Bureau Of Standards

  • The U.S. Government is assisting an industry-sponsored program to study and test models of ocean platforms shaped like giant concrete bubbles, each capable of holding enough fuel for 500,000 cars on a crosscountry trip.

    These unique vessels, called Tuned Spheres, will be located 15 to 40 miles off the U.S.

    coastline to serve as deepwater terminals for the biggest supertankers afloat. At present, no U.S. port can accommodate these supertankers.

    This means that imported crude oil now must be unloaded from supertankers in deepwater Caribbean and Canadian ports, and then transshipped to the United States, using small tankers. Transshipping is said to cost gasoline and heating oil users in this country an additional $1 billion annually, which contributes to unfavorable U.S. balance of trade.

    For this key reason, Tuned Sphere International, Inc., One Pine Street, Nashua, N.H., was awarded a grant by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to test the feasibility of Tuned Spheres in the role of offshore terminal facilities. Tuned Sphere International, headquartered in Nashua, N.H., is a subsidiary of Energy Systems Corporation, the parent organization that employs recondite technology to create advanced products for industry and people.

    Federal grants totaling more than $200,000 will be used to demonstrate Tuned Sphere stability under the roughest sea conditions.

    Model-test monies also complement contracts received in the past six months from ERDA and Lockheed Missiles and Space Company to investigate feasibility of the Tuned Sphere as the platform for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion powerplants under development by ERDA. These powerplants will convert temperature differences in ocean currents into electric power, or will manufacture at sea, useful products such as anhydrous ammonia fertilizers.

    Interest in Tuned Spheres, according to Kenneth E. Mayo, president of Energy Systems, is being spurred by a highly favorable National Bureau of Standards technical review completed last May.

    George P. Lewett, a National Bureau of Standards (NBS) official, finds Tuned Spheres "technically valid and worthy of consideration for appropriate government support." Tuned Spheres, reports NBS, "offer improved stability over the full range of weather conditions encountered on open oceans for unloading, storing, and pumping petroleum; for oil-well drilling, and as a platform for ocean-based wind, geothermal, or other powerplants." The National Bureau of Standards report notes that the Tuned Sphere's unusual shape "provides greater strength and distributes forces due to wave action." Stability of the sphere in heavy seas is made possible, the report adds, "by locating the center of mass well below the center of buoyancy. This may be changed by pumping water ballast from one tank to another." "Symmetry of Tuned Spheres eliminates pitch . . . and yaw." Neither does the oversized ball heave much in the water. "This is reduced," the report says, "by means of a large quiescent pool of water located inside the sphere. This pool is open at the bottom so that its level is adjusted automatically to average wave heights." With the forces of natural hazards and waves effectively countered, Tuned Spheres are expected to give stability over the full range of open ocean conditions, superior to that of any other vessel design.

    Designed as bulk petroleum terminals, Tuned Spheres will have a 380-foot diameter to permit storage capacity of four million barrels of crude. Stored crude oil is pumped to shore via at-sea terminus of a subsea crude pipeline. Receiving facilities may be located as much as 25 miles inland.

    In sum, the National Bureau of Standards says Tuned Spheres will (1) improve safety of vessels, hence personnel, (2) reduce transportation cost of oil, (3) reduce danger of oil spills, and (4) improve productivity during bad weather and sea condition.

    The report also concludes that Tuned Spheres may assist relief of the nation's energy problems, because they "enhance production in offshore drilling . . . and as offshore terminals for receiving imported crude oil and petroleum products at a decrease in import costs." Charles R. Fink, vice president for operations of Tuned Sphere International, notes that "The potential $l-billion transportation cost savings to derive from Tuned Sphere deepwater terminals more than offset the cost increase which will result if legislation to require import of up to 10 percent of foreign crude in U.S.-flag vessels is passed by the Congress."

  • d m i n i s t r a t i o n ; Gerald Chapman and Donald Oberacker of the Environmental Protection Agency; Rosalie Matthews of the National Bureau of Standards, and Fritz Wybenga of the Coast Guard. John Nachtsheim, president of the Society, delivered an introductory statement for the panel of

  • , N.Y., facility on a Marine Pax tester, designed and built by Bailey. The test included capacity verification, using National Bureau of Standards certified thermometers and flow meters, and sound level monitoring, with NBS-certified sound level metering. The Marine Pax tester was

  • Ship Program was prepared by a group established in February this year. In addition to MarAd and EPA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Bureau of Standards participated. A 1978 study indicated that at-sea incineration would be less than half as costly as land-based incineration. EPA and

  • waters at 1-500 parts per billion concentration levels. Known as the Chlortect chlorine monitor, their instrument was developed at the National Bureau of Standards and is the result of an increasing need to monitor chlorine residuals, on site, with high sensitivity and reliability. The technology

  • commodities could bear while returning a profit to the U.S.-flag carriers. In a related study for the Federal Railroad Administration and the National Bureau of Standards, Manalytics is examining the domestic perishables logistics system. "At this time, there is no definitive information on the potential de

  • and safety standards of the U.S. Coast Guard, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Maritime Administration, and the National Bureau of Standards, among others, and are the first of their kind to meet the criteria of the American Bureau of Shipping. The Apollo One can safely

  • . This committee is comprised of representatives from the Naval Sea Systems Command together with representatives from Navy laboratories, National Bureau of Standards, the Office of Naval Research, and the Naval Academy. SEAHAC is responsible for making specific recommendations regarding the technical

  • Eleven maritime executives from three countries were elected members of the American Bureau of Shipping at the annual meeting of the Society held in New York City on March 15. This brings to 380 the number of ABS members. The new members are: John Alioto, president, Pacific Far East Line, Inc.

  • George P. Livanos, president of Seres Shipping, Inc., New York, N.Y., was elected to the Management Committee of the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) by the board of managers at its recent Semiannual Meeting. Announcement of his election was made by Robert T. Young, chairman of the board of ABS.

  • Kenneth E. Sheehan has been appointed counsel to the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) and its subsidiaries, it was announced by Robert T. Young, chairman and president of the international ship classification society. Mr. Sheehan will provide inhouse counsel on legal matters concerning the

  • The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has been authorized to act as a "Certified Verification Agent" by the Geological Survey of the United States Department of the Interior to ensure that offshore fixed platforms and other structures meet federal standards. The standards apply to fixed structures de

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Bureau of Shipping (ABS).   levels)
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  • MR Nov-18#86  type approved by the American Bureau 
of Shipping, DNV GL,)
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Fouling has been a)
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AET (formerly American Eagle Tank- ter)
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  • MR Nov-18#32 Joseph Farrell, III, Resolve Marine
oices
doesn’t work as)
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Of?  cer, American Bureau of Shipping 
Vision
(ABS))
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LEGAL BEAT
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Congressional and)
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Forward 
Facing 
About the Author
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    The Forward Facing About the Author Dennis L. Bryant is with Bryant’s Mari- GOVERNMENT UPDATE time Consulting, and a regular contribu- tor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering Coast News as well as online at MaritimePro- fessional.com. t: 1 352 692 5493 e: dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com Guard The U.S.

  • MR Nov-18#4  Of? cer at the Ameri-
can Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Milne
SUBSCRI)
    November 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    is a regular contributor to Maritime Re- Fireman porter and Marine Technology Howard Fireman is the Chief Reporter. Digital Of? cer at the Ameri- can Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Milne SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Danielle Milne graduated In U.S.: Fireman from Strathclyde Univer- One full year (12 issues) $110

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  • MN Nov-18#85 must be detailed in a written control 
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