One Technology

  • That ‘Cloud’ on the horizon is closer than it looks.

    The container shipping industry faces many challenges, particularly when it comes to increasing uncertainty in the global political and economic environment. The issues between the US and China over trade relations and Brexit in Europe are testing the industry, plus increased regulations and market fluctuations are having a big impact.

    How container shipping companies operate now and in the future is changing and staying ahead of the curve is crucial for survival. Predictions suggest there will be far less container shipping in the future as the trend for consolidation continues. Smaller operators are being pushed out as larger global carriers take over. Last year it was suggested that the 10 largest operators control 60-70% of the global capacity.

    Further consolidations are expected in 2019. The trend towards more goods being bought and produced locally, rather than coming from China, means there is likely to be far less container shipping needed in the future. Technologies such as 3D printing are also having an effect as they enable companies, for example engine manufacturers, to produce engines locally rather than shipping them from elsewhere.

    As a result container shipping companies need to look at innovative ways to become more efficient and streamline their operations to remain competitive. With 90% of all cargo being delivered across the oceans, technology has a vital role to play in connecting vessels and office teams. Technology can help cut costs and facilitate process optimization and is something companies should embrace.

    The Future of Shipping Technology
    Technology is reshaping the container shipping business, helping to improve efficiency and streamline processes. One of the hot topics just now is ‘smart shipping’ – highly automated or autonomous vessels. The Clyde Co and IMareEST Technology in Shipping Report found that most respondents forecast the introduction of smart shipping in the next 10 to 15 years.

    Companies such as Rolls-Royce even suggest autonomous shipping is the future of the maritime industry. They say it’s as disruptive as the smartphone and the smart ship will revolutionize the landscape of ship design and operations. And yet, some though are taking a ‘wait and see’ approach when it comes to adopting smart shipping technologies and it could be some years before the true impact of this on the container shipping industry is known.

    On the other hand, while the industry has been described by some as operating in the “stone age,” there are signs this is changing as cargo companies look to other industries for inspiration. One technology in particular that has had a big impact on business in the past ten years and is now causing big waves in the container shipping industry is the Cloud.

    The cloud facilitates the access of business data and applications from anywhere at any time and with any mobile device. Investing in cloud technology is improving collaboration between teams on shore and at sea and creating a connected workplace culture that supports strategic business goals. Increasingly, container shipping companies are recognizing this can bring tremendous benefits to their operations.

    One of the main advantages for companies who are technology wary because of the perceived costs and lack of knowledge within their crews is that cloud software doesn’t require big expense on new infrastructure. It’s straightforward and easy to implement, plus staff don’t need to have advanced IT skills as shipping cloud software is intuitive and requires minimal training.

    The recent Technology in Shipping Report highlighted that the skill set and competencies of crew to use new technologies was a concern when it came to smart shipping. This has also been a concern with the cloud and some companies have been hesitant to implement it. It’s true to say that companies willing to adapt their processes and procedures, hire tech-savvy staff and take advantage of technology to change the way they work, will benefit the most. However, the lack of technology skills needn’t be a barrier for companies looking to streamline operations through the cloud.

    How the cloud is changing operations
    A report by the Seafarers International Research Centre found that at least a part of the effective operation of a modern vessel is determined by the quality of the relationships between shoreside personnel and sea staff. The report recommended companies take steps to address the gulf between ship and shore personnel in order to improve ship-shore relations.

    Cloud-based software is enabling companies to do just this and optimize the management of their entire fleet, automate their processes, improve their communications, increase their business performance, improve operational efficiencies and drive down costs. A major benefit is the improved communication between staff on board ships and those in head office. Whether that’s crew planning, the execution of payroll or the evaluation of seamen, digital data is always up-to-date and available where it is needed.

    Without the cloud, it would be difficult for crews, head office teams and other parties to keep up to date with processes and other management and administrative issues, making companies less agile and able to deal with issues immediately. In today’s fast-paced business world, this is a definite disadvantage.

    Cloud solutions also enable companies to reduce overheads by having smaller offices around the world instead of one large office. For instance, instead of sending employees to travel across the world to carry out jobs such as on-board inspections, having a cloud solution means ships can hire external personnel locally who can log in, carry out jobs and send the results direct to those that need it.

    A major challenge for container companies currently is the integration of systems and processes from different departments to a central data source. The same information might get requested several times from the captain, which forces him to respond manually to each request.

    As to tasks being carried out by both land and sea teams, a lack of integration has previously meant less transparency across the business. The cloud is resolving this. It’s enabling information to be centralized in one place and made accessible no matter where staff is based. It is ensuring that systems and processes are integrated and data silos removed – allowing operators to gain a complete 360-degree overview of their fleet and entire operations.

    Most importantly the cloud is changing how information is exchanged and accessed. There is no more need to send emails back and forth, requesting or forwarding information. Data that is entered at one end is automatically available to everybody else using a cloud-based solution. Information is available in real-time regardless of time or location, reducing time spent on administration.

    This is a big change for an industry that still uses a lot of clipboards to take down information and manually transfer to Excel to send on to ship managers. Collecting data for instance on board this way is very ‘admin’ heavy but the cloud enables this to be done using mobile technology which can then be accessed anywhere in the world.

    Often data and documents are saved on multiple servers too that are not connected to vessels, so there are difficulties accessing and finding relevant documents. With the cloud all vessels and shore teams are connected so information can be easily filed and accessed by the entire company.

    The cloud is also helping automate and improve tasks such as purchasing and stock planning, as well as complying with regulations such as keeping track of waste, sewage and sludge disposal. Even staff wellbeing can be addressed using cloud applications, as crew shifts and rest periods can be tracked to ensure companies comply with industry guidelines and standards.

    A key benefit of using cloud applications is that they are constantly updated and improved as new technologies become available. These updates are automatically installed with no need for manual effort and can help container shipping companies’ future proof their business.
    With the container shipping industry becoming increasingly competitive, it is imperative that companies innovate now to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. Adopting the cloud is one way to do this.

    Cloud platforms are increasingly affordable and accessible and enable companies to implement smarter, faster and more effective processes to streamline their operations and remain competitive. The cloud is changing the way container companies work and is one technology that any company with an eye on the future needs to embrace.

    After graduating with a degree in Business Informatics, Alexander Buchmann worked for software company Trigonon at the Hansa Treuhand, where he first gained an insight into the internal processes of shipping companies.He founded Hanseaticsoft in 2009 and developed Cloud Fleet Manager. Today Hanseaticsoft has more than 30 employees and develops software solutions for shipping companies. Since March 2017, Lloyd's Register as held a share in the software company.

    This article first appeared in the MARCH/APRIL edition of Maritime Logistics Professional magazine.

  • close to your customer and understand what is driving them, and you’ve got to understand your craft, today and tomorrow. If you had to identify the one technology that has most enabled efficiencies in your business, what would that one technology be?     Our ability to process data has become both our greatest

  • is helping to change the way the maritime industry looks at ‘rope.’ It hasn’t been too long since industry icon Tom Crowley, Jr. offered that the one technology that had the biggest impact on the safety and efficiency of [his company’s] maritime operations was, in a word: ROPE. The reasoning was simple

  • felt we could improve and position our fleet to better serve our existing customers, as well as new customers.   In your career, can you point to the one technology that has helped to make your operations more safe and efficient?  The one technology that has benefitted not only our operations, but the entire

  • will continue to be, DOE’s primary market. By world region, Asia, with its seemingly boundless infrastructure growth, presents oportunities What ONE technology has had the greatest impact on DOE’s ability to provided engineered solutions to the subsea market? Bergman: If I had to pick one technology

  • of our guests have never cruised before. So we are attracting new people to the all things Crystal experience.   Technology: If you could name the one technology that has most significantly transformed the cruising experience, what would it be? WiFi, because people cannot not be connected at sea. We had

  • . It is equally important for leaders to be accountable for the systems that their people work under. In your career, if you could point to one technology that has best enabled the efficient, safe operation of ships at sea, what would that one technology be, and why? So much has changed over the

  • have the expertise to do these calculations, and help the owner and the shipyard understand which are the best options. That is our job.   Is there one technology that you see taking the lead, looking at 2020? If I look at our reference list, those with SCR and those with EGR, it is roughly 50/50 right now

  • a high level of expert craftsmanship, and now it benefits from virtual tools, augmented reality, robotics, and advanced manufacturing technology.What one technology do you believe made the process of shipbuilding more efficient?From my experience, the 3D product model has been transformational in ship design

  • subcontracted diving and marine environmental services, and into a more prime position with end users and facility owners. What do you count as the one technology that has had the greatest impact in terms of making your business safer and more efficient?     I do not necessarily have a great perspective

  • scale and better capacity factors, we believe the cost curve for floating wind will see the same development as the cost curve for fixed bottom.What ONE technology do you see as having the biggest impact on making offshore wind a more efficient and cost-effective solution.  Why?The obvious one short term:

  • program instruction.   Marine Salvage is an intriguing business, literally an engineered solution as no two wrecks are the same. In your career, what one technology do you count as having the greatest impact on allowing salvage to be conducted more efficiently and safely? Unequivocally, it’s the improvements

  • MR Nov-19#96  INDEX
Page#Advertiser Website Phone #Page#Advertiser Website)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 96

    MR NOV 2019_Index_revised2:Layout 1 11/7/2019 9:15 PM Page 1 ADVERTISER INDEX Page#Advertiser Website Phone #Page#Advertiser Website Phone # 55Advanced Mechanical Enterprises .www.amesolutions.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(954) 764-2678 C3KE Marine / Worldwide Diesel . . . . .www.kemarine.com . .

  • MR Nov-19#93 MR
                                          Professional)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 93

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition ? Naval Architecture Services ? Marine Engineering s

  • MR Nov-19#90  is provided, at no cost for one year in all issues, only)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 90

    the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and ser- vices. A listing is provided, at no cost for one year in all issues, only to companies with continuing advertising programs in this publication, whether an advertise- BUYER’S DIRECTORY ment appears

  • MR Nov-19#88  it comes to 
Marine Marketing, 
One size does not?WDOO
Monthly)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 88

    ?|?| INTEGRATED MEDIA KIT When it comes to Marine Marketing, One size does not?WDOO Monthly Network The Maritime Audience: 729,265 Source: Google Analytics Media Network ,W?VDELJLQGXVWU\DQG\RXUFOLHQWVRXUUHDGHUVKDYHVSHFL?FLQWHUHVWVZKHQLWFRPHV to their professions and their information needs.

  • MR Nov-19#83  As most tech developments, this one was envisioned to solve)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    when escorting large ships from the port through a narrow channel into diamond shaft carriage under extreme the open sea.” As most tech developments, this one was envisioned to solve a loads to rotate and slide to an unloaded problem, speci? cally to keep very large bulk carriers on their line when transit- posi

  • MR Nov-19#82 P
PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY
Cimolai Technology)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 82

    P PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY Cimolai Technology Heavy Lift to Assist Shipbuilding Operations Images: Cimolai Technology imolai Technology Spa, the a span of 60 m and height of 60 m and Cimolai Technology Spa has been also lifting platform or used independently Italian company specialized

  • MR Nov-19#77  and data 
security is just one more layer – and a 
frequently)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 77

    the collection and processing of personal information from individuals who live in the European Union (EU). GDPR compliance and data security is just one more layer – and a frequently neglected aspect – of the mul- tinational healthcare dilemma facing the ? ag of convenience operator. The answer can

  • MR Nov-19#76  globe. The remote character  one way to mitigate most of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 76

    avoidable. Engaging a case manager is operator. That’s because on board medi- jump,’ but under AP companies’ proto- across the globe. The remote character one way to mitigate most of that risk. cal emergencies, in particular those con- col, shortcuts are not allowed under any of that working environment de

  • MR Nov-19#74 E
EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES
Schottel Propulsion for)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 74

    E EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES Schottel Propulsion for Emission-Free Push Boat The agreement between Wärtsilä and Norsepower will pro- mote the use of Rotor Sails & support sustainable shipping. Wärtsilä, Norsepower Sign Agreement The technology group Wärtsilä and Norsepower, a provider of low maintenance

  • MR Nov-19#73 E
EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS
the exhaust gases before)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 73

    E EMISSION REDUCTION SCRUBBERS the exhaust gases before they are dis- nance downtime, and offers numerous tractive capital and operational costs. offering exceptional ? exibility and the charged into the atmosphere, allowing a bene? ts including a customized ? exible The ENVI-Marine system really

  • MR Nov-19#72  does entail an investment, it’s one that  re?  neries around)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 72

    term, because there are 700 established over 10 years ago as the world’s ? rst This is a major transition for ship op- does entail an investment, it’s one that re? neries around the world, and the mainstream green vehicle, the Toyota erators and owners, but they have sev- will pay for itself within

  • MR Nov-19#71  
than happy to pick up the phone and get  At present, Chevron)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 71

    is “more drive the development of technology.” ing the 2020 commitment to lower sul- of these regulations from the perspective than happy to pick up the phone and get At present, Chevron is in the process fur fuel oil and the broader greenhouse of a ship owner, but also drive progress in touch with someone

  • MR Nov-19#70  in a responsible way. It’s one thing 
eral Manager of)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    Chevron Shipping Company’s Gen- for ? nancial reasons can be a mistake. risk, commercial risk, and perhaps most issues in a responsible way. It’s one thing eral Manager of Fleet Operations, Steve Herron – who hails from Scotland - start- importantly, reputational risk. to say they’re business friendly

  • MR Nov-19#68 , it an issue that everyone is fo- ber of early adopters)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    a fairly limited and exclusive num- the industry to adjust. “The insurance in- that her organization grows in step with installed, it an issue that everyone is fo- ber of early adopters, there is a growing dustry is a well-oiled machine, and it is an ever-changing industry. “I love being cused on.” reference

  • MR Nov-19#66  with a law ?  rm  perhaps one organization that has stood)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 66

    maritime commu- wanted to be an international commercial nity outside the walls of her ‘9 to 5’, and lawyer, but as an intern with a law ? rm perhaps one organization that has stood out (Sher Garner) in New Orleans I started has been her connection with WISTA, the working on maritime cases. I found

  • MR Nov-19#65  ‘reality on the 
sion vessels, one that doesn’t penalize 
street’)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 65

    conduct their business at sea. exists in the transition to zero-emis- would have been required. To start, what is the ‘reality on the sion vessels, one that doesn’t penalize street’? How is LR bene? ting from digitaliza- ? rst movers - and enables the industry Digitalization is primarily driven

  • MR Nov-19#64  which you 
combining to drive one of the largest 
vest in)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    and decarbonization sector, and therefore we decided to in- information from sensors, control pacted LR and the way in which you combining to drive one of the largest vest in Nettitude in 2018 and bring in systems and maintenance logs can be go about your business? periods of change that the maritime

  • MR Nov-19#63  jacks which 
are reused to lift one tower level after 
the)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    , and then towed to the installation site where, after ballasting the GBS to the seabed, con- ventional heavy-lift strand jacks which are reused to lift one tower level after the other, lifting two sections weighing a total 960-tonne into their ? nal positions. The recoverable jacks that lift each level

  • MR Nov-19#62  deeper water and higher  components.  (or DOT), in just)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    of higher and heavier turbine Delft Offshore Wind Turbine Concept tion between research partners TU Delft, shore sites with deeper water and higher components. (or DOT), in just one hour, using the ? rst TNO, Van Oord and Sif group, and proj- survival storms, such as the North Sea We also asked Seaway

  • MR Nov-19#60 ? rm. “They can lift all the components 
turbines; longer blades)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    FLEET key dimensions when installing larger to retro? t a crane, and it really is a head- Some are investing. ? rm. “They can lift all the components turbines; longer blades and heavier na- ache for wind turbine installation vessels Just four years into entering the off- up to the actual max

  • MR Nov-19#57  evolve…”.
sets do not end up at one of these no- worlds will)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    their legacy as- interview noting, “companies in third them business. At some point in the de- process…That’s how you evolve…”. sets do not end up at one of these no- worlds will make investments if it will velopment you have to test a yard with Right: Grieg Green inspectors witness- ing the proper

  • MR Nov-19#56  yards have Hong Kong con- was done in the right way and that)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    … The main goal for us is that it For recycling a speci? c ship or rig you to [the management and workers at the …Many yards have Hong Kong con- was done in the right way and that it can have to make a Ship Recycling Plan, Ship Recycling Facility] and look at vention compliance certi? cates, but the

  • MR Nov-19#54  a ?  ag of conve-
breaking as one of the deadliest  pressure)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    where they listed ship- when it comes to ship recycling. This of Non-Governmental Organizations tions such as shifting to a ? ag of conve- breaking as one of the deadliest pressure has created an interesting mar- (NGO) have sprung up to help “clean nience. According to NGO Shipbreaking professions in

  • MR Nov-19#47  conduct  Mardiros. The number one mission for 
panied—but)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    SHIPBUILDING USCG POLAR SECURITY CUTTER vessel to reach the North Pole unaccom- transits to get on station and conduct Mardiros. The number one mission for panied—but it is designed primarily for operations with limited or no logistics the new PSC will be to carry out the an- Meet The “Fleet” scienti?