Tain Applications

  • — F r e e Literature Available Research and experience indicates . . . initially through Navy submarine fire control training and later through shiphandling training . . .

    that using sophisticated computergenerated models during classroom review of training conducted during computer-based simulation is valuable, particularly when the material is presented via a large screen display.

    Through instructor and student interactive use of computerdriven review equipment, key concepts are effectively illustrated, reducing training time by up to 50 percent and achieving better student understanding of the underlying concepts associated with the complex process being simulated.

    These impressive results cannot be matched by traditional simulation training methodology. Additionally, the graphic presentation of student performance data during simulator exercise critique sessions can provide important insights on student performance that traditional discussion cannot match.

    Based on the success of these new computer-based capabilities in various training applications, it was suggested that they may also have substantial benefits for training marine engineering skills. In 1985, District 2, MEBA-AMO, Safety and Education Plan joined with the U.S. Maritime Administration in a Cooperative Research Program to develop a prototype system for marine engineering training applications. The Computer-Aided Marine Engineering Training System (CAMETS), developed by Ship Analytics during this program, consists of a micro computer, a graphics terminal employed as an instructor station, and a large screen display system driven by a Ship Analytics-developed software program. (See Figure 1).

    CAMETS is presently being utilized to support ongoing training at the Maritime Training and Research Center (MTRC) simulation facility in Toledo, Ohio. Operating Systems include: • A medium-speed diesel propulsion system comprised of twin diesel engines modeled on a Pielstick 2.2 "V" 16-cylinder turbocharged medium- speed reversable engine.

    • A steam propulsion system consisting of high-pressure ahead and low-pressure astern impulse-type turbines.

    • An electrical generation system comprised of one turbo and two diesel alternators which can be configured to a variety of training requirements.

    • Cargo/ballast system based on a Great Lakes self-unloading bulk carrier with five cargo holds and 13 ballast tanks.

    CAMETS can be employed to provide a variety of interactive graphic displays—illustrated in Figures 2 and 3—which can be effectively utilized even if a training facility does not have an engine room simulator. These "standalone" displays allow the instructor to change a wide variety of settings (e.g., fuel temperature, injector fouling) on the simulated engine, and illustrate graphically their impact on engine performance.

    The "linked" displays, which ob- tain their data from exercises conducted on the engine room simulator, graphically depict variations in key engine parameters and student control actions over the entire exercise period. Multiple parameters can be presented on one display, facilitating instructor/student discussion of key interactions (e.g., the impact of turbocharger fouling on fuel consumption). Key benefits of this technology are: • Reduction of the time required to achieve specific learning objectives, resulting in course length reduced by 50 percent.

    • Reduction of the need for an instructor through self-teaching modes thereby increasing instructor productivity and the required ration of instructors to trainees.

    • Built-in measurement of trainee performance to assure learning is achieved.

    • Overcomes language barriers and instructor-related variables which play a dominant role in effective training (e.g., the computer model, arranged graphically, is easily understood by the trainee as opposed to an instructor's attempt to explain a complex multi-variable process in his own words).

    A one-week training program was designed specifically to implement CAMETS, primarily for chief engineers.

    However, the majority of the material covered is also appropriate for watch-standers, prospective watch-standers, and shore-side personnel.

    The program focuses on the effective operation of a mediumspeed diesel plant with a controllable- pitch propeller. Other potential shipboard energy-saving areas, such as proper tank heating and vessel operational planning, are also addressed.

    The training program, using both the MTRC engine room simulator and the Computer-Aided Marine Engineering Training System, translate into effective dollars saved through energy movement.

    Additional courses offered at the MTRC are: Casualty Control and Emergency Procedures; Effective Monitoring of Unattended Machinery Spaces; Diesel Plant Operation for Steam Engineers; and Operation of Automatic Load-Sharing Electrical Generator Systems.

    For more information on available training programs and a free copy of the MTRC brochure, C i r c l e 5 4 on Reader Service Card

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  • The 23,500-dwt combination container-roll-on/roll-off ship John B. Waterman (shown above) was christened recently at the Sun Ship yard in Chester, Pa. Sponsor of the vessel was Mrs. George B. Moran, wife of a director of Waterman Industries, during a brief ceremony. The 692-foot Waterman is being co

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  • polish the valves so as to take account of all the special forces and gas flows to which the valves are exposed during operation. Markisches Werk maintains strict manufacturing and production controls to ensure the quality of its products. These controls begin with the receipt of the raw materials

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  • Quick-Connects with polyethylene seals are now available from Swagelok Quick-Connect Co., Solon, Ohio. This new feature, along with all 316 stainless steel construction, makes the "QT" Series ideal for heavy duty, high pressure and corrosive applications where other seal materials are unacceptable.

  • —Free Literature A v a i l a b l e— Atlas 8630 VTC, a new modular 16-inch Rasterscan radar with integral keyboard facilities specifically designed for vessel traffic control applications, was recently introduced by Krupp Atlas Elektronik. Suitable for either stand-alone operation or installation as

  • —Free Literature Available— A medium-speed diesel engine designed for heavy fuel operation and low fuel oil consumption is an ideal basis for engines with the load profile for naval operations. Such medium-speed engines should be designed for: continuous operation; dependability; excellent economy;

  • MR Nov-19#75 E
EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES
AMETEK Land Emissions)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 75

    E EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES AMETEK Land Emissions Monitoring AMETEK Land, a provider of combus- tion ef? ciency and environmental pollutant emissions monitoring instrumentation, has launched two new continuous emission mon- itoring systems (PM-CEMS) to provide accu- rate and reliable measurement of

  • MR Nov-19#64 VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE,)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    VOICES NICK BROWN, DIRECTOR OF MARINE AND OFFSHORE, LLOYD’S REGISTER 5 minutes with LR’s Nick Brown By Greg Trauthwein “LR research suggests that the cheap- est zero carbon fuels are going to be at least double the price of fuels today.” Nick Brown, Lloyd’s Register Photo: Lloyd’s Register To kick things

  • MR Nov-19#55  change past practices, 
may contain hazardous substances like)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    pressure cycle as “hazardous waste” because they through the EU Ship Scrapping Regula- recycling”. on shipowners to change past practices, may contain hazardous substances like tion (SSR) (Regulation 2013/1257). As When it comes time to recycle a ves- many shipping companies are turning “asbestos

  • MR Nov-19#43  you  nization. 
in certain applications it can outperform)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    orga- tional? No. But life is a compromise and You can have a cort nozzle that solves down the vessel at 90 degrees than you nization. in certain applications it can outperform that, but as the thrust comes out, the do turning them around 180 degrees. It’s We now have Z-drive simulations and conventional

  • MR Nov-19#42 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
That’s signi?  cant …)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY That’s signi? cant … were questions in the industry as to the solution. In my ? rst 12 months my con- gether.” And from that point on, we have It is signi? cant. There are still naysay- units robustness. versations with ZF were challenging to re? ned the Z-drive we

  • MR Nov-19#41  and help to better serve  tained per day, upriver-downriver)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    that help you From a performance, speed over ground, miles at- addition to being transporters of product. a competitive advantage and help to better serve tained per day, upriver-downriver, we compete evenly your customers? or better than vessels that have signi? cantly more horse- When you look at your competitiv

  • MR Nov-19#36  working for a marine company. tain believed in mentoring young)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    , but it got me to Texas where I met my I was fortunate on my ? rst (USCG) ship that the cap- ? nd a way. wife, who was working for a marine company. tain believed in mentoring young people. I was a deck of? cer but I asked if I could get involved in engineer- So tell me about the patents you hold. How

  • MR Nov-19#18 D
DESIGN: BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD
-cally no longer so)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    D DESIGN: BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD -cally no longer so dif? cult. sion pods in the 250 kW range (I would and a better engine room). seating to keep passengers safe in foil Foiling math is fun, and it is now well like to use four and she is a 1000 kW I would like her to be a bow loader collisions

  • MR Nov-19#15  
demnify each other for certain types of  will either not)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    and in- see poorly drafted damage waivers that removed. This seems like typical rock ing room, be an indicator of far greater demnify each other for certain types of will either not survive judicial scrutiny star/diva behavior. However, National problems with the contract at hand. claims or situations

  • MR Nov-19#12  that keeps track of items in- tain computerized equipment)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    to work out how to main- Norfolk. The incident was classi? ed for integrated into a system the greater the refrigerator that keeps track of items in- tain computerized equipment that has an some time. number of potential targets for hackers. side and will advise you when you are extended lifespan.

  • MR Nov-19#7 simple isn)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 7

    simple isn't always easy... But furuno radars are a simple choice Your objective is simple…Deliver your vessel and its contents safely and on time. While it might sound simple, we know it’s not easy! Whether you’re navigating the open ocean, busy harbors, or through congested inland waterways, being aware

  • MR Nov-19#6  the numbers, and for certain applications the  opportunities)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    on the new offshore wind job Roland Persson Orn Marketing AB, Box 184 , S-271 24 Grimm and his team manage the ? eet by the numbers, and for certain applications the opportunities and challenges; the role Ystad, Sweden t: +46 411-184 00 fuel consumption numbers coming from his Z-Drive units tell the

  • MN Nov-19#100 PRODUCTS
HOLDFAST – Engineered with 
One Key Goal in Mind:)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 100

    PRODUCTS HOLDFAST – Engineered with One Key Goal in Mind: Grip Holdfast utilizes HMPE and nylon ? ber to deliver a lightweight, high- strength, ? oating line that will grip on H-bitts and capstans much bet- ter than traditional 100% HMPE lines. Holdfast is coated with TEUFELBERGER’s proprietary

  • MN Nov-19#94 VESSELS
SCHOTTEL Delivers Propulsion for World’s First)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 94

    VESSELS SCHOTTEL Delivers Propulsion for World’s First Emission-Free Pushboat eration of Maritime Systems at the Technical University of Berlin, will be equipped with rudderpropellers from SCHOTTEL. The hybrid canal push boat is powered by a combination of fuel cells, batteries and an electric motor.

  • MN Nov-19#89  – like 
standards are contained in rules estab- on a)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 89

    , partnering other marine-related facilities. These with the provision of test results based with a knowledgeable company – like standards are contained in rules estab- on a non-speci? c inspection. Bosch Rexroth, for example – for lished by each individual society. The second category is de?

  • MN Nov-19#86 ech file
T
MacGregor’s MacGregor’s 
Fiber-rope Fiber-rope)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 86

    ech file T MacGregor’s MacGregor’s Fiber-rope Fiber-rope Crane for Crane for Offshore Offshore MarketsMarkets acGregor, part of Cargotec, has completed the construction of FibreTrac, the ? rst ? ber-rope off- shore crane to enter the market. The crane’s full M potential is being validated and its

  • MN Nov-19#84 CAD/CAM SOFTWARE
Software 
Tools for 
Propeller 
Professiona)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 84

    CAD/CAM SOFTWARE Software Tools for Propeller Professionals TrueProp is software for propeller inspection devices, assisting propeller manufacturers and repair shops to identify damage, repair and tune propellers to improve performance and save fuel. By Adam Kaplan aving the right tools for the

  • MN Nov-19#79  applications.  to persuade certain)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 79

    TECHNOLOGY source library for digital applications. to persuade certain

  • MN Nov-19#78  autonomous capabilities is sim- taining stringent cyber security)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 78

    Kongsberg Maritime. The thinking be- balancing transparency with con? dentiality – and main- hind the ? reboat’s ? exibly autonomous capabilities is sim- taining stringent cyber security protocols. The fear is that ply to enable ? rst responders to tackle hazardous port ? res having to use a series of different

  • MN Nov-19#60  M: One Year In
Industry SME (Captain) Pat Folan weighs in from)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 60

    REGULATORY REVIEW Subchapter M: One Year In Industry SME (Captain) Pat Folan weighs in from the front lines. *All images: Pat Folan t has been an interesting year for towing industry. blue water COI’s and TVE’s being scrutinized to the same As the new Subchapter M towboat rule rolled out, it degree? If

  • MN Nov-19#53 PROPULSION
2016 for marine high performance  The D8 engine)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    PROPULSION 2016 for marine high performance The D8 engine combined with and serial hybrid propulsion systems. and leisure applications. This was fol- Stamford generators create a genset Next generation power generation lowed by a new variant that boasted portfolio tailor-made to auxiliary is indeed

  • MN Nov-19#52 PROPULSION
withstand higher torque. power across the range)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 52

    PROPULSION withstand higher torque. power across the range while simul- Stage V. The product will be released The engineering modi? cations in- taneously delivering 1% to 7% better in two steps: the ? rst release will be clude new materials. For example, fuel economy. IMO II, EPA, and China legislations

  • MN Nov-19#49  ways of becoming more sus-
tainable and investing toward)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 49

    is growing. I think it’s important to realize though, while we speak more about electri? cation, there are many different ways of becoming more sus- tainable and investing toward the fu- ture,” said Inden. “It’s everything in- Credit: Greg Trauthwein 49 www.marinelink.com MN MN Nov19 Layout 32-49

  • MN Nov-19#32  technologies make maintaining cellular 
and internet)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 32

    Here’s how it works: Agile’s marine line of military grade, ruggedized, long-range, multi-SIM card, smart routing communications technologies make maintaining cellular and internet connections seamless. The company estimates it can save on satellite costs as much as 50%. Agile Ma- rine products boast