Undersea Defense Technology

  • (The Rhode Island Subsea Sector is profiled in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technology Reporter. Rhode Island Governor Lincoln D. Chafee offers insights on the wealth of opportunity found in his state).

     

    As the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, Rhode Island was at the forefront of innovation, entrepreneurial creativity, and economic transformation, beginning with the Slater Mill in 1793.  Just as Rhode Island led our nation through the introduction of new manufacturing processes two hundred years ago, we continue to break new ground and promote economic growth through our maritime and defense industries, cutting-edge research institutions, and the Ocean State’s position as the country’s current leader for offshore wind energy.
    Only in Rhode Island can you find such a diverse range of defense and maritime-related expertise concentrated in such a small geographic footprint.  Our defense sector supports multiple Department of Defense and Homeland Security needs with a highly connected network of companies - from multinational corporations to start-ups that are moving out of the lab and into the marketplace.  Rhode Island excels in manufacturing and developing technology for everything from sophisticated nuclear submarines to wooden skiffs.
    From the establishment of the Newport Torpedo Station on Goat Island in 1869 to the emergence of today’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, Rhode Island has a long and proud history of leading the U.S. Navy’s undersea warfare research and system development efforts.  Rhode Island’s excellence in undersea warfare has fostered partnerships between the defense and private industries that have created thousands of quality jobs and support a strong supply chain of growing businesses in the state.  
    Rhode Island has also made critical infrastructure investments in our ports, including the Port of Davisville at the Quonset Business Park - home to well-known firms like General Dynamics Electric Boat – and the Port of Providence.  By taking steps to modernize our ports, one of our leading economic assets, we have expanded the capacity of Rhode Island to continue to be a premier hub for maritime activity for decades to come.   
    Rhode Island’s 400 miles of coastline has helped the state to become the center of world-class oceanographic research.  As a leading institute of ocean education and research, the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography is playing a key role in the development of ocean science, spanning the core disciplines of marine geology and geophysics, biology, atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and physics.
    In 1966, URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering was the first in the nation to establish Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Ocean Engineering.  The program conducts research and trains a world-renowned workforce in ocean robotics, underwater acoustics, tsunamis, coastal circulation, marine geomechanics, ocean structures, and offshore energy generation.  Graduates are employed by major corporations, small companies, and consulting firms, as well as major government research laboratories.
    Rhode Island led our country in a major economic transformation at the end of the 18th century, and the state is positioned to do so once again by paving the way in exploring the sound and effective development of offshore wind energy.  Through a partnership with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Rhode Island has provided critical scientific and technical information to identify the optimal areas for offshore renewable energy development. 
    A critical part of this process has been Rhode Island’s investment of more than $10 million in the creation of an Ocean Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for promoting balanced uses of our oceans.  Rhode Island is the only state that has adopted a SAMP in federal waters with a specific focus on the development of offshore renewable energy resources.  At the same time the Ocean SAMP was adopted, Rhode Island held a competitive process to choose a preferred developer for an offshore wind farm.  The developer has already made significant investments to establish a wind farm in state waters off Block Island, which could well be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.
    Utilizing the natural capital found throughout our state, Rhode Island will continue to lead as a regional and national center of excellence for renewable energy.
    Just as they have throughout Rhode Island’s history, our defense and maritime industries, educational and research institutions, technological advances, and coastal infrastructure are key economic advantages.  Rhode Island is open for business and continues to lead the way in the 21st century.   

    Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor, Rhode Island
     

    (As published in the March 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com)

  • and radar arrays on ships and submarines. Mikel Inc. MIKEL is a technology development and services company that provides innovative, cost-effective undersea solutions for the U.S. and foreign navies. MIKEL’s products enable its customers, especially those in the Submarine Force, to solve their technology

  • “UDT is a key event for us in this year’s exhibition calendar, drawing together global customers and suppliers involved in undersea defence technologies,” said Iain Kennedy, Strategy Director at QinetiQ. “The opportunity to network and arrange multiple meetings in one place is extremely valuable to us.

  • disciplines, including:  systems, electrical, RF, software, mechanical and oceanographic. Within the ECP Segment there are three product platforms.  Undersea Warfare (USW) Solutions provides full service design and manufacture of engineered solutions for the USW market. Precision Sensing & Measurement develops

  • in developing MAS and unmanned systems. “We are doing a lot of work in autonomy and automation,” Rear Admiral Moises DelToro III, Deputy Commander for Undersea Warfare, Naval Sea Systems Command; Commander, Naval Undersea Warfare Centet, United States Navy, told UDT. “Over the past 2-3 years there’s been

  • resolution imagery at superior coverage rates. Kraken’s series of SAS products called AquaPix leverages nearly two decades of R&D conducted by NATO’s Undersea Research Center and millions of dollars in funding support from NATO government sponsors. Kraken is currently engaged in various stages of technology

  • Dalmo Victor Division are leading manufacturers of radar warning systems and surveillance and targeting systems, complementing each other. The Undersea Systems Division is the foremost supplier of multi-beam bathymetric sonar mapping products to the free world, and Northern Scientific Laboratory is

  • provide safe, accurate exploration and monitoring in harsh environments. A wholly owned subsidiary of Battelle, Bluefin Robotics, manufactures unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) and batteries.    •    Submersibles: Battelle’s strengths are technology development and fielding customized systems. Battelle leverages

  • allows for bigger wind turbines and foundations, which increases manufacturing and production efficiency. Taking advantage of these efficiency gains, undersea cables are thereby addressing the challenges of inconsistent supply and demand; they enable power generated offshore – or in remote geographical locations

  • Marine Systems Division, of Seattle, Wash., recently created a new group to expand development activities in underwater transducer technology. The Undersea Sensor Group draws into one business unit the engineering, management, and laboratory resources necessary to support all of the d i v i s i o

  • allows for bigger wind turbines and foundations, which increases manufacturing and production efficiency. Taking advantage of these efficiency gains, undersea cables are thereby addressing the challenges of inconsistent supply and demand; they enable power generated offshore – or in remote geographical locations

  • dynamics of the industry, founding Riptide Autonomous Solutions. Riptide’s first product was the micro-UUV, a new, highly flexible, open source autonomous undersea vehicle that provides a state-of-the-art, low cost solution ideally suited for developers of autonomy and behaviors, power systems, subsea sensors

  • MN Jul-19#59 PRODUCTS
Beele’s SLIPSIL XL-120 Sealing 
Plugs Deliver)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 59

    PRODUCTS Beele’s SLIPSIL XL-120 Sealing Plugs Deliver Fire Safety Beele Engineering recently acquired the MED certi? cate for its SLIPSIL XL-120 plugs, which means they are CE certi? ed in accordance with the Marine Equipment Directive 2014/90/EU. The certi? cate relates to the SLIPSIL XL-120

  • MN Jul-19#54 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Johnson Allan Toma Garner Tadros)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 54

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Johnson Allan Toma Garner Tadros commercial marine space by pioneer- Merchant Marine Academy, George’s Huibers to Chair NMMA Engine ing autonomous control and advanced maritime roots run deep. He previous- Manufacturers Division perception systems that make surface ly held the

  • MN Jul-19#53 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Crowley  OMSA Danfoss 
Welch Remont)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Crowley OMSA Danfoss Welch Remont ZachariaGoldenberg Abisch Fuhrmann Sheff Nichols Wells Menzer OMSA announced the hire of Chad commercial and government new con- Crowley Announces Fuhrmann as Director of Regula- struction programs for the Company. Leadership Additions

  • MN Jul-19#50 ech file
T
Thrustmaster Invests in the Future
For over 35)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 50

    ech file T Thrustmaster Invests in the Future For over 35 years, Houston-based Thrustmaster of Texas quired, the headache of urea after treatment, and the cost has been a manufacturer of thrusters and waterjets. Over increase for tier 4 engines. Alternatively, Thrustmaster’s time, their business plan

  • MN Jul-19#49 with a 3D replay of their work while in the virtual envi-)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 49

    with a 3D replay of their work while in the virtual envi- Properly implemented XR experiences can also provide ronment. These tools help trainees eliminate ? aws in their immediate bene? ts in recruitment and evaluation, provid- application technique. Integrated ROI tracking provides ing objective

  • MN Jul-19#48 ech file
T
Lowering Shipbuilding Costs 
with Immersive)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 48

    ech file T Lowering Shipbuilding Costs with Immersive Training The ? ercely competitive domestic boatbuilding industry looks for any advantage in the day-to-day battle for bottom line ef? ciencies. ‘XR Technologies’ offer an edge to shipyards as they grow their workforce. By Matthew Wallace n the

  • MN Jul-19#46 COLUMN OP/ED
Stronger Together
NOIA, OMSA Partner to)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 46

    COLUMN OP/ED Stronger Together NOIA, OMSA Partner to Advance U.S. Vessel Opportunities in the Emerging Offshore Wind Sector. By Timothy Charters and Aaron Smith In 1941, geologist opened for offshore energy production in 1966, the ? rst Orval Lester Brace work was conducted by many of the men,

  • MN Jul-19#45 FIRE SAFETY
(*) all images courtesy Ramtech
of our WES)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 45

    FIRE SAFETY (*) all images courtesy Ramtech of our WES Hotspot, a new technology that monitors to operate and isolate the supply (via a current imbalance) electrical installations and equipment, alerting nominated ignition would have already occurred. personnel on-board to the risk of an electrical ? re

  • MN Jul-19#44 FIRE SAFETY
All Aboard with Fire Safety
The latest technolog)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 44

    FIRE SAFETY All Aboard with Fire Safety The latest technology can detect the risk of an on board electrical ? re – before it ignites. It’s not too late to incorporate this feature into your next workboat design. By John Newbury ire on board always poses a risk to life, although cer- Chapter II, the FSS

  • MN Jul-19#32 PROPULSION
U.S. Vessels: a cornucopia of engine rehab)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 32

    PROPULSION U.S. Vessels: a cornucopia of engine rehab possibilities … TYPE / AGE TOTALS <= 5 6-1011-1516-2021-25>25 TOTALS 42,542 6,8817,0654,2016,740 4,24313,353 Self-Propelled 9,410 837 925 652 814 4465,740 Dry Cargo 832 48 60 104 93 67 460 Tanker 79 21 22 14 7 3 12 Pushboat 3,382 421 353 169 196 1062

  • MN Jul-19#30 COLUMN PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY
Operating these multiple)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 30

    COLUMN PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY Operating these multiple power with ease. Many companies have in- tem have experience and tested power sources will require the proper power vested a lot of resources into research management software. The most cost- management infrastructure. When and development to create

  • MN Jul-19#28 COLUMN PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY
How to Get to Hybridization
By)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    COLUMN PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY How to Get to Hybridization By Jon Mosterd Hybridization in the marine world ciency and maximize output. Often, these systems are cou- is transitioning from the latest fad to pled with energy storage via batteries or super capacitors to a key part of vessel design and retro-

  • MN Jul-19#27 appropriate updates, current policies and procedures sat-)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 27

    appropriate updates, current policies and procedures sat- manmade disasters, and strengthens the critical resources isfactorily describe the strengths of OSVs and adequately that the greater industry offers. Versatile OSVs are capable address anticipated risks. Additionally, existing standards and

  • MN Jul-19#26 COLUMN OP/ED
A Measured Response:
The Offshore Sector’s)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    COLUMN OP/ED A Measured Response: The Offshore Sector’s Support of National Interests in Times of Crisis By Chad Fuhrmann D T C & Recovery Activities Subcommittee in late 2018. The ESPERATE IMES ALL FOR D R intent of the Subcommittee is to lay the foundation for IVERSE ESOURCES In 2017, North

  • MN Jul-19#18 INSIGHTS
River that some times acts like a unit tow – by)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 18

    INSIGHTS River that some times acts like a unit tow – by volume of The two biggest sticking points for the use of batter- ies on commercial vessels have been, until recently, vessels, this is properly the most common pushboat vessel weight and/or the physical footprint of these units operation in the US.

  • MN Jul-19#16 INSIGHTS
supplemented by an after treatment system –)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    INSIGHTS supplemented by an after treatment system – either the sion of these over 100-meter ferries, both built in 1991, costly EGR option or SCR that features additional piping, required installation of a 4160 kWh battery on each vessel, its own re? ll and urea storage tank and demands separate as

  • MN Jul-19#14 INSIGHTS
You have been quoted as saying, “Prior to every)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS You have been quoted as saying, “Prior to every major adoption of technology in the US inland river market there is a perfect alignment of opportunity and solution.” Tell us why inland operators are ? nally ready for hybrid and/or electri? cation of propulsion. Just as the diesel engine

  • MN Jul-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
Ben Bryant is Marine Market)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & Ben Bryant is Marine Market electronics and wireless tech- Manager at Klüber Lubrica- nology. He has been active in tion. A graduate of the Massa- the design, patenting and de- MarineNews chusetts Maritime Academy, velopment of a range of safety July 2019 he is a long-time

  • MN Jul-19#6 EDITOR’S NOTE
e have, within this edition of MarineNews)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    EDITOR’S NOTE e have, within this edition of MarineNews, many topics to cover; each as important as the next. These include our headliner of propulsion technology – a rapidly expanding W subject – as well as safety and ? re prevention, and the discussion surrounding ballast water treatment and as many

  • MN Jul-19#2 CONTENTS
MarineNews  July 2019  •  Volume 30   Number)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CONTENTS MarineNews July 2019 • Volume 30 Number 7 INSIGHTS 14 Edward C. Schwarz ABB Vice President of Sales, New Builds LUBRICANTS 22 Successful Sustainability Solutions Start with … Lubricants Unappreciated, but heavily used by operators and closely regulated by the authorities, lubricants

  • MN Jul-19#Cover The Information Authority for the Workboat • Offshore •)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: Cover

    The Information Authority for the Workboat • Offshore • Inland • Coastal Marine Markets Volume 30 • Number 7 arine JULY 2019 www.marinelink.com News M Propulsion Technology Many mandates, still more options VIDA Looming: Is it the answer? Safety The Final Piece of Environmental Compliance OMSA: not a

  • MN Jun-19#25 PROPULSION
that when you lift the soundproof cowl, 
everythi)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 25

    PROPULSION that when you lift the soundproof cowl, everything is easily accessible. CIMCO also designed a similar mounting pat- tern as a Yamaha 200hp outboard; the prop uses the same spline and shaft. As Pim Polesie, the Chief Marketing Credit: OXE Of? cer for Cimco, explained, “The ap- proach was to

  • MN Jun-19#24 PROPULSION
T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
Credit:)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#14 INSIGHTS
investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable