Size Subsystem Technology

  • United States spending for ocean ships and their subsystems during 1976-1985 could range from $10 billion to $16.4 billion, depending on the U.S. commitment and world demand, according to "Shipbuilding and Associated Subsystems," a Frost & Sullivan analysis of the industry.

    Aggregate demand for world shipping capacity, minus existing capacity, and the U.S. Government's willingness to press a cargo-preference policy for American shipping are the critical factors in determining the eventual size of the market.

    Assumptions Scenarios A, B and C were formulated to project the extent of the total market and sub-markets, based on funding levels for (a) Construction Differential Subsidy; (b) cargo preference legislation, and (c) Navy shipbuilding dictated by national defense needs.

    Scenario A calculates an increase of 46 percent or 268 ships, representing total new ship construction of $10.1 billion for 1976- 85. Scenario B sees an even larger expansion of 408 new breakbulk and bulk carriers, or outlays of $13.6 billion, and Scenario C is the optimum market of 563 new ships or a total market of $16.4 billion.

    The study believes that Congress will enact cargo-preference legislation in 1977, mandating, among other items, the carrying of 20 to 30 percent of U.S. oil imports in American-built and operated tankers.

    Some of the study's other assumptions are: • World trade will continue to grow at 5 to 10 percent annually, probably closer to the higher figure.

    • The world economy will remain relatively stable.

    • Continued growth in construction of LNG carriers, intermodal and other specialty vessels.

    • Despite long-term U.S. Government policy, there will be a strong trend toward bilateral agreements and cargo preference restrictions, forcing a reexamination of U.S. policy.

    Breakbulk Shipping In breakbulk shipping, the largest dollar market under Scenario A will be the construction of 36 barge carriers for a total of $3.6 billion in 1976-85. There will be more (42) roll-on/roll-off carriers built, but the market value will be $3.1 billion.

    Also in breakbulk, new containership construction is estimated to be $1.5 billion for Scenario A, and general freighter expenditures of $1.3 billion will be concentrated in the 1981-85 period.

    Under Scenarios B and C, the barge carrier category will remain at $3.6 billion, ro/ros also will stay constant, but container carrier shipbuilding will expand to $2.5 billion for option B, and $3.5 billion for C.

    Bulk Carriers In bulk-carrier shipping, liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers will dominate all Scenarios, ranging from $10.8 billion in new construction under A, to nearly $14 billion for the C option. In vessels, the span is 48 to 90.

    In other bulk-carriers, oil tankers, given optimum conditions, could rise from new construction of $562.5 million in Scenario A to $8.2 billion under Scenario C. New tanker construction would range from 237 to 320. Dry cargo carrier estimates are, variously, $2.0 billion, $2.5 billion and $3.0 billion, all in 1981-85.

    Subsystems In the subsystems markets, steel will be the primary segment, with carbon steel plates alone requiring purchasing of $1.2 billion in Scenario A, $1.7 billion in B, and almost $2 billion in the C option. Other carbon steel requirements, including structural, will add substantially to this submarket.

    Alloy steel, aluminum sheet, plate and foil, and copper pipe and tubing present smaller but significant markets of opportunity.

    Purchasing of diesel engines, including semi-diesel, is forecast to be $252 million, $340.4 million and $408.5 million under the respective scenarios. Gasoline engines and carburetors will be a minuscule market in comparison.

    In communication and navigation systems, the Marisat communication system will be the major recipient, with estimated funding ranging from $21.4 million to a high of $45.0 million.

    Satellite, Omega/Decca and Loran navigation systems are expected to be $10.2 million, $15.5 million and $21.6 million under each scenario.

    Conclusions Among a number of conclusions, "Shipbuilding and Associated Subsystems" believes that U.S. shipyards will build an increasingly higher proportion of the 50 to 100 LNG carriers required in 1976-80 because of advancements in cryogenic technology, considerable unused U.S.

    shipyard capacity versus lesser foreign capacity, and economic trends favoring the U.S.

    For further information, contact Customer Service, Frost & Sullivan, Inc., 106 Fulton Street, New York, N.Y. 10038, Reference Report #405.

  • and LIDAR.   Performance requirements are defined at the subsystem or component level. Examples include: detection and classification (by type and size) of objects within a certain time frame and distance required to give sufficient time to react; execution of collision regulations based on type

  • that could be detrimental to the delivery and operational availability of the Knifefish program if left to the later program phases. “Overcoming unique size, weight and power challenges are keystones to the successful deployment of the Navy’s Knifefish program,” said Tom Mason, senior program manager of

  • Sanders Associates, Inc., has been awarded a $10-million subcontract by Sperry Systems Management, Great Neck, N.Y., to provide Auxiliary Display Terminal (ADT) equipment for the U.S. Navy's Trident II navigation subsystem development program. ' The ADT's will provide the keyboard entry and display

  • A $321,607 contract has been awarded to the French firm of Thomson-CSF, Inc. by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce, for a 20- month exploratory program to develop a shipboard Current/ Depth Measuring Subsystem. The subsystem will measure subsurfac

  • A new version of its Engine Room Simulator was introduced by Transas Marine at the beginning of November 2000. The Transas ERS 2000/3000 ver.5.3 features improvements to its functionality including enhanced modeling of the Steering Gear and of the interaction between Ship Diesel Propulsion plant

  • , the structure module predicts the structural loads and, based upon the selected material properties and starting with a minimum plating gauge, it sizes the hull plating and structural scantlings to resist the predicted seaway loads and then sums up the structure weights. The resistance module then

  • Tracor, Inc., Austin, Texas, has received a multi-year contract from the Naval Supply Center, Norfolk, Va., for engineering, analytical, and technical support as required by the NAVSEA Combat System Engineering Station in Norfolk for the AN/SQQ-89 (V) Underwater Sensor System, the Anti-Submarine Warf

  • Analysis & Technology, Inc. (A&T) of North Stonington, Conn., has won contract awards from the U.S. Navy totaling $18.6 million, bringing their total backlog to a present record high of $95 million, according to company president and chief executive officer A.T. Mollegen Jr. A three-year contract

  • Surrounded by some of the world’s most productive seas, the U.K. generates more electricity from offshore wind than any other country. Developments over the last 12 months suggest a promising future for the U.K.’s leading green energy sector. In 2016, capital spending commitment reached recorded levels

  • Sperry Corporation has announced the development of a high accuracy, deepwater integrated navigation system for use aboard seismic exploration vessels, and is now offering this system to potential users of such equipment. Free literature is now available from Sperry completely describing the new

  • The American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) in cooperation with the Surface Navy Association (SNA) and the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Miss., will sponsor a symposium in Biloxi, Miss., September 27-29,1990, at the Mississippi Gulf Coast Coliseum. The symposium is titled "Destroyer

  • MN Jun-19#28  enough to ap-
mance and tank size the OXE Diesel  twin installatio)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    Of cer for Cimco net result is that for the same perfor- the petrol equivalent. “We’ve got a compliant and versatile enough to ap- mance and tank size the OXE Diesel twin installation on a 10 meter Chee- peal to the needs of commercial, gov- four-stroke offers 70 percent more range. tah cat,” says

  • MN Jun-19#26  is an outboard unit of similar size and 
Alternator output:350)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    D 975 No.1 lined engine design reduces fuel consumption by up to 42 Weight:No.2. JIS KK2204, F54 & F75 percent. The result is an outboard unit of similar size and Alternator output:350 kg dimensions to conventional two- or four-stroke petrol out- Rig length:130 Amp board for the same power output that is

  • MN Jun-19#25 PROPULSION
that when you lift the soundproof cowl, 
everythi)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 25

    PROPULSION that when you lift the soundproof cowl, everything is easily accessible. CIMCO also designed a similar mounting pat- tern as a Yamaha 200hp outboard; the prop uses the same spline and shaft. As Pim Polesie, the Chief Marketing Credit: OXE Of? cer for Cimco, explained, “The ap- proach was to

  • MN Jun-19#24 PROPULSION
T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
Credit:)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#16  more 
than one standard size for the engine? If so,)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    such vessels due to the dif? culty to access South America as well as the Caribbean. Do you anticipate any move towards offering more than one standard size for the engine? If so, why and for what new target market? The CXO300 is the ? rst in a series of high-powered per- formance diesel outboards to be

  • MN Jun-19#14  of  weight and package size compared to conventional)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    in April 2015. He military and civil applications, offering a signi? cantly reduced holds an EMBA in Business from the University of weight and package size compared to conventional diesel in- JChicago, a Master’s Degree in Marine Surveying board engines. Not only does it offer the torque and fuel ef- and

  • MN Jun-19#10  are near-
July of 2018, the size of the U.S. inspected )
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    performance record. started getting inspected under 46 CFR Subchapter M in Finally, the Coast Guard estimates (?) that there are near- July of 2018, the size of the U.S. inspected ? eet grew by ly 58,000 commercial ? shing vessels in domestic service. approximately 6,500 vessels to a total ? eet size

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

  • MR Jun-19#61 MR
                                          
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC.GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition Naval Architects ? Naval Architecture Services and Marine Engineers ? Marine Engineering

  • MR Jun-19#58 This directory section is an editorial feature published)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Jun-19#57 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’  Marine Equipment)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

  • MR Jun-19#56 You’re invited to meet the leading players 
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    You’re invited to meet the leading players ??????????u????????????U?????????????? technology for passenger ships. See what’s possible when innovative suppliers Register now showcase their latest developments for the for your free pass booming cruise and ferry industry. marineinteriors- expo.com/pass ?????

  • MR Jun-19#55 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
NEW MT 603 Series 
Radio)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS NEW MT 603 Series Radio Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two

  • MR Jun-19#54 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
Ship IoT Tech: Enabling)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS Ship IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive Approach to Navigation Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA).

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
“The feasibility report showed)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

  • MR Jun-19#51 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

  • MR Jun-19#50 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
By)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

  • MR Jun-19#49 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

  • MR Jun-19#48  management.  grows in size and establishes many years)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MarTID 2019 under management. grows in size and establishes many years METIs of data, this will be an important metric METIs globally have historically ‘car- to track. ried the water’ in terms of mariner train- Roughly two-thirds of the respondents ing, for regulatory compliance, licensing do not

  • MR Jun-19#47 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database creased their personal seafarer training The Future is Murky expenditure over the last ? ve years, and While “autonomy” more than 55% expect their personal garners its fair share of head- training expenditures to grow in the up- lines

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#42  owners to even larger entity size in  come in and out of)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    may … an easier company for investors to Cosco Shipping, both of which have try, which by now includes pretty much force owners to even larger entity size in come in and out of.” weighty presences, in terms of sheer ves- everything apart from very small niche order to command attention and main- Both

  • MR Jun-19#41 world yearbook
could be delivered to any one of seven)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    world yearbook could be delivered to any one of seven Top U.S. Ports cargo in value (in Millions) Top U.S. Ports Cargo (total tons) terminals in the “Los Angeles–Long RankU.S. Port 2018 2017 RankU.S. Port 2018 Tons2017 Tons Beach complex,” which is another way 1 Los Angeles $

  • MR Jun-19#29 world yearbook
FERRY FIRST
Alabama’s Gee’s Bend Ferry)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    world yearbook FERRY FIRST Alabama’s Gee’s Bend Ferry re- cently entered service after being converted from geared-diesel to Images courtesy Glosten/ALDOT become the ? rst zero-emission, New ATB for VANE electric-powered passenger/car In 2018, Vane Brothers took deliv- ferry in the U.S. Owned by the