Aero

  • In February, shipbuilders and drill-rig manufacturers from several countries gathered at Vancouver Shipyards, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, to watch a 7,000,000-pound ship transferred to launching position on a film of water 5/1000 of an inch thick. It was the heaviest weight ever to be moved by the newly developed fluid-film method. A week later, the ferry was launched.

    The vessel is a trailer ferry, 457 feet long and 89 feet in beam, one of three of the same hull size constructed for the British Columbia Government Ferry System.

    The almost completed ferry weighed 3,500 tons when it slid along its smooth, level concrete pad to launching position. Pulling power was supplied by a converted log skidder exerting approximately 7,000 pounds of force or about one pound of force for every 1,000 pounds of ship's weight. So frictionless is this transfer system that precautions must be taken to hold ships' hulls against forces exerted by sudden gusts of wind.

    The transfer operation and the launching mark the culmination of a $4.5-million expansion program for Vancouver Shipyards from its planning stage in 1974.

    The yard's fluid-film transfer operation takes place on smooth concrete runways forming a grid in the construction area. The system recently developed by Aero-Go, Inc. of Seattle, Wash., is designed to move large units by use of a series of 40-ton-capacity, 4-footdiameter waterfilm bearings. The bearings are essentially inflatable " d o u g h n u t s " manufactured of flexible nylon-neoprene and hypalon materials. When inflated with water at a pressure of 50 pounds per square inch, each bearing lifts 40 tons. The total thrust exerted by all the bearings raises the load approximately two inches.

    At this point, water seeps from a contained supply in the center of the "doughnuts" onto the level concrete runway. The ship's hull, mounted in its wooden cradle, is now free-floating on a paper-thin film of water, and is ready to be transferred.

    The ferry hull was constructed in seven different sections or modules, each of which was transferred to join the others by means of the fluid film system.

    President of Vancouver Shipyards, Allen Fowlis, expressed satisfaction with the new shipyard arrangements: "The fluidfilm transfer system and our side-launching facility make it possible to compete effectively with shipbuilders anywhere in the Pacific Northwest," he said.

    "In two years we have doubled our shipbuilding facilities, as well as adding a capacity to build ships up to 500 feet in length and 100 feet in beam." He commented in particular on the flexibility of the construction system. "We have avoided committing ourselves to a more rigid system such as graving dock and end-launching facilities," Mr.

    Fowlis said. "What we have now is something close to an assemblyline system. We can build ships' modules under cover, move them into desired positions around one another, past one another, or joined to one another." He said that if supply problems delayed the construction of one vessel, it could be moved aside to make way for other construction.

    The resulting savings in time and money are substantial, and efficiency is substantially improved.

    The vessel is among the largest double-ended ferries in the world and is the largest vessel ever constructed by Vancouver Shipyards.

    Its engines develop 11,000 shp and will provide a service speed of 20 knots. It has a passenger capacity of 350 and can carry either 58 forty-foot trailers or 145 automobiles. Soon to be commissioned by the provincial government, the ferry will go into service between Vancouver and Vancouver Island.

    The Aero-Caster® System is the exclusive development of Aero-Go, Inc., 5800 Corson Avenue South, Seattle, Wash. 98108, with international sales of both water- and air-inflatable handling products. Floating heavy loads on fluid-film systems so nearly eliminates the friction under them that only a gentle one-pound push for every 1,000 pounds of load weight is needed to move them in any direction and speed desired.

    To move varying section sizes and weights, the proper number of Aero-Casters are used. They are positioned under loads in rectangular arrangements for load balancing. The lift capacity of a fluid-film system is unlimited.

    Flow control valves at each Aero- Caster automatically gage the water flow needed by the caster to lift the load weight above it.

    Once the Aero-Casters are in position, there is no need to manually adjust pressures to move a hull unit as its weight changes during completion.

    Todd Shipyards Corporation's Seattle yard was the first shipyard in the world to use an Aero- Caster transfer system to build vessels in the 1,000-ton range.

    Their Aero-Caster system provides the capability of easily transferring ship subassemblies from rail and wheel bogies onto waterfilm. It also includes a waterfilm turntable for 90-degree rotation of ship assemblies weighing up to 500 tons. Todd has had as many as four 228-foot-long by 44-foot-wide ships side-by-side at one time parallel to their sidelaunchways moved into position on waterfilm.

    Since December 1974, Brown & Root, Inc. in Houston, Texas, has been using an Aero-Go waterfilm pallet system to move offshore oil-drilling platform decks. Weighing up to 2,000 tons, steel decks are floated from inside their fabrication building on air film and throughout their outside yard and onto barges on waterfilm. Move distance is approximately 500 feet. Deck sizes are typically 60 feet high by 72 feet wide by 163 feet long. Two fluid-film pallets are inserted in recessed feet under each of the deck's eight columnar legs.

    Several foreign yards are using Aero-Go systems to move heavy equipment within shops and to position engines. At Sasebo Heavy Industries, Japan, Aero-Casters are inverted atop pedestals to float steel deck-plate assemblies above them to join them for welding. Aboard ship, air film is used to install prefabricated cabins and auxiliary equipment.

    Aero-Go introduced the Aero- Caster air-film device in 1967 and the waterfilm Aero-Caster in 1971.

    Systems are now in use in hundreds of diverse industries worldwide, ranging from total in-plant air-film production-conveying lines to the shock-free movement of 1,000-pound sensitive electronics.

  • American Aero, Inc. of Houston, a subsidiary of Weatherford I n t e r n a t i o n a l , has promoted Dwight Toney to sales and operations manager for its Marine Crane Division. He will be responsible for both domestic and international sales involving the firm's varied line of hydraulic marine

  • American Aero, Inc., a subsidiary of Weatherford International, will more than double its current production capacity by building a new manufacturing plant, warehouse, and office complex in northwest Houston. The AAI plant proposal, more than a year in the planning stages, was approved by Weatherford

  • IDB Aero-Nautical Communications, Inc. (IDB-A), Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., a supplier of maritime communication services via satellite, recently acquired Ft. Lauderdale-based Ocean Satellite Television, Inc. (OceanSat), a supplier of satellite news services to the pleasure cruise industry. Under the terms

  • reportedly successfully run for the first time at the company's Bristol, UK site. "This is a great milestone in our drive to bring leading edge, proven, aero gas turbine technology to the marine marketplace," said Saul Lanyado, president, Rolls-Royce Marine. Planned for availability early in 2004, the

  • is stimulating fresh interest within a conservative shipping industry in gas turbine-based solutions. Building on the company's huge investments in aero engine technology over the past decade, the MT30 gas turbine has been specifically prepared for shipboard applications, combining power density

  • the 95,000 DWT bulk carrier, Raga at its Marugame Shipyard. The bulk carrier is unique in that it has adopted a next-generation superstructure called the Aero-Citadel, which according to the shipyard offers significant advantages in both air resistance and antipiracy measures. The Aero-Citadel has slimly

  • Ocean Aero is a small, new San Diego-based unmanned maritime systems company that has big plans to provide both a product and service to solve a very difficult problem – ocean observation.  “Ocean observation is being able to monitor or sense the environment above, on-top and below the surface of the

  • Vericor Power Systems LLC remains a leading supplier of integrated aeroderivative gas turbine propulsion systems for commercial and military customers worldwide. This joint company of Honeywell International, Inc. and MTU Aero Engines GmbH offers commercial ship operators and navies alike its TF series

  • , the barge was moved from its building berth across to the launch sleds for side launching, using water bearings or "casters" supplied by Aero-Go, Inc., of Seattle, Wash. The launch weight of the Seaspan Rigger was 3,000 tons. Water bearings are basically the same design as the air bearings

  • 570 feet) for ships up to 30,000 dwt. Prior to joining Hydranautics Hydraulic Systems, Mr. Johnson was responsible for program and schedule control for Aero Spacelines, Inc. His experience also includes being on the aerodynamics staff involved with wind tunnel work for Boeing

  • IDB Aero*Nautical Communications, Inc. (IDB-A), a supplier of mobile communications services via Inmarsat satellite to the maritime industry, has signed a contract with Cruisephone, Ltd., a leading supplier of cellular telecommunications to the cruise industry, for the exclusive provision of services

  • MT May-19#64  Website Phone#
41 . . . . .Aero Tec Laboratories, Inc )
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 64

    Index page MTR MAY19:MTR Layouts 4/26/2019 12:22 PM Page 1 Advertiser Index PageCompany Website Phone# 41 . . . . .Aero Tec Laboratories, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.atlinc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(800) 526-5330 19 . . . . .Airmar Technology

  • MR May-19#64 . If  do make mistakes. The aero industry has 
dustries)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    and humans erlands Maritime Technology Joint In- of autonomous vessels? Once a vessel is lot systems offer the same reliability. If do make mistakes. The aero industry has dustries Project. The live test on board clear of port and on the high seas can the autonomous ships are to become more had it’s fair

  • MR Oct-18#92  and overhauls (MRO) for large aero-derivative industrial 
400)
    October 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 92

    .com Advanced Chemical training (an asset) Manager to manage Gas Turbine maintenance, repair Work Phone : 757-545-2414 SSO and overhauls (MRO) for large aero-derivative industrial 400 East Indian River Road Norfolk, VA, 23523 United ECDIS and marine gas turbine engines. This position is located States

  • MR Sep-18#47  used and being developed for aero-
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ters in Science,)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    and techniques Center, 256-544-5226. Ohio State University 1986, and a Mas- and inspection costs signi? cantly. The are used and being developed for aero- 1 ters in Science, University of Tennessee new designs would allow the use of new space applications in the U.S. aerospace The FSW process was

  • MT Jun-18#17  to do similar things across aero- landings, hydrographic)
    June 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 17

    projects that are happening through We have people looking at tendering for offshore wind, boat Invest in Cornwall that look to do similar things across aero- landings, hydrographic survey solutions and autonomous space, health, agriculture and space. Marine-i is focusing on vessels. the marine technology

  • MP Q1-18#58  needs for the maritime and aero industries. 
nology to)
    Jan/Feb 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 58

    Information Technology, with a focus on the unique ship crews are becoming increasingly reliant on digital tech- connectivity needs for the maritime and aero industries. nology to ful? ll their roles. Connectivity that delivers access to Before joining SES Networks, Gregory was Director of IT Operations

  • MP Q1-18#4  communications at Florida  and aero industries. Before joining)
    Jan/Feb 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    Magazine and has served as on the unique connectivity needs for the maritime VP Sales Rob Howard an adjunct professor of communications at Florida and aero industries. Before joining SES Networks, howard@marinelink.com International University. Eyerdam graduated from Gregory was Director of IT Operations

  • MR Feb-18#2nd Cover  Terminal, Hong Kong
Bernù Aero Seating
Arconas specializes)
    February 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2nd Cover

    Comfortable Passengers are Satisfed Customers. Kai Tak Cruise Terminal, Hong Kong Bernù Aero Seating Arconas specializes in the development of seating, power, and waste solutions for public spaces such as cruise and ferry terminals. Our team understands the unique needs of high-traffc and high-salinity

  • MN Dec-17#19  including automotive, aero-
space, and certainly marine)
    December 2017 - Marine News page: 19

    will be a very signi? cant path forward. Battery technology will con- tinue to drive progress in a number of industries including automotive, aero- space, and certainly marine. We are already seeing hybrid projects ranging from research vessel and coastal ship- ping newbuilds in the United States

  • MR Oct-17#34  Terminal, Hong Kong
Bernù Aero Seating
Arconas specializes)
    October 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    Comfortable Passengers are Satisfed Customers. Kai Tak Cruise Terminal, Hong Kong Bernù Aero Seating Arconas specializes in the development of seating, power, and waste solutions for public spaces such as cruise and ferry terminals. Our team understands the unique needs of high-traffc and high-salinity

  • MT Sep-17#61    603  www.aoos.org Ocean Aero Inc  809  www.oceanaero)
    September 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 61

    Booth Website www.nortekgroup.com Aanderaa - Xylem 309, 311 www.xyleminc.com Nortek 302 Alaska Ocean Observing System 603 www.aoos.org Ocean Aero Inc 809 www.oceanaero.us ALSEAMAR 407 www.alseamar-alcen.com Ocean Networks Canada 821 www.oceannetworks.ca American Marine International 606

  • MT Jul-17#39 Image: Ocean Aero
Over the last year Ocean Aero has been)
    July 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 39

    Image: Ocean Aero Over the last year Ocean Aero has been extremely successful “ in two U.S. Department of Defense sponsored exercises. In 2016, the Submaran was the critical node in relaying instruc- “Snake-like vehicle Eelume” tions from a shore base ground control station to the Lockheed Kongsberg

  • MT Jul-17#38  ... one of a kind”
Ocean Aero
Ocean Aero is a San Diego)
    July 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 38

    ? ow cell lifespan and beyond its technological abilities is the range of ground- streamlined operations.” “ “The Submaran ... one of a kind” Ocean Aero Ocean Aero is a San Diego based company focused on accelerating discovery of our world’s oceans. The award- winning Submaran is the product behind

  • MT Jul-17#31   www.?  uidimaging.com
38 Ocean Aero  www.oceanaero.us 
 “The)
    July 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 31

    www.deeptrekker.com “Submersible, Magnetic Robot for Hull Inspection” 38 Fluid Imaging Technologies “Meet the FlowCam” www.? uidimaging.com 38 Ocean Aero www.oceanaero.us “The Submaran ... One of a Kind” 39 Kongsberg Maritime http://km.kongsberg.com “Snake-like Vehicle Eelume” 42 Impact Subsea www

  • MT Jul-17#2 .........................7 Ocean Aero Submaran .............)
    July 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 2

    Inc. ............................................................ Blue Robotics Inc. ............................................................7 Ocean Aero Submaran ..................................................38Ocean Aero Submaran ..................................................38 Blueye Robotics

  • MR Jul-17#11  in the connected and autono-
aero and connected-transportation)
    July 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 11

    solutions for the maritime, as increased access to training and en- erations, navigation and onshore moni- advances in the connected and autono- aero and connected-transportation hanced crew services. Improved com- toring as they cross the world’s oceans. mous systems that require secure ship- markets

  • MR Jul-17#5  the Naval  Pakkanen  maritime, aero and connect-
Dennis L.)
    July 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 5

    P a a s s c c h h o o a a Pakkanen Rasmussen Goldberg Haun Hansen Bryant Bryant Goldberg SCUBA diver at the Naval Pakkanen maritime, aero and connect- Dennis L. Bryant is with Murray Goldberg is CEO of Undersea Warfare Center, Pekka Pakkanen holds the ed-transportation markets. Maritime

  • MR Apr-17#57   in Evendale, Ohio; Avio Aero will 
miles to New York)
    April 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    of the GE Store: the from Horizon on March 21 and will LM2500+G4 gas turbines will be built travel approximately 1,700 nautical in Evendale, Ohio; Avio Aero will miles to New York City. The second manufacture the LM2500+G4 turbine ferry (H201) is scheduled to depart control system at its facility in

  • MR Apr-17#47 , Daniel Barcarolo, PhD, Senior 
Aero & Hydrodynamic and Project)
    April 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    were Alain Ledoux, naval architect at Total S.A., Olivier Langeard, proj- ect engineer at DORIS Engineer- ing, Daniel Barcarolo, PhD, Senior Aero & Hydrodynamic and Project engineer at HydrOcean, Graham Knapp R&D engineer at CSTB, Benjamin Rousse Chief Scientist at Océanide and Olivier Bachman

  • MR Apr-17#44  DORIS Engineering, numerical aero and 
Cstructure of the)
    April 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    engineering ? rm loads acting on the mooring of the structure, and can be sig- and re? ned through expensive, labor-in- DORIS Engineering, numerical aero and Cstructure of the platform ni? cant in speci? c ocean areas. Because tensive fabrication and testing of physi- hydrodynamics specialist HydrOcean

  • MT Mar-17#26  familiar to users of military/aero- a bare ? ber cleaved tip)
    March 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 26

    . close to each other as possible. In another interesting connectivity technology development, Drymate connectors are familiar to users of military/aero- a bare ? ber cleaved tip has been repackaged into a downhole space circular connectors. FO drymate connectors can be in- wetmate connector. This epoxy-free

  • MR Feb-16#46 , wireless infrastructure, aero- tions such as enterprise)
    February 2016 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    and tions including the Internet of Things, operators, and broadband for applica- Ku-band to North and Latin America enterprise, wireless infrastructure, aero- tions such as enterprise, aeronautical and the North Atlantic region. Intelsat nautical and maritime mobility, and and maritime mobility, and government

  • MR May-16#55 . However, 
the fuel for aero-derivative gas turbines)
    May 2016 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    FRYHUVVDIHW\LQVWDOODWLRQVRQERDUGVKLSVDQGYHVVHOVDVZHOODV SHUVRQDOVDIHW\02% sity propulsion technology. However, the fuel for aero-derivative gas turbines Welcome to learn more at cmhammar.com is expensive when compared to conven- tional marine fuels and gas turbines ther- www

  • MN Nov-16#71  bring lessons 
learned from the aero side of the business onto)
    November 2016 - Marine News page: 71

    appear to be willing to pay for.” T H EECHNOLOGY AND THE UMAN LEMENT There are, says McFadyen, other ways to bring lessons learned from the aero side of the business onto the water- front. “We’re not that far behind in terms of the technol- ogy. In terms of the acceptance of operators, we are