Participating Ocean Technology

  • BlueTech Week 2017 aims to bring together industry, academia and government in sunny southern California. Now in its ninth year, the annual event has grown to encompass seven events in five days, scheduled for November 6-10, 2017. MTR caught up with Michael Jones, president of The Maritime Alliance (TMA), to discuss ‘what’s new’ at this year’s event.

     
    How has BlueTech Week evolved over the years, and in what ways has it stayed the same?
    The basic concepts are the same – to “Promote BlueTech & Blue Jobs”, foster collaboration and international outreach. But there have been amazing developments over the years. As examples, we have grown from two events over two days to seven events over five days of BlueTech Week 2017 with a theme of “Smart Ocean, Smart Water.” Attendance over the week has expanded from probably 100 in the first year to an expected 450 across the multiple events this year. Second, we became a membership organization in late 2013 and over the last four years have added over 80 corporate members starting in San Diego and increasingly across the U.S. and international with members in Brazil, Canada, Italy, Mexico, Norway, South Africa and the U.K., which means more members participate from around the world. Third, two years ago in 2015 we added a BlueTech Cluster Convening and had eight clusters from five countries participate sharing best practices and exploring ways to collaborate. For the third annual Cluster Convening this year, we expect 17-18 clusters and clusters-in-formation related to ocean and water technologies from at least eight countries and nine U.S. states to participate in the “by invitation” day. Fourth, there is not enough financing available to innovative SMEs, so last year we launched a BlueTech PitchFest day, which returns in 2017 with more presenting companies and more investors and channel partners expected. And finally, while TMA is best known for our ocean tech work, we are a cluster that covers both fresh and salt water. This year, for the first time, we are running multiple tracks for ocean and water technology providers and users – our member companies sell across both domains – including a dedicated water track with six panels. We will also have water clusters with us for the first time. 
     
    What makes BlueTech Week stand out from other conferences dedicated to the ocean science and marine technology communities?
    TMA is a networking organization and everything that takes place during BlueTech Week relates to creating relationships between clusters and companies. BlueTech Week is not a trade show – there are great trade shows around the world that put technology and service companies in front of buyers. Our mission statement is “Promoting Sustainable, Science-Based Ocean & Water Industries” and our tag line is “Promoting BlueTech & Blue Jobs”, so everything we do is designed to promote those goals. We create an intimate, networking environment with high level attendees from academia, industry and policy that results in academic and channel partnerships, funding opportunities, technology partnerships, workforce development and more during BlueTech Week. We like to say, “the right people, the right place, the right setting, the right time”…and San Diego is always a great place to visit, especially when it is winter in northern Europe.
     
    Looking at the busy year that The Maritime Alliance has had so far, what are one or two highlights you most excited about?
    Let me mention three. First, we have a growing number of examples of partnerships among TMA members internationally and with companies of our cluster partners – collaboration works. Second, our engagement with educational institutions and workforce development is critical. We care about developing the technical staff needed by our member companies and to inspire the entrepreneurial leaders of tomorrow. As two examples, we have recently begun working with the San Diego Unified School District – one of the largest school districts the U.S. – to create a Blue Economy Academy and workforce pathway…and, with some grant funding organized by one of our educational partners, we will launch a Blue Jobs website with career videos to inform and excite youth (and their parents) about the broad array of jobs in the fast-growing Blue Economy. And third, we are very excited to be working with a growing number of clusters and clusters in formation around the world to create win-win situations across the Triple Helix (academia, industry and policy makers) that will result in more Blue Job growth in sustainable, science-based ocean and water industries. 
     
    Please provide an update on The Maritime Alliance’s efforts to engage with other similar clusters around the globe, as well as a look at plans for the next 12-18 months ahead.
    In January 2017, TMA helped launch the BlueTech Cluster Alliance (BTCA), which is an association of nine of the leading BlueTech clusters in the world committed to collaborate. Most of us already have a history of working together and we are looking at ways to expand that collaboration. We have different sources of funding, we have different legal forms, we have different paths to the development of our various clusters…but we all want to promote sustainable, science-based ocean industries that create good-paying Blue Jobs while addressing the world’s biggest challenges: food, water, energy, medicine, real estate, etc. As we like to say, it is our (collective) companies that are developing the technology and services to allow us understand the problems in the ocean…and it will be our companies that will help us solve them, which we can only do together. BTCA clusters are already active in locations around the world and now we are developing a more formalized cluster building capacity to help organize clusters in regions in Africa, Americas, Asia and the Pacific. 
     
    As Prof. Michael Porter wrote in his seminal article “Clusters and the New Economics of Competition” in the Harvard Business Review Nov-Dec 1998: Today’s economic map of the world is dominated by what I call clusters: critical masses—in one place—of unusual competitive success in particular fields. The time has come for Blue Economy and BlueTech clusters to be recognized for their importance and we are working hard to raise their profile globally. 
     
    As examples, TMA co-organized a cluster event as part of the first ever UN Ocean conference in June 2017; we will promote clusters at the Our Ocean conference in Malta in October; BlueTech Week 2017 will focus on cluster collaboration; we are working with The Economist as its “World Ocean Summit” in Mexico in March 2018 will focus on Blue Economy Clusters for the first time; clusters will be active and visible at Oceanology Intl. in London in March 2018; and the effort will continue far beyond 2018. 
     
     
    (As published in the October 2017 edition of Marine Technology Reporter)
  • At OI ‘14 Sonardyne International announced it is inviting qualifying academic establishments and research institutions to apply to participate in a Field Evaluation Program for its new family of acoustic modems, uComm. Applicants with an upcoming, short-term ocean science project that would benefit from an

  • If You Can’t Measure It, You Can’t Manage it … or Get Attention and Funding! Understanding and promoting the Blue Economy and BlueTech is critical for the future of the U.S. and the world.  Yet we don’t know in the U.S. and around the world how big our ocean and maritime tech industries are.  Why?

    • OTC-8O Maritime Reporter, Apr 1980 #12

    Housing Bureau and the official OTC travel agents during the Conference, May 5-8. Bus schedules will be available in the registration areas at the participating hotels and motels. Accommodations Excellent housing accommodations are available for OTC registrants in the city of Houston and nearby Galveston

  • the U.S. Department of the Interior. The Technical Program is being arranged by Anthony I. Eller of the Naval Research Laboratory. Participating organizations in OCEANS 78 include the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

  • The Northern California Section of The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers hosted the 1977 Spring Meeting/ STAR (Ship Technology and Research) Symposium at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, May 25-27. This event proved to be one of the most successful Spring Meetings in recent years

  • to participate in the ocean basin mapping campaigns that could inevitably be part of Seabed 2030.That said, how is Fugro benefitting tangibly from participating in the project?Even though our participation in Seabed 2030 is very new, Fugro is already benefiting in multiple ways. First, I think it is safe

  • from the Top,” moderated by Greg Trauthwein, Editor of Marine Technology Reporter. The panel was unique in that it featured six industry executives participating in a free-wheeling discussion on the means and mechanisms needed to drive the Blue Economy further faster. Participants in the panel included: Brett

  • second to print in conjunction with the January/February 2020 edition of MTR and distribute at Oceanology International in London.For information on participating in these special editions, contact Rob Howard at: howard@marinelink.com

  • and Stolt-Nielsen are pioneers in the parcel trade, with a long history of customer service in this unique area of ocean shipping. Other shipowners participating in the Stolt Tankers worldwide parcel tanker services are John Swire & Sons of the U.K.; Societe Francaise de Transports Maritimes, shipping affili

  • Kvaerner-Moss, Inc., the United States representative of Kvaerner Industrier A/S, has announced the appointment of James J. Victory as vice president. Mr. Victory will be responsible for the development and management of programs to increase the Kvaerner Group's exposure and participation in the

  • The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources based out of Biloxi, Miss., purchased a fully loaded Remotely Operate Vehicle (ROV) from DOE, Inc. (formerly Deep Ocean Engineering) in November 2012. The Triggerfish T4H ROV is a redesign of one of the most popular ROV’s ever made, Deep Ocean’s Phantom HD2.

  • MN Jun-19#25 PROPULSION
that when you lift the soundproof cowl, 
everythi)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 25

    PROPULSION that when you lift the soundproof cowl, everything is easily accessible. CIMCO also designed a similar mounting pat- tern as a Yamaha 200hp outboard; the prop uses the same spline and shaft. As Pim Polesie, the Chief Marketing Credit: OXE Of? cer for Cimco, explained, “The ap- proach was to

  • MN Jun-19#24 PROPULSION
T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
Credit:)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#21 response times and increasing report- ry selection criteria)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 21

    response times and increasing report- ry selection criteria listed in 33 CFR port, that this be codi? ed in regula- ing requirements. In the evolution of 155.4050 or suite of salvage services tions with due process to permit a fair this veri? cation program, the Coast outlined in 33 CFR 155.4030(b).

  • MN Jun-19#14 INSIGHTS
investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable

  • MN Jun-19#12  inspected barges (43.5%) participating in Streamlined Inspection)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 12

    investigations in 2018 1,946: Number of reportable marine casualty investigations in 2018 2,061: Number of inspected barges (43.5%) participating in Streamlined Inspection Program (SIP) 4,735: U.S. ? ag 2018 barge ? eet, representing 24% of the overall U.S. inspected domestic ? eet 19

  • MN Jun-19#10 BY THE NUMBERS
The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    BY THE NUMBERS The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report on Flag State Control The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report given the millions of lives at stake – in the U.S. ? ag ? eet. contains statistics regarding inspections and enforcement In 2018 there were 40 valid Flag State

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

  • MR Jun-19#61 MR
                                          
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC.GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition Naval Architects ? Naval Architecture Services and Marine Engineers ? Marine Engineering

  • MR Jun-19#58 This directory section is an editorial feature published)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Jun-19#57 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’  Marine Equipment)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

  • MR Jun-19#56 You’re invited to meet the leading players 
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    You’re invited to meet the leading players ??????????u????????????U?????????????? technology for passenger ships. See what’s possible when innovative suppliers Register now showcase their latest developments for the for your free pass booming cruise and ferry industry. marineinteriors- expo.com/pass ?????

  • MR Jun-19#55 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
NEW MT 603 Series 
Radio)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS NEW MT 603 Series Radio Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two

  • MR Jun-19#54 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
Ship IoT Tech: Enabling)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS Ship IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive Approach to Navigation Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA).

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
“The feasibility report showed)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

  • MR Jun-19#51 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

  • MR Jun-19#50 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

  • MR Jun-19#49 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

  • MR Jun-19#48 MarTID 2019
under management.  grows in size and establishes)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MarTID 2019 under management. grows in size and establishes many years METIs of data, this will be an important metric METIs globally have historically ‘car- to track. ried the water’ in terms of mariner train- Roughly two-thirds of the respondents ing, for regulatory compliance, licensing do not

  • MR Jun-19#47 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database creased their personal seafarer training The Future is Murky expenditure over the last ? ve years, and While “autonomy” more than 55% expect their personal garners its fair share of head- training expenditures to grow in the up- lines

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#45 world yearbook
system includes the underlying owners)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    world yearbook system includes the underlying owners, vessel opera- ates around 700 vessels at any one time”. Oldendorff tors (sometimes called “freight merchants”) and major Carriers estimated that its controlled ? eet (owned and charterers. On the tanker side, brokers Poten compiles chartered) stood

  • MR Jun-19#44 2019
its focus on liner cargo and the logistics of de-)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    2019 its focus on liner cargo and the logistics of de- emerging. Three years on, the expanded Cos- TABLE 2 livering boxes, the listed company has recently co completed another merger, acquiring Ori- divested investments in Danish supermarkets, ent Overseas Container Line (OOCL). Unlike THE WORLD’S

  • MR Jun-19#42 2019
TOP SHIPOWNERS: 
IS BIGGER BETTER?
Like any other)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    2019 TOP SHIPOWNERS: IS BIGGER BETTER? Like any other business, some shipping companies are bigger than others. This article looks at some of the larger participants in the various sectors. “Big” can be de? ned in multiple ways. Here, contributing editor Barry Parker takes a deep dive into the data

  • MR Jun-19#41 world yearbook
could be delivered to any one of seven)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    world yearbook could be delivered to any one of seven Top U.S. Ports cargo in value (in Millions) Top U.S. Ports Cargo (total tons) terminals in the “Los Angeles–Long RankU.S. Port 2018 2017 RankU.S. Port 2018 Tons2017 Tons Beach complex,” which is another way 1 Los Angeles $