Using Technologies

  • Sonardyne International is taking part in a new Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) project within the Carbon Capture Storage (CCS) program to develop a Carbon Dioxide (CO2) marine and shallow subsurface monitoring system for underground CCS sites in the North Sea. The system will monitor for any CO2 leakage from saline aquifers and offshore storage sites such as oil and gas fields, both active and depleted.


    The development of a U.K.-based North Sea CCS industry is an important element in the government’s initiative to significantly cut greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, mitigating against high future energy costs and for developing high value, low carbon industries. Other members of the Consortium are lead participant Fugro GEOS Ltd., the National Environment Research Council (NERC – as represented by the National Oceanography Centre and British Geological Society), Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Southampton.


    Using technologies already proven in the offshore and oceanographic industries, combined with new remote sensing technology, the consortium will develop an integrated leak detection system that is capable of both wide area coverage by AUVs/ASVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicles/Autonomous Surface vehicles) and continuous automated monitoring of high risk areas. For these sites, the use of Sonardyne’s Automatic Leak Detection Sonar (ALDS) has been proposed. ALDS is both an active and passive sonar capable of monitoring more than one billion cubic feet of water for the smallest of leaks. The system is fully automated, offering reliable detection, rapid notification and localization of leaks. It provides continuous 360° coverage, detecting leaks after only tens of seconds.


    As the data is gathered from both ALDS, the AUVs/ASVs and other monitoring technologies, it will be relayed to shore using a combination of wireless acoustic and satellite communications and existing reservoir infrastructure acting as surface-to-shore relay stations. Sonardyne’s Autonomous Monitoring Transponders (AMTs) will form the core power, data logging and communications backbone for this data sensing and relay. AMT’s autonomously acquire acoustic ranges and sensor data is then time-stamped and logged internally for recovery via the integrated high-speed acoustic telemetry modem. This autonomy allows measurements to be made over long periods of time and a wide range of sensors for the detection of CO2 can be interfaced and integrated, providing an ultra-low power platform for up to five years unattended deployment.
    www.sonardyne.com

     

    (As published in the June 2014 edition of Marine Technology Reporter - http://www.marinetechnologynews.com/Magazine)

  • is powered by one gas turbine that operates in conjunction with two diesel EnviroEngines. The turbine replaces at least two diesel engines and by using two separate power systems, this unique oneof- a-kind configuration is designed to create a reliable and safe energy source. Described as the most

  • gas lay offshore Alaska and could help meet this energy demand. Dozens of wells were safely drilled in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas in the 1980s and 1990s using technology generations behind the modern technology used to safely drill a new well in the Chukchi Sea during the summer of 2015. Even though the hoped-for

  • satellite coverage allows us to track data throughout a vessel’s voyage with no need for onboard hardware. Software providers such as NAPA and BMT are using this data to provide efficiency analysis of power consumption and route, benchmarking it against the global fleet. This can also shine a light on,

  • safety and reduces the administrative costs of regulatory compliance. HTS will satisfy the bandwidth demands of IoT, as well. Vessel owners already are using technology to create automated ships, manned with smaller crews, that require robust satellite capacity for operations, navigation and onshore monitoring

  • stating that ship operators believe that data traffic will increase by nearly 60 percent over the next 2-3 years.   Great strides continue to be made in using technology to improve efficiency and reduce costs within ports and shipping. However, technology often brings increased risks according to Andrew Beckett

  • companies look to other industries for inspiration. One technology in particular that has had a big impact on business in the past ten years and is now causing big waves in the container shipping industry is the Cloud.The cloud facilitates the access of business data and applications from anywhere at any time

  • and more so. Cyber is how we are operating today, and more and more we need to figure out how to manage that risk,” said Thomas.Every business sector is using technology to drive efficiencies, productivity and profit, but few are as vital to the national economy and the flow of goods and materials as is the

  • Adams.   “We will also be providing the opportunity for ABTO members to discuss issues affecting their business. This will be achieved by conferences and using technology such as webinars and conference calls. We recognize that it is not always possible for members to travel to a major annual conference and

  • as I see ourselves helping our clients keeping their ships running safely and efficiently, without port delays or worse, detentions. I am therefore refocusing the company’s energies toward this immediate goal and client need. Longer term, I want to ensure that we strengthen and grow the four cornerstones

  • , snow, and sea states up to 3.5meters (about 11.5 feet.) It is fully motion compensated on six hydraulic legs, resulting in zero movement of the gangway. Using technology inspired by the flight simulator industry, Dutch offshore technology firm Ampelmann has enhanced the design of its conventional W2W system

  • or less for valves that are in these processes.” St. Jean went to explain that customers – marine operators, for example – were starting to be proactive in using technology that will get them to that 100 ppm level, and below. Hence, what W&O and Chesterton are now offering to barge outfits, has been around a

  • MN Jun-19#3rd Cover MARINE CRANES
Exceptional 
(Market) 
Reach Lifts a 
Crane)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 3rd Cover

    MARINE CRANES Exceptional (Market) Reach Lifts a Crane Retro? t to Success T e New York State Canal System, Advance Marine and MelCal Cranes all enjoy a reputation for versatile applications in challenging conditions. It’s no wonder that their recent deal to replace an aging maintenance crane

  • MN Jun-19#26 PROPULSION
and a slimmer submerged module. The gearbox and)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    PROPULSION and a slimmer submerged module. The gearbox and clutch ert Karlssen, Cimco test pilot and technician. system are continuously water-cooled which means that you The gear box makes it possible for the operator to change can use the trolling function without time limit,” said Rob- from left hand

  • MN Jun-19#25 PROPULSION
that when you lift the soundproof cowl, 
everythi)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 25

    PROPULSION that when you lift the soundproof cowl, everything is easily accessible. CIMCO also designed a similar mounting pat- tern as a Yamaha 200hp outboard; the prop uses the same spline and shaft. As Pim Polesie, the Chief Marketing Credit: OXE Of? cer for Cimco, explained, “The ap- proach was to

  • MN Jun-19#24 PROPULSION
T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
Credit:)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#22 COLUMN OP/ED
?  re?  ghting is not a pro?  table or)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    COLUMN OP/ED ? re? ghting is not a pro? table or sustainable venture. For determine that marine ? re? ghting services require dedi- example, to meet the regulatory standards ASA companies cated assets in contrast to vessels of opportunity currently have pre-positioned marine ? re? ghting equipment

  • MN Jun-19#14 INSIGHTS
investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable

  • MN Jun-19#10  Vessel Compliance (CG-CVC) using  randum of Understanding)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    contained in this report was compiled by the Of- mation on U.S. ? agged ships collected by the Paris Memo- ? ce of Commercial Vessel Compliance (CG-CVC) using randum of Understanding (MOU) and Tokyo MOU Port information from the Coast Guard’s Marine Information State Control Regimes. The data from these

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

  • MR Jun-19#62  OF MACHINERY AND HULLS. 
USING LASER TRACKERS, CMM ARMS)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    and rust USA OFFICE Ph: 832-203-7170 www.rustibus.com houston@rustibus.com In-water repairs 3D INSPECTION AND ALIGNMENT OF MACHINERY AND HULLS. USING LASER TRACKERS, CMM ARMS, TOTAL STATIONS, 3D PHOTOGRAMMETRY, STRAIN GAUGES, OPTICAL TOOLING. +32 3 213 53 00 SPECIALIZING IN PRECISION IN PLACE FIELD

  • MR Jun-19#61 MR
                                          
Professional)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC.GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition Naval Architects ? Naval Architecture Services and Marine Engineers ? Marine Engineering

  • MR Jun-19#58 This directory section is an editorial feature published)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Jun-19#57 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’  Marine Equipment)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

  • MR Jun-19#56 You’re invited to meet the leading players 
??????????u?????)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    You’re invited to meet the leading players ??????????u????????????U?????????????? technology for passenger ships. See what’s possible when innovative suppliers Register now showcase their latest developments for the for your free pass booming cruise and ferry industry. marineinteriors- expo.com/pass ?????

  • MR Jun-19#55  buses. It can be produced by using or- ates as a ‘blackbox’)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    and communica- used as fuel in parts of the transport sector, espe- tion through secure servers. The unit also oper- cially in buses. It can be produced by using or- ates as a ‘blackbox’, with no screen, keyboard or ganic waste, such that from ? sheries and forestry, mouse, diminishing risk from human interaction

  • MR Jun-19#54  and feedback to pilots using a system 
called Flight)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA). Now a similar concept is coming into the shipping industry. Danelec Marine, a manufacturer

  • MR Jun-19#52  the mainstream accep-
hydrogen using methane as a feedstock)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    creation on a global forming and partial oxidation produce gas. need to do a complete repower again. scale. Similar to the mainstream accep- hydrogen using methane as a feedstock, Although the Water-Go-Round project First you’re going from a mechanical tance of lique? ed natural gas (LNG) generally

  • MR Jun-19#51 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

  • MR Jun-19#50 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
By)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

  • MR Jun-19#49 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

  • MR Jun-19#48 MarTID 2019
under management.  grows in size and establishes)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MarTID 2019 under management. grows in size and establishes many years METIs of data, this will be an important metric METIs globally have historically ‘car- to track. ried the water’ in terms of mariner train- Roughly two-thirds of the respondents ing, for regulatory compliance, licensing do not

  • MR Jun-19#47 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database creased their personal seafarer training The Future is Murky expenditure over the last ? ve years, and While “autonomy” more than 55% expect their personal garners its fair share of head- training expenditures to grow in the up- lines

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#41 world yearbook
could be delivered to any one of seven)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    world yearbook could be delivered to any one of seven Top U.S. Ports cargo in value (in Millions) Top U.S. Ports Cargo (total tons) terminals in the “Los Angeles–Long RankU.S. Port 2018 2017 RankU.S. Port 2018 Tons2017 Tons Beach complex,” which is another way 1 Los Angeles $

  • MR Jun-19#29 world yearbook
FERRY FIRST
Alabama’s Gee’s Bend Ferry)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    world yearbook FERRY FIRST Alabama’s Gee’s Bend Ferry re- cently entered service after being converted from geared-diesel to Images courtesy Glosten/ALDOT become the ? rst zero-emission, New ATB for VANE electric-powered passenger/car In 2018, Vane Brothers took deliv- ferry in the U.S. Owned by the