissions output and 2050 reduction targets will remain large.

    Assuming that operational and technical adjustments can suspend the growth in CO2 emissions until 2030, carbon output would still need to be reduced by 350m-tonne a year until 2050 to meet the IMO’s goals. That by itself will pose an enormous challenge, one that we presently have neither the new fuels nor the technologies to achieve.

    Improvements to the design of ships are required in the next phase of the IMO’s Energy Efficiency Design Index, but their contribution to GHG-reduction targets will be minimal. Further advances in ship technology could make another contribution, but new low- and zero-carbon energy sources still will be needed to reach the 2050 targets.

    Although many new energy sources and propulsion technologies are being tested, more development is required for most if they are to become viable for international shipping.

    Using digital technology to simplify shipping practices could further reduce fuel consumption and emissions by optimizing vessel speeds and routes, reducing waiting times and streamlining contractual transactions.

    Information-driven, just-in-time shipping, for example, could introduce slower speeds without regulations having to make them mandatory for everyone, regardless of shipment requirements. With improved vessel utilization, less additional capacity would be required. Likewise, digital technology and improved connectivity will support next level of performance optimization, preventative maintenance and matching ships to cargo.

    Understanding the impact and efficacy of technology options and their degrees of maturity will be critical for making investment decisions. And the readiness of some technologies will differ between shipping sectors; for example, some battery technologies may be available for vessels with short operating ranges, but not for the longer routes.

    In all probability, closing the emission gap between 2030 and 2050 will require a combination of measures. Among those, alternative fuels have most potential. But making them available for large-scale consumption will require the biggest investment.
    For the modern owner, setting the course to low-carbon shipping will require some skillful navigation.


    About the Author: Gurinder Singh is Director of Global Sustainability, at ABS. A full ABS report on pathways to low-carbon shipping can be found here.





  • and Cost-Effectiveness,” found the average Category 2 workboat remains in service for 50 years, instead of the 23-year lifespan estimated by the EPA in the 2008 Heavy Duty Locomotive and Marine Rule. A longer service life reduces the fleet’s turnover rate to cleaner, lower-emitting engines, therefore increasing

  • of Employees: 120 The Company: Elastec/American Marine manufactures and markets pollution control and oil spill response systems. The firm has ISO 9001:2008 certification and recently won an industry prize for their patented grooved disc oil skimming technology. They have also received international awards

  • Windwave Workboats will be the first customer of Damen’s Twin Axe Fast Crew Supplier (FCS) 2008. The Twin Axe FCS 2008 is a smaller version of Damen’s FCS 2610 which launched in 2011. Based in Penzance, Cornwall, Windwave Workboats has been providing offshore wind farm support and crew transfer services to

  • . With sophisticated lines of high performance connectors, custom cable assemblies, ABS PDA certified penetrators and lighting systems, BIRNS is an ISO 9001:2008 certified industry leader committed to a long legacy of developing new technology for highly competitive markets. The Company In 2014, BIRNS will

  • of inertial technologies for both onshore and offshore survey and navigation services. Since the development of its underwater metrology system C-PINS in 2008, it has completed a half century of metrologies. The Tech Zupt delivers operationally aware technologies to improve the productivity associated

  • , oil and gas, aerospace and medical markets. T.I. delivers supply chain solutions at all levels of sophistication and complexity. T.I. is ISO 9001:2008 & AS 9100 Rev. C registered. Its inventory is multi specification certified across industry standards and customer requirements. Its diversified inventory

  • now many end-users, rightfully so, are concerned about making wrong decisions and having to live with less than good results, says Mohn. From now until 2008, thousands of vessels with TBTbased antifoulings will drydock. The way these are handled, prior to application of new antifouling, will remain uncomplicat

  • 32, Jumeirah Lakes Towers, Dubai, United Arab Emirates +941 4 43 60 800 polarcus.com info@polarcus.com CEO: Rolf Rønningen   The Company Founded in 2008, Polarcus has the vision of delving into the depths of seismic activity while leaving the environment unharmed. The company has achieved this by employing

  • leader in specialty manufacturing of high pressure tube fitting gaskets, including its industry standard  SECO7 product line, Seco Seals is an ISO 9001:2008 and AS9100C certified gasket manufacturer who aims to put an end to leaks in most environments – from subsea to aerospace.   In its effort to remain

  • banning of the application of TBT-based products by January 1, 2003, and the banning of the presence of the TBT-based products on the hull by January 1, 2008. Circle 83 on Reader Service Car

  • for curved arrays, and reduced side lobes. MSI is in full scale production on a variety of commercial and industrial customers. MSI is ISO 9001:2008 certified. MSI’s piezocomposite arrays deliver broad bandwidth, enabling broad spectrum (chirp) and multi-frequency operating techniques which provide

  • MR Nov-19#96 MR NOV 2019_Index_revised2:Layout 1  11/7/2019  9:15 PM)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 96

    MR NOV 2019_Index_revised2:Layout 1 11/7/2019 9:15 PM Page 1 ADVERTISER INDEX Page#Advertiser Website Phone #Page#Advertiser Website Phone # 55Advanced Mechanical Enterprises .www.amesolutions.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(954) 764-2678 C3KE Marine / Worldwide Diesel . . . . .www.kemarine.com . .

  • MR Nov-19#93 MR
                                          Professional)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 93

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition ? Naval Architecture Services ? Marine Engineering s

  • MR Nov-19#90 This directory section is an editorial feature published)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 90

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Nov-19#88 ?|?| INTEGRATED MEDIA KIT         
When it comes to)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 88

    ?|?| INTEGRATED MEDIA KIT When it comes to Marine Marketing, One size does not?WDOO Monthly Network The Maritime Audience: 729,265 Source: Google Analytics Media Network ,W?VDELJLQGXVWU\DQG\RXUFOLHQWVRXUUHDGHUVKDYHVSHFL?FLQWHUHVWVZKHQLWFRPHV to their professions and their information needs.

  • MR Nov-19#84 P
PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY
timated 390 tons)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 84

    P PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY timated 390 tons and reach of more than optional 670 HP (500 kW) electric drive Sennebogen SENNEBOGEN will deliver the ? rst 130 feet, the 895 E is the largest material motor. It’s offered with a choice of three of its new 895 E Series model to North handler

  • MR Nov-19#83 ?
%RDW/,)(DGLYLVLRQRI/LIH,QGXVWULHV proud manufacturers of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    ? %RDW/,)(DGLYLVLRQRI/LIH,QGXVWULHV proud manufacturers of boat sealants, cleaners, compounds, waxes and epoxies, is now celebrating 60 years in the marine industry. With a longstanding reputation for quality, affordability, and trust, we are pleased to serve various marine industries on an ongoing basis.

  • MR Nov-19#82 P
PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY
Cimolai Technology)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 82

    P PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY Cimolai Technology Heavy Lift to Assist Shipbuilding Operations Images: Cimolai Technology imolai Technology Spa, the a span of 60 m and height of 60 m and Cimolai Technology Spa has been also lifting platform or used independently Italian company specialized

  • MR Nov-19#81 V
VESSELS 
and the 18th built as part of the teaming  USS)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 81

    V VESSELS and the 18th built as part of the teaming USS Delaware (BB 28), which was de- 2013. The submarine was christened by VLCC with New SOx agreement with General Dynamics Elec- livered by Newport News in 1910. Jill Biden, the former Second Lady of Scrubber Delivered tric Boat. More than 10

  • MR Nov-19#79 V
VESSELS 
45m Cat for AZAM
18 Meter Fire-Floats 
for)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 79

    V VESSELS 45m Cat for AZAM 18 Meter Fire-Floats for Bangladesh Robert Allan Ltd. has delivered a design of two unique ? re-? oats to Khulna Shipyard Ltd. in Bangladesh. The boats will measure 18.9 m x 5.3 m with a special hard chine semi-displacement hull designed for river service and ? tted with

  • MR Nov-19#78 V
VESSELS 
Sovcom?  ot Names New 
Seaspan Shipyard Delivers)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 78

    V VESSELS Sovcom? ot Names New Seaspan Shipyard Delivers OFSV Arctic Shuttle Tanker On October 6, 2019, a naming and ? ag raising ceremo- ny was held in Vladivostok for Sovcom? ot’s latest Arctic shuttle tanker. The vessel was named after Mikhail Laza- rev, a prominent Russian admiral and explorer

  • MR Nov-19#74 E
EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES
Schottel Propulsion for)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 74

    E EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES Schottel Propulsion for Emission-Free Push Boat The agreement between Wärtsilä and Norsepower will pro- mote the use of Rotor Sails & support sustainable shipping. Wärtsilä, Norsepower Sign Agreement The technology group Wärtsilä and Norsepower, a provider of low maintenance

  • MR Nov-19#73 E
EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS
the exhaust gases before)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 73

    E EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS the exhaust gases before they are dis- nance downtime, and offers numerous tractive capital and operational costs. offering exceptional ? exibility and the charged into the atmosphere, allowing a bene? ts including a customized ? exible The ENVI-Marine system really

  • MR Nov-19#72 E
EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS
Scrubbers: A 360-degree)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 72

    E EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS Scrubbers: A 360-degree solution for shipowners and the environment By Scott Poulter, founder and CEO, Paci? c Green Technologies s part of the IMO’s com- vessel to LNG would be prohibitively ies being built are super-modern and will The second compelling reason to in- mitme

  • MR Nov-19#71 S
SHIPMANAGEMENT FLAG
 “As a shipping company that is)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 71

    S SHIPMANAGEMENT FLAG “As a shipping company that is part of an oil company, our pri- mary role is managing marine risk, our secondary role is trans- porting oil.” Steve Herron, GM of Fleet Operations, Chevron Shipping Photo: Chevron and develop. A certain trust has devel- tal regulations adopted by the

  • MR Nov-19#70 S
SHIPMANAGEMENT FLAG
Chevron Shipping 
& Unlocking the)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    S SHIPMANAGEMENT FLAG Chevron Shipping & Unlocking the Value of Flag Photo: Chevron hoosing which Flag to register ment to ‘doing the right thing’. some commercial shipping companies’ to minimize risk requires partnering your ships with is not a deci- Herron has seen ? rst-hand how sail- choice of ?

  • MR Nov-19#68 VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE &)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE & COUNSEL, AMERICAN P&I CLUB Boriana enjoys giving back to the community which has sup- ported her throughout her ca- reer, pictured here with Martin Davies, the head of the Admiralty Law Center at her alma mater Tulane Law School, where she recently

  • MR Nov-19#67 VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE &)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 67

    VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE & COUNSEL, AMERICAN P&I CLUB SCI Mountain Challenge teammates (L to R): Boriana Farrar, Jeanne Grasso and Blythe Daly from WISTA USA. New Jersey chapter for ? ve years.” The more things change … While the progress has been steady, she still While this

  • MR Nov-19#65 VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE,)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 65

    VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE, LLOYD’S REGISTER what we believe will be prototype ves- LR research suggests that the cheap- as weather routing but these can only Digitalization has also enabled LR to sels, contracted and constructed in the est zero carbon fuels are going to be go

  • MR Nov-19#64 VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE,)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE, LLOYD’S REGISTER 5 minutes with LR’s Nick Brown By Greg Trauthwein “LR research suggests that the cheap- est zero carbon fuels are going to be at least double the price of fuels today.” Nick Brown, Lloyd’s Register Photo: Lloyd’s Register To kick things

  • MR Nov-19#63 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
for installation)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry.

  • MR Nov-19#62 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
14-meter leg extensions)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET 14-meter leg extensions to manage off- transport of higher and heavier turbine Delft Offshore Wind Turbine Concept tion between research partners TU Delft, shore sites with deeper water and higher components. (or DOT), in just one hour, using the ? rst TNO, Van

  • MR Nov-19#59 OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET
Brave Tern and Bold)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 59

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET Brave Tern and Bold Tern in port of Esbjerg Source: Fred. Olsen Windcarrier watt (MW) turbines could be available tractors and there are questions over neck in handling these large turbines You really need big machines, bigger in the timeframe of those projects.

  • MR Nov-19#55 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
states when the recipient)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING states when the recipient country cannot though not rati? ed by the requisite num- be required to have an initial survey to been uniquely tailored to the vessel. deal with the waste in line with the Con- ber of countries representing 40% of verify the inventory of

  • MR Nov-19#47 SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER
vessel to reach)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER vessel to reach the North Pole unaccom- transits to get on station and conduct Mardiros. The number one mission for panied—but it is designed primarily for operations with limited or no logistics the new PSC will be to carry out the an- Meet The “Fleet” scienti?