Active Global Network

  • The U.S. Coast Guard has the enduring responsibility to safeguard the MTS and enable the uninterrupted flow of maritime commerce. 

     
    Our great Nation’s vast network of navigable waterways, deepwater ports and protected harbors are natural economic assets and provide unfettered access to the world’s two largest oceans. This powerful maritime capability sustains America’s national security and fuels economic prosperity through the 25,000 mile Marine Transportation System (MTS). The MTS supports thousands of ships and 250,000 American jobs, and serves as a $4.5 trillion economic lifeblood of the global economy, connecting Americans to domestic and global markets. It is critical infrastructure, and even the slightest disruptions to the MTS can have devastating impacts to the livelihood of all Americans.
     
    The U.S. Coast Guard has the enduring responsibility to safeguard the MTS and enable the uninterrupted flow of maritime commerce. This duty is becoming more challenging because the landscape of the marine environment is changing. Emerging technologies—the increased complexity in vessel designs, propulsion systems and operations; automation, robotics and networked systems; and new methods for offshore natural resource exploration, production and transportation—all create operating efficiencies and improvements for our just-in-time global supply chain. Yet, these same advancements can create concerns as well, as increasingly complex regulatory, legal and operational challenges must be addressed to prevent costly disruptions. 
     
    While rapid technological acceleration and digital integration pose challenges and can be risk aggravators, these factors also present opportunities for our Service to better enable commerce and safeguard the MTS. The Coast Guard must adapt and transform to leverage this technological wave to continue to keep pace with the technological advancements within the maritime industry and protect our economic lifeblood. The Coast Guard remains vigilant to manage unique risks and vulnerabilities to critical maritime infrastructure. The Coast Guard strives to build resiliency in the MTS and continues to work closely with our industry partners to develop and implement policy for rapid response and recovery operations when waterways and port closures occur. 
     
    For example, following the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, the Coast Guard employed electronic aids to navigation (e-ATON) to temporarily mark the location of buoys and other physical aids that were destroyed or damaged along the Gulf Coast. The location of the individual e-ATONs, which were transmitted over the Nationwide Automatic Identification System (NAIS), could be “seen” by any mariner with a radar or electronic charting system capable of displaying AIS information. Additionally, as a backup to the NAIS network, a portable AIS system was deployed to the effected regions in Texas. The system provided the ability to broadcast e-ATON in areas where NAIS did not cover. These efforts contributed to the reopening of affected ports several days earlier than originally anticipated. This is just one example of many that highlight how we leverage new technologies to ensure the MTS offers reliable and secure solutions to navigational challenges. 
     
    The Coast Guard will accelerate integration of modern navigation systems into a world-class network of buoys and beacons. American economic global competitiveness depends on a modern, state-of-the-art intermodal ports and waterways network. To achieve this, the Coast Guard must leverage technological advancements, artificial intelligence, and big data analytics to keep in step with emerging trends and better manage risk. Working with industry, the Coast Guard can smartly balance traditional navigation structures while creating the next generation waterways management systems, adapting regulatory frameworks, applications and standards to emerging technologies and the changing maritime domain. 
     
    Moreover, the Coast Guard must recapitalize its antiquated aids to navigation vessels, which are vital infrastructure needed to support the proper functioning of the MTS. An alarming number of Coast Guard buoy and construction tenders remain in the active Coast Guard inventory well beyond their service life, jeopardizing the Service’s organic capability to establish, maintain, and repair beacons and buoys in America’s waterways. Mariners depend on fixed and floating aids to navigation to safely navigate and prevent catastrophic accidents such as collisions, allisions and groundings. These Coast Guard vessels maintain and repair the fixed and floating aids to ensure they are properly positioned to act like road signs on the waterways. 
     
    The Coast Guard must strengthen an adaptive workforce that is comfortable operating in volatility amid the rapid acceleration of technology, maintaining awareness over marine industry trends and innovations that have the potential to transform, or possibly disrupt, the maritime transportation sector. The Coast Guard will judiciously expand the use of Third Party Organizations (TPOs) to approve commercial vessel plans, conduct surveys and issue certain required certificates on its behalf. At the same time, the Coast Guard will strengthen third-party oversight, auditing, and integrated risk management to ensure the highest standards of compliance. 
     
    As the Subchapter M compliance date grows closer, the Coast Guard is taking several steps to minimize negative impacts and ensure all parties are fully prepared, including multiple training opportunities and a variety of industry outreach efforts. The goal is a smooth transition for both Coast Guard and industry members that does not impede commerce. The overall intent is not only to bring this part of the maritime industry into compliance with Subchapter M regulations. Rather, it is a model of the increased level of commitment the Coast Guard is taking throughout the maritime industry to jointly create a safer and more resilient MTS for the future.
     
    Any disruption to the MTS, whether man-made or natural, is a major event that can result in a cascading and potentially devastating impact on the domestic and global supply chain and, consequently, America’s economy and national security. To best facilitate maritime commerce, ensure unrestricted and unimpeded trade and travel through America’s waterways, the Coast Guard will continue to improve its capabilities and rely on its strong partnerships among all members of the maritime community. Working together, we can ensure the MTS will remain healthy and support America’s economic prosperity. 
     
     
    The Author
    Rear Admiral John Nadeau is Assistant Commandant for Prevention Policy, USCG.
     
     
    (As published in the February 2018 edition of Marine News)
  • to get an early start with the new system. GPS satellite coverage is currently available for marine navigation up to 9-10 hours per day, using the six active prototype Block 1 satellites now in orbit. They will be supplemented, starting in early 1989, with additional Block 11 satellites, and the system

  • While the true uptake of broadband across the maritime sector has been slow to develop, a number of market conditions are conspiring to drive the service mainstream. Intelsat’s Kurt Riegelman discusses the matter with Maritime Reporter & Engineering News.   While the advent of full broadband in the

  • The marine satellite communication business has many earmarks suggesting it is set to expand rapidly, with a recent run of corporate consolidations and a seemingly endless offering of new products and services designed to emulate the speed and reliability of landbased services at sea. Marine industry

  • for developing and operating fit-for-purpose ocean observing systems and their integration into modeling and forecasting activities. The EU has also been active in implementing a Europe-wide effort to promote the accessibility and use by multiple sectors of marine data. The European Marine Observation and Data

  • listing charter fixtures as they are reported in London, with their counterparts in New York and Tokyo continuing the procedure as these markets become active. Pointing to time zone differences, he said that by the time the business day begins in New York City, five or six hours of data will already have

  • Norway's PGS Geophysical renewed its global satellite communications agreement with Telenor through June 2005. The current agreement calls for Telenor to continue to provide its fully managed Sealink service to a PGS Geophysical fleet of 14 high-tech 3-D seismic vessels operating around the world.

  • Streamlined trade management through automated document creation and compliance checking. Reduce Delays: Eliminate noncompliance Reduce Risk: Proactive denied party screening of all parties and locations on every transaction. Reduced Brokerage Fees: Automated item classification, import and export

  • and termination solutions, advanced NEXUS and EMO fiber optic telemetry systems, electric CORMAC and MERMAC winch, handling and LARS systems including active heave compensation (AHC) winches for ROVs. The MacArtney range of fast and precise remotely operated towed vehicles (ROTV) includes the MacArtney FOCUS

  • If visions of the family dog bringing its master a paper, pipe and slippers is a part of Americana folklore. Maritime Telecommunications Network, Inc. (MTN) delivery of daily news to residents aboard the world's most unique cruise ship is visions of the future. MTN has entered an agreement with Reside

  • MacAPI), cable and termination systems, advanced NEXUS fibre optic telemetry systems, electric CORMAC and MERMAC winch, handling and LARS systems including active heave compensation (AHC) winches for ROVs. The MacArtney range of fast and precise remotely operated towed vehicles (ROTV) includes the MacArtney FOCUS-2

  • In a move which perhaps heralds the next plateau in at-sea communications. Maritime Telecommunications Network (MTN) in Miami announced an innovative partnership in which its satellite communications network will be used for a new service developed and patented by BT A&M, BT's satellite communications

  • MN Jul-19#60  be discharged or released from active  ceipt, storage, Quality)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 60

    STOREKEEPER that the service member is expected to Directives. Follows procurement, re- Military Sealift Command be discharged or released from active ceipt, storage, Quality Assurance (QA) Salary: $33,295 Per Annum Full Time duty service under honorable condi- and expenditure procedures for all

  • MN Jul-19#53 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Crowley  OMSA Danfoss 
Welch Remont)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Crowley OMSA Danfoss Welch Remont ZachariaGoldenberg Abisch Fuhrmann Sheff Nichols Wells Menzer OMSA announced the hire of Chad commercial and government new con- Crowley Announces Fuhrmann as Director of Regula- struction programs for the Company. Leadership Additions

  • MN Jul-19#51 VESSELS
Lake Assault Fireboat Now on Duty in Georgia)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 51

    VESSELS Lake Assault Fireboat Now on Duty in Georgia vides ? re suppression and emergency response services. The craft can quickly transport water into a network of stand- pipes located along the shoreline to supply lake water for ground-based ? re? ghting operations. Moreover, its deck- mounted

  • MN Jul-19#46 COLUMN OP/ED
Stronger Together
NOIA, OMSA Partner to)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 46

    COLUMN OP/ED Stronger Together NOIA, OMSA Partner to Advance U.S. Vessel Opportunities in the Emerging Offshore Wind Sector. By Timothy Charters and Aaron Smith In 1941, geologist opened for offshore energy production in 1966, the ? rst Orval Lester Brace work was conducted by many of the men,

  • MN Jul-19#45  activates as  solution that actively prevents electrical)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 45

    , the technolo- start. Advances such as this provide an effective, easy to ? t gy provides permanent monitoring of heat and activates as solution that actively prevents electrical ? res – making it soon as abnormal temperatures (80ºC ± 5°C) are detected. highly valued by workboat owners and operators

  • MN Jul-19#28 COLUMN PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY
How to Get to Hybridization
By)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    COLUMN PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY How to Get to Hybridization By Jon Mosterd Hybridization in the marine world ciency and maximize output. Often, these systems are cou- is transitioning from the latest fad to pled with energy storage via batteries or super capacitors to a key part of vessel design and retro-

  • MN Jul-19#27  in-
organizations. Chad is active in various industry volunteer)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 27

    . As a proposed of marine operations at the individual level and within solution, the NOSAC Subcommittee’s ongoing work in- organizations. Chad is active in various industry volunteer volves de? ning a new endorsement for eligible OSVs – the efforts including the National Offshore Safety Advisory

  • MN Jul-19#14 INSIGHTS
You have been quoted as saying, “Prior to every)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS You have been quoted as saying, “Prior to every major adoption of technology in the US inland river market there is a perfect alignment of opportunity and solution.” Tell us why inland operators are ? nally ready for hybrid and/or electri? cation of propulsion. Just as the diesel engine

  • MN Jul-19#8  Lubrica- nology. He has been active in 
tion. A graduate of)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & Ben Bryant is Marine Market electronics and wireless tech- Manager at Klüber Lubrica- nology. He has been active in tion. A graduate of the Massa- the design, patenting and de- MarineNews chusetts Maritime Academy, velopment of a range of safety July 2019 he is a long-time

  • MN Jul-19#6 EDITOR’S NOTE
e have, within this edition of MarineNews)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    EDITOR’S NOTE e have, within this edition of MarineNews, many topics to cover; each as important as the next. These include our headliner of propulsion technology – a rapidly expanding W subject – as well as safety and ? re prevention, and the discussion surrounding ballast water treatment and as many

  • MN Jun-19#24 PROPULSION
T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
Credit:)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#18 INSIGHTS
our customers will only be happy if they can use)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 18

    INSIGHTS our customers will only be happy if they can use the engine The CXO300 is said to have a 100% higher peak torque at the crankshaft than the leading gasoline 300hp out- to go out to sea reliably. We have put in place stringent cus- boards, which enables the craft to move more weight tomer service

  • MN Jun-19#14 INSIGHTS
investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable

  • MN Jun-19#2 CONTENTS
MarineNews  June 2019  •  Volume 30   Number)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CONTENTS MarineNews June 2019 • Volume 30 Number 6 INSIGHTS 14 Joel Reid Global Sales Director, COX Powertrain OP/ED 20 A Reassessment of the U.S. Marine Salvage Posture By Jim Elliott FeaturesFeatures Credit: OXE MARINE CRANES 24 The OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Cimco Marine’s 200hp

  • MR Jun-19#3rd Cover POWERFUL MARKET 
INTELLIGENCE
UNPARALLELED BUSINESS)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 3rd Cover

    POWERFUL MARKET INTELLIGENCE UNPARALLELED BUSINESS INSIGHTS, DATA, AND MARKET ANALYTICS COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update

  • MR Jun-19#64 MR JUNE 2019_Index:Layout 1  6/4/2019  1:20 PM  Page)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    MR JUNE 2019_Index:Layout 1 6/4/2019 1:20 PM Page 1 ADVERTISER INDEX Page Advertiser Website Phone # 15 . . . . . .ABS Americas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.eagle.com/cybersecurity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • MR Jun-19#60  Opportunities 
Act (VEOA).  Active Duty Service Members (ADSMs))
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    Oppor- Sealift Command Civil Service Mariner (CIVMAR) eligible tunities Act (VEOA). to apply under the Veterans Employment Opportunities Act (VEOA). Active Duty Service Members (ADSMs) Deck Engineer Machinist Ordinary Seaman Advancement Program Military Sealift Command must submit a certi? cation (i

  • MR Jun-19#57 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’  Marine Equipment)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

  • MR Jun-19#55 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
NEW MT 603 Series 
Radio)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS NEW MT 603 Series Radio Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two

  • MR Jun-19#54  IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive 
Approach to Navigation)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS Ship IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive Approach to Navigation Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA).

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
“The feasibility report showed)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

  • MR Jun-19#49 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

  • MR Jun-19#47 , 
on land and in the air, actively pursue 
improving safety)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    mental. At the same time managing crew competency; the maritime industry, following trends - METI: Complying with regulations, on land and in the air, actively pursue improving safety and improving crew various levels of automation which will competency, and; eventually change the responsibilities, -

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing