Tain Applications

  • — F r e e Literature Available Research and experience indicates . . . initially through Navy submarine fire control training and later through shiphandling training . . .

    that using sophisticated computergenerated models during classroom review of training conducted during computer-based simulation is valuable, particularly when the material is presented via a large screen display.

    Through instructor and student interactive use of computerdriven review equipment, key concepts are effectively illustrated, reducing training time by up to 50 percent and achieving better student understanding of the underlying concepts associated with the complex process being simulated.

    These impressive results cannot be matched by traditional simulation training methodology. Additionally, the graphic presentation of student performance data during simulator exercise critique sessions can provide important insights on student performance that traditional discussion cannot match.

    Based on the success of these new computer-based capabilities in various training applications, it was suggested that they may also have substantial benefits for training marine engineering skills. In 1985, District 2, MEBA-AMO, Safety and Education Plan joined with the U.S. Maritime Administration in a Cooperative Research Program to develop a prototype system for marine engineering training applications. The Computer-Aided Marine Engineering Training System (CAMETS), developed by Ship Analytics during this program, consists of a micro computer, a graphics terminal employed as an instructor station, and a large screen display system driven by a Ship Analytics-developed software program. (See Figure 1).

    CAMETS is presently being utilized to support ongoing training at the Maritime Training and Research Center (MTRC) simulation facility in Toledo, Ohio. Operating Systems include: • A medium-speed diesel propulsion system comprised of twin diesel engines modeled on a Pielstick 2.2 "V" 16-cylinder turbocharged medium- speed reversable engine.

    • A steam propulsion system consisting of high-pressure ahead and low-pressure astern impulse-type turbines.

    • An electrical generation system comprised of one turbo and two diesel alternators which can be configured to a variety of training requirements.

    • Cargo/ballast system based on a Great Lakes self-unloading bulk carrier with five cargo holds and 13 ballast tanks.

    CAMETS can be employed to provide a variety of interactive graphic displays—illustrated in Figures 2 and 3—which can be effectively utilized even if a training facility does not have an engine room simulator. These "standalone" displays allow the instructor to change a wide variety of settings (e.g., fuel temperature, injector fouling) on the simulated engine, and illustrate graphically their impact on engine performance.

    The "linked" displays, which ob- tain their data from exercises conducted on the engine room simulator, graphically depict variations in key engine parameters and student control actions over the entire exercise period. Multiple parameters can be presented on one display, facilitating instructor/student discussion of key interactions (e.g., the impact of turbocharger fouling on fuel consumption). Key benefits of this technology are: • Reduction of the time required to achieve specific learning objectives, resulting in course length reduced by 50 percent.

    • Reduction of the need for an instructor through self-teaching modes thereby increasing instructor productivity and the required ration of instructors to trainees.

    • Built-in measurement of trainee performance to assure learning is achieved.

    • Overcomes language barriers and instructor-related variables which play a dominant role in effective training (e.g., the computer model, arranged graphically, is easily understood by the trainee as opposed to an instructor's attempt to explain a complex multi-variable process in his own words).

    A one-week training program was designed specifically to implement CAMETS, primarily for chief engineers.

    However, the majority of the material covered is also appropriate for watch-standers, prospective watch-standers, and shore-side personnel.

    The program focuses on the effective operation of a mediumspeed diesel plant with a controllable- pitch propeller. Other potential shipboard energy-saving areas, such as proper tank heating and vessel operational planning, are also addressed.

    The training program, using both the MTRC engine room simulator and the Computer-Aided Marine Engineering Training System, translate into effective dollars saved through energy movement.

    Additional courses offered at the MTRC are: Casualty Control and Emergency Procedures; Effective Monitoring of Unattended Machinery Spaces; Diesel Plant Operation for Steam Engineers; and Operation of Automatic Load-Sharing Electrical Generator Systems.

    For more information on available training programs and a free copy of the MTRC brochure, C i r c l e 5 4 on Reader Service Card

  • of 12 weeks, would work full time at the company. According to owner-president, J. William Kenney, Boston Shipyard currently occupies 19 acres con- taining 10 buildings, five piers, five cranes, and three drydocks. The company is presently expanding to include 43 adjacent acres with four deepwater

  • The 23,500-dwt combination container-roll-on/roll-off ship John B. Waterman (shown above) was christened recently at the Sun Ship yard in Chester, Pa. Sponsor of the vessel was Mrs. George B. Moran, wife of a director of Waterman Industries, during a brief ceremony. The 692-foot Waterman is being co

  • new Trident Submarine Base will result in economic growth in the Kings Bay region. The Fiscal Year 1981 budget con- Write 414 on Reader Service Card tains $12.1 million for architectural and engineering services for base planning and design. The base construction, which could begin in 1982 and be

  • appropriate response would involve "building new ships to replace operationally unsuitable or unserviceable ones, in numbers and of a size which main- tain a broad balance between supply and demand." Basil Papachristidis, chairman of Papachristidis (UK), said the major oil companies' role as investors

  • in specific fuel consumption, carbon deposits, exhaust smoke levels, and metallic deposits in a test engine operated on a residual oil blend containing high levels of carbon residue, vanadium, sodium and sulfur. Drew Ameroid® Marine, producer of chemical products and technical services through its

  • either $67.50 per share in cash or a number of shares of Northrop Grumman common stock designed to provide a value of $67.50, subject to cer- tain limitations and proration proced u r e s . N o r t h r o p G r u m m a n expects to p r o m p t l y amend its existing offer d,o cum„ en.t

  • polish the valves so as to take account of all the special forces and gas flows to which the valves are exposed during operation. Markisches Werk maintains strict manufacturing and production controls to ensure the quality of its products. These controls begin with the receipt of the raw materials

  • are custom built to customer's specific height requirements, are quick and easy to install, and are available in carbon steel (painted or galvanized), stainless steel, aluminum or wood. For a free brochure and more information on the Lapeyre Stair, Circle 20 on Reader Service Car

  • Quick-Connects with polyethylene seals are now available from Swagelok Quick-Connect Co., Solon, Ohio. This new feature, along with all 316 stainless steel construction, makes the "QT" Series ideal for heavy duty, high pressure and corrosive applications where other seal materials are unacceptable.

  • —Free Literature A v a i l a b l e— Atlas 8630 VTC, a new modular 16-inch Rasterscan radar with integral keyboard facilities specifically designed for vessel traffic control applications, was recently introduced by Krupp Atlas Elektronik. Suitable for either stand-alone operation or installation as

  • —Free Literature Available— A medium-speed diesel engine designed for heavy fuel operation and low fuel oil consumption is an ideal basis for engines with the load profile for naval operations. Such medium-speed engines should be designed for: continuous operation; dependability; excellent economy;

  • MR Jan-20#48 Tech Files
Innovative products, technologies and concepts
Ze)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    Tech Files Innovative products, technologies and concepts Zeabuz Zero Emission Waterbus While Norway ranks 120th among countries globally in terms of population size (5.3 mil- lion), it packs a powerful punch in the maritime world, as Norwegians rank near the top as mari- time and offshore industry

  • MR Jan-20#43  is the latest addition to its 
stainless steel line-up of machines)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    Aussie Atlas Shipyard Ready Pressure Cleaners Australian Pump Industries new Aussie Atlas pressure cleaner is the latest addition to its stainless steel line-up of machines designed for shipyard application. The ? rst order will ? nd the units on permanent hire at Garden Island Dockyard in Sydney Harbor

  • MR Jan-20#14 O?  shore Wind
Q&A: Matt Tremblay, ABS
The Domino Effect)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    O? shore Wind Q&A: Matt Tremblay, ABS The Domino Effect The next hot growth market is offshore wind; Is the U.S. marine industry ready to meet demand? he American Bureau of Shipping convened a conference to discuss the pace and direction of the U.S. offshore wind market, including challenges and opportuni

  • MR Jan-20#7 simple isn)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 7

    simple isn't always easy... But furuno radars are a simple choice Your objective is simple…Deliver your vessel and its contents safely and on time. While it might sound simple, we know it’s not easy! Whether you’re navigating the open ocean, busy harbors, or through congested inland waterways, being aware

  • MN Jan-20#60  
add-on instructions to 
ter stainless steel break tank with)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 60

    the 3N1888 and Jabsco 17360-1001; 250 I/O modules and engine runs at 2,400 rpms. A 60-li- JPR-CT0440 replaces Caterpillar add-on instructions to ter stainless steel break tank with low 4255412, Jabsco 29630-1201 and simplify the integra- water shutdown and 50-liter fuel Perkins W100006; and JPR-CT3054

  • MN Jan-20#58  is 
need to be replaced or maintained, 
fully approved (ABS/USCG))
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 58

    help operators iden- systems and is compatible with off- tify early on which components the-shelf pipe, and the entire line is need to be replaced or maintained, fully approved (ABS/USCG). meaning repairs can be planned in advance and potential damage to components can be avoided. It also extends the service

  • MN Jan-20#33 SAFETY 
tank or from outside – either would warrant an)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 33

    SAFETY tank or from outside – either would warrant an inspec- Headquarters has prioritized outreach and discussion tion to determine the source and a potential limitation vs. an enforcement policy at this time. While this may of movement, up to detention to port.” He pointed out, change with new policy

  • MN Jan-20#19  future ahead for our industry. 
tained. Additionally, Stephens)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 19

    of Guard’s Marine Safety Mission and tomorrow, and I am excited for the ensure that this function is well-main- bright future ahead for our industry. tained. Additionally, Stephens urged Congress to evaluate the implementa- Bob Lawler is currently General Manger tion of the Coast Guard’s action plan

  • MN Jan-20#17  USCG post-casualty interview. 
tain began turning the vessel)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 17

    his cell less than 15 minutes later to the last pair of buoys in the narrow channel and the cap- prepare him for his initial USCG post-casualty interview. tain began turning the vessel to port while maintaining his That initial interview, conducted onboard the disabled speed of just under 25 knots to approach

  • MP Q4-19#51  1. A similar ratio may be maintained  •	 Identify additional)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 51

    tween reported near misses and unreported near misses is arguably c hange efforts; on the order of 5 to 1 or 10 to 1. A similar ratio may be maintained • Identify additional shipboard hazards (space specifc); at each level as one goes from near misses to fatalities. • Assist safety interventions

  • MP Q4-19#47  sulphur cap will bring real sustainable benefts 
Ensuring operationa)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 47

    waste oil to proper cleaning costs later on. of the engine, can create immediate value and peace of mind. The 2020 global sulphur cap will bring real sustainable benefts Ensuring operational effciencies is a quick win for owners and to the shipping industry and society. However, it is critical ship operators

  • MP Q4-19#44 PORT AUTOMATION
CREDIT: Konecranes
Teleoperation:
As the)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 44

    PORT AUTOMATION CREDIT: Konecranes Teleoperation: As the pressures mount to improve effciencies, safety and a port’s environmental footprint, the means to make all of that happen are already within reach. And, contrary to what organized labor might think, it’s not about reducing headcounts. By Amit

  • MP Q4-19#42  to 
Marc holds an MSc in Sustainability Management from)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 42

    our solutions, business models, and scaling processes. sel and barge operators, as well as surveyors. We also intend to Marc holds an MSc in Sustainability Management from Columbia University. 42 Maritime Logistics Professional November/December 2019 |

  • MP Q4-19#41  activities and sign offs by 
contained in the fuel, which upon)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 41

    to it, through- it reaches a vessel, there will be an entirely auditable trail of tags out the supply chain and records all activities and sign offs by contained in the fuel, which upon lab analysis, will reveal the as- actors transacting the fuel. It provides assurance of quality, sociated data regarding

  • MP Q4-19#16 , but in a business where maintaining margins can  dual-fuel)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    air on a vessel can have catastrophic to the ship’s power plant, where it’s used to fuel steam boilers and consequences, but in a business where maintaining margins can dual-fuel marine diesel engines. The LNG boil-off also causes a already present major challenges, ineffciency can have signif- rise

  • MP Q4-19#15 E
n
d
s
l
Driving what appears to be the biggest shake-up)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 15

    E n d s l Driving what appears to be the biggest shake-up to the E y shipping industry in decades, the rules are changing regarding shipping vessel emissions and fuel — and the deadline for compliance is fast-approaching. Onboard equipment: often makes more sense to gener- Often, the switch to LNG power

  • MN Dec-19#47  and integration of  contained shipbuilding facilities)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 47

    for law enforcement, ? re rescue, and Those advantages today are deep. With three fully self- specialty markets. “From the selection and integration of contained shipbuilding facilities in Alabama and Louisi- ? re? ghting systems to the layout of the vessel’s ? re control ana USA plus a dedicated engineering

  • MN Dec-19#39   year in the making process certainly is complicated – per-
still)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 39

    . Con- proposed CBP Modi? cations to Jones Act rulings. This 10- struction is slated for 2022. The promise of offshore wind is year in the making process certainly is complicated – per- still a work in progress. A big part of the domestic offshore haps intentionally. And, as a result, as the New Year edges wind

  • MN Dec-19#35 PROPULSION REGULATIONS
The pilot boat Luna (Port of)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    PROPULSION REGULATIONS The pilot boat Luna (Port of Rotterdam), with twin MAN turbocharged engines, has a top speed in excess of 30 knots. Credit: MAN nies are making Tier 4 engines now. MAN Truck & Bus SE, point is that the Luna and these bigger engines perform Cummins and Caterpillar. All are EMA members.

  • MN Dec-19#23 “… OMSA and its members have continued to engage the USCG)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 23

    “… OMSA and its members have continued to engage the USCG and FEMA in discussions about the industry’s capabilities and the Nation’s response requirements. The impetus behind the effort was hurricane response, but the recommendations can improve the maritime response strategies for any crisis scenario.

  • MR Dec-19#44 MR
Employment                         Select jobs that can)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    MR Employment Select jobs that can be found posted now on www.MaritimeJobs.com Relocation expenses are not authorized for this position. Contact Chief Radio Electronics Technician Military Sealift Command HR Manager Yeoman Storekeeper Salary: $ $64,315 , Full Time , Mid Career Email:

  • MR Dec-19#39 T
TECH FILES
gen: One Step Closer
LNG Power for VW Car)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 39

    T TECH FILES gen: One Step Closer LNG Power for VW Car Carriers will be offered to Havila Kystruten for retro? tting. “We will deliver a system that is safe, that takes up little space, that is easy to retro? t and, of course, that does the job,” said Osnes. The development of the hydrogen system is

  • MR Dec-19#30 GREAT SHIPS OF 2019 A METHANOL FUTURE
“Our experience to)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    GREAT SHIPS OF 2019 A METHANOL FUTURE “Our experience to date has led to what I think is best termed ‘simpli? cation’. For example, the piping arrangements. In the ? rst- generation engines, there were a lot more pipes than you see on your standard engine. In the sec- ond-generation engines, this

  • MR Dec-19#11 “The sector is entering what has been 
dubbed Maritime 4.)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 11

    “The sector is entering what has been dubbed Maritime 4.0, including the emergence of autonomous ships, ‘connected’ ports and harbors, and Photo courtesy Lloyd’s Maritime Academy the growth of alternative fuels and green ship technology. These are devel- opments which have not been around for long and