Sealift Ships Army

  • National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO), a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics, delivered USNS Soderman (T-AKR 317) to the U.S. Navy. The Soderman is the eighth and final new construction ship completed by NASSCO under the U.S. Navy's Strategic Sealift Program.

    The eight newbuilds were completed at NASSCO from 1993 to 2002 under the Navy's 20-ship Strategic Sealift Program. All of the ships were named for U.S. Army Medal of Honor recipients.

    The USNS Soderman was named for Private First Class William A. Soderman, a World War II recipient of the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in Belgium in 1944.

    The sealift new construction ships are large, medium-speed, RoRo ships (LMSRs). The ships are assigned to the U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, and are prepositioned to quickly deliver U.S. Army tanks, armored personnel carriers, tractor-trailers, and other equipment and supplies to potential areas of conflict around the world. The ships also can provide surge sealift support of remote military actions. Their multi-use capabilities make these cargo ships among the most flexible ever built.

    The USNS Soderman is 950 ft. (289.5 m), has a beam of 105 ft. (32 m) and displaces approximately 62,000 long tons when fully loaded. The ship has over 390,000 square feet of cargo carrying space. The gas turbine-powered ship will be able to sustain speeds up to 24 knots when fully loaded.

    The strategic sealift ships are the largest ships that can fit through the Panama Canal.

    NASSCO is building two RoRos for Totem Ocean Trailer Express and has begun construction of the first of four double-hull tankers for BP. Vortmann added that NASSCO has also been awarded contracts to build the first three T-AKEs, a new, innovative class of dry cargo ammunition ships that will meet the Navy's logistics needs for the next 40 years.

  • both in commercial markets and government policies, here and abroad, commercial markets that have previously been relied upon to provide sealift, shipbuilding, and shiprepair assets required to fulfill national security objectives can no longer be relied upon to provide these assets." "

  • Six of the largest and fastest containerships in the U.S.-flag merchant fleet have been purchased by the Navy for use by the Military Sealift Command to enhance the strategic mobility capability of the armed forces. The Naval Sea Systems Command recently awarded a $207.5- million contract for the

  • . Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) announced the lease of their first Theater Support for the Army from Bollinger/Incat USA. Military Sealift Command (MSC), Washington. D.C.. also announced a contract for a 322-ft. (98-m) craft from Bollinger/Incat USA. to support U.S. Navy Mine Warfare Comm

  • nautical miles at loaded displacement. It has a crew of six officers and 24 enlisted personnel. The Army contract was awarded by the Navy's Military Sealift Command and is being administered by the Navy's Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion, and Repair (SUPSHIPS) in Pascagoula, Miss. John Dane

  • The Navy's Military Sealift Command (MSC) has announced that it intends to procure on the open world market during FY 1986 up to six logistic support vehicles (SLV) from one or more offerers. If purchased from a foreign seller, the vessels must be reflagged and all conversion work performed in U.S.

  • The Department of Defense has announced that the Navy's Military Sealift Command, Atlantic, Bayonne, N.J., has awarded a $4,776,000 fixed-price contract to Savannah Machine and Shipyard Company, Savannah, Ga. The contract is for drydocking, a special survey by the American Bureau of Shipping

  • Sealift is essential both to executing this country's forward defense strategy and to maintaining a wartime economy. The United States' national sealift objective is to ensure that sufficient military and civil maritime resources will be available to meet defense deployment, and essential economic

  • The Fast Sealift Ship (FSS) USNS Antares (T-AKR-294) was dedicated in ceremonies held recently at Avondale Shipyards, Inc. near New Orleans, and delivered to the Military Sealift Command about two weeks later. This is the first of three SL-7 containerships that Avondale is converting for the MSC.

  • Dillingham Tug and Barge Corporation (DT&B), Honolulu, Hawaii, has been awarded a government contract by the Military Sealift Command, Washington, D.C., to provide tug and barge service between Honolulu, Johnston Island, and Eniwetok Atoll as part of the United States effort to restore living

  • The Navy's Military Sealift Command has awarded a fixed-price contract totaling $30,709,896 to Bay Tankers, Inc., One Chase Manhattan Plaza, New York, N.Y., for the operation and maintenance of four T-AKR Fast Sealift Ships. Two of the ships will be based in Violet, La., one in Bayonne, N.J., and the

  • The seventh and final Strategic Sealift ship in the Bob Hope Class was christened Benavidez in ceremonies at the Northrop Grumman Corporation Avondale shipyard on July 21, 2001. The new ship whose namesake honors of Medal of Honor recipient Army Master Sgt. Roy P. Benavidez, of Lindenau, Tex. is a

  • MN Jun-19#28 PROPULSION
“T  e approach was to take 
advantage of the)
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    PROPULSION “T e approach was to take advantage of the automotive diesel engine’s inherent high performance, substantially increased life and substantially reduced operational cost and compliance with environmen- tal laws and regulations and combine it into a more reliable drive train suitable for

  • MN Jun-19#22 COLUMN OP/ED
?  re?  ghting is not a pro?  table or)
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    COLUMN OP/ED ? re? ghting is not a pro? table or sustainable venture. For determine that marine ? re? ghting services require dedi- example, to meet the regulatory standards ASA companies cated assets in contrast to vessels of opportunity currently have pre-positioned marine ? re? ghting equipment

  • MN Jun-19#20 COLUMN OP/ED
A Reassessment of the 
U.S. Marine Salvage)
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    COLUMN OP/ED A Reassessment of the U.S. Marine Salvage Posture It has been ten years since the U.S. Salvage and Marine FireÀ ghting Regulations were published: Is it time for a reassessment of the U.S. marine salvage posture? By Jim Elliott In 1982, the National Research Coun- Reassessment of the Marine

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The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic)
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    BY THE NUMBERS The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report on Flag State Control The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report given the millions of lives at stake – in the U.S. ? ag ? eet. contains statistics regarding inspections and enforcement In 2018 there were 40 valid Flag State

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
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    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

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he end of one era typically signals the)
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    EDITOR’S NOTE he end of one era typically signals the start of another. And, so it is with the business of building naval and municipal patrol boats, where the demand for smaller, more agile and T versatile hulls has skyrocketed. At the same time, and as governments everywhere come to the realization

  • MR Jun-19#60  Cruise Lines Email: civmar@sealiftcommand.com Contact
Full)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    found posted now on www.MaritimeJobs.com Employment Contact Norfolk, VA, 23502 USA Marine Mechanic New York Cruise Lines Email: civmar@sealiftcommand.com Contact Full Time , Project Manager Work Phone : 757-341-4610 Email: civmar@sealiftcommand.com Category: Vessel Operations 6353 Center

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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

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    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    You’re invited to meet the leading players ??????????u????????????U?????????????? technology for passenger ships. See what’s possible when innovative suppliers Register now showcase their latest developments for the for your free pass booming cruise and ferry industry. marineinteriors- expo.com/pass ?????

  • MR Jun-19#55 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
NEW MT 603 Series 
Radio)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS NEW MT 603 Series Radio Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two

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PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
Ship IoT Tech: Enabling)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS Ship IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive Approach to Navigation Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA).

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
“The feasibility report showed)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

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TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

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TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
By)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

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under management.  grows in size and establishes)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MarTID 2019 under management. grows in size and establishes many years METIs of data, this will be an important metric METIs globally have historically ‘car- to track. ried the water’ in terms of mariner train- Roughly two-thirds of the respondents ing, for regulatory compliance, licensing do not

  • MR Jun-19#47 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database creased their personal seafarer training The Future is Murky expenditure over the last ? ve years, and While “autonomy” more than 55% expect their personal garners its fair share of head- training expenditures to grow in the up- lines

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#45 world yearbook
system includes the underlying owners)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    world yearbook system includes the underlying owners, vessel opera- ates around 700 vessels at any one time”. Oldendorff tors (sometimes called “freight merchants”) and major Carriers estimated that its controlled ? eet (owned and charterers. On the tanker side, brokers Poten compiles chartered) stood

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its focus on liner cargo and the logistics of de-)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    2019 its focus on liner cargo and the logistics of de- emerging. Three years on, the expanded Cos- TABLE 2 livering boxes, the listed company has recently co completed another merger, acquiring Ori- divested investments in Danish supermarkets, ent Overseas Container Line (OOCL). Unlike THE WORLD’S

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“If consolidation was the solution to all)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    world yearbook “If consolidation was the solution to all that ails shipping, then container liner companies would be super pro? table. They are not. In ‘commoditized’ sectors of the shipping industry, which by now includes pretty much everything apart from very small niche markets, there is hardly any

  • MR Jun-19#42 2019
TOP SHIPOWNERS: 
IS BIGGER BETTER?
Like any other)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

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could be delivered to any one of seven)
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    world yearbook could be delivered to any one of seven Top U.S. Ports cargo in value (in Millions) Top U.S. Ports Cargo (total tons) terminals in the “Los Angeles–Long RankU.S. Port 2018 2017 RankU.S. Port 2018 Tons2017 Tons Beach complex,” which is another way 1 Los Angeles $