Bureau Of Standards

  • The U.S. Government is assisting an industry-sponsored program to study and test models of ocean platforms shaped like giant concrete bubbles, each capable of holding enough fuel for 500,000 cars on a crosscountry trip.

    These unique vessels, called Tuned Spheres, will be located 15 to 40 miles off the U.S.

    coastline to serve as deepwater terminals for the biggest supertankers afloat. At present, no U.S. port can accommodate these supertankers.

    This means that imported crude oil now must be unloaded from supertankers in deepwater Caribbean and Canadian ports, and then transshipped to the United States, using small tankers. Transshipping is said to cost gasoline and heating oil users in this country an additional $1 billion annually, which contributes to unfavorable U.S. balance of trade.

    For this key reason, Tuned Sphere International, Inc., One Pine Street, Nashua, N.H., was awarded a grant by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to test the feasibility of Tuned Spheres in the role of offshore terminal facilities. Tuned Sphere International, headquartered in Nashua, N.H., is a subsidiary of Energy Systems Corporation, the parent organization that employs recondite technology to create advanced products for industry and people.

    Federal grants totaling more than $200,000 will be used to demonstrate Tuned Sphere stability under the roughest sea conditions.

    Model-test monies also complement contracts received in the past six months from ERDA and Lockheed Missiles and Space Company to investigate feasibility of the Tuned Sphere as the platform for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion powerplants under development by ERDA. These powerplants will convert temperature differences in ocean currents into electric power, or will manufacture at sea, useful products such as anhydrous ammonia fertilizers.

    Interest in Tuned Spheres, according to Kenneth E. Mayo, president of Energy Systems, is being spurred by a highly favorable National Bureau of Standards technical review completed last May.

    George P. Lewett, a National Bureau of Standards (NBS) official, finds Tuned Spheres "technically valid and worthy of consideration for appropriate government support." Tuned Spheres, reports NBS, "offer improved stability over the full range of weather conditions encountered on open oceans for unloading, storing, and pumping petroleum; for oil-well drilling, and as a platform for ocean-based wind, geothermal, or other powerplants." The National Bureau of Standards report notes that the Tuned Sphere's unusual shape "provides greater strength and distributes forces due to wave action." Stability of the sphere in heavy seas is made possible, the report adds, "by locating the center of mass well below the center of buoyancy. This may be changed by pumping water ballast from one tank to another." "Symmetry of Tuned Spheres eliminates pitch . . . and yaw." Neither does the oversized ball heave much in the water. "This is reduced," the report says, "by means of a large quiescent pool of water located inside the sphere. This pool is open at the bottom so that its level is adjusted automatically to average wave heights." With the forces of natural hazards and waves effectively countered, Tuned Spheres are expected to give stability over the full range of open ocean conditions, superior to that of any other vessel design.

    Designed as bulk petroleum terminals, Tuned Spheres will have a 380-foot diameter to permit storage capacity of four million barrels of crude. Stored crude oil is pumped to shore via at-sea terminus of a subsea crude pipeline. Receiving facilities may be located as much as 25 miles inland.

    In sum, the National Bureau of Standards says Tuned Spheres will (1) improve safety of vessels, hence personnel, (2) reduce transportation cost of oil, (3) reduce danger of oil spills, and (4) improve productivity during bad weather and sea condition.

    The report also concludes that Tuned Spheres may assist relief of the nation's energy problems, because they "enhance production in offshore drilling . . . and as offshore terminals for receiving imported crude oil and petroleum products at a decrease in import costs." Charles R. Fink, vice president for operations of Tuned Sphere International, notes that "The potential $l-billion transportation cost savings to derive from Tuned Sphere deepwater terminals more than offset the cost increase which will result if legislation to require import of up to 10 percent of foreign crude in U.S.-flag vessels is passed by the Congress."

  • d m i n i s t r a t i o n ; Gerald Chapman and Donald Oberacker of the Environmental Protection Agency; Rosalie Matthews of the National Bureau of Standards, and Fritz Wybenga of the Coast Guard. John Nachtsheim, president of the Society, delivered an introductory statement for the panel of

  • , N.Y., facility on a Marine Pax tester, designed and built by Bailey. The test included capacity verification, using National Bureau of Standards certified thermometers and flow meters, and sound level monitoring, with NBS-certified sound level metering. The Marine Pax tester was

  • Ship Program was prepared by a group established in February this year. In addition to MarAd and EPA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Bureau of Standards participated. A 1978 study indicated that at-sea incineration would be less than half as costly as land-based incineration. EPA and

  • waters at 1-500 parts per billion concentration levels. Known as the Chlortect chlorine monitor, their instrument was developed at the National Bureau of Standards and is the result of an increasing need to monitor chlorine residuals, on site, with high sensitivity and reliability. The technology

  • commodities could bear while returning a profit to the U.S.-flag carriers. In a related study for the Federal Railroad Administration and the National Bureau of Standards, Manalytics is examining the domestic perishables logistics system. "At this time, there is no definitive information on the potential de

  • and safety standards of the U.S. Coast Guard, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Maritime Administration, and the National Bureau of Standards, among others, and are the first of their kind to meet the criteria of the American Bureau of Shipping. The Apollo One can safely

  • . This committee is comprised of representatives from the Naval Sea Systems Command together with representatives from Navy laboratories, National Bureau of Standards, the Office of Naval Research, and the Naval Academy. SEAHAC is responsible for making specific recommendations regarding the technical

  • Eleven maritime executives from three countries were elected members of the American Bureau of Shipping at the annual meeting of the Society held in New York City on March 15. This brings to 380 the number of ABS members. The new members are: John Alioto, president, Pacific Far East Line, Inc.

  • George P. Livanos, president of Seres Shipping, Inc., New York, N.Y., was elected to the Management Committee of the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) by the board of managers at its recent Semiannual Meeting. Announcement of his election was made by Robert T. Young, chairman of the board of ABS.

  • Kenneth E. Sheehan has been appointed counsel to the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) and its subsidiaries, it was announced by Robert T. Young, chairman and president of the international ship classification society. Mr. Sheehan will provide inhouse counsel on legal matters concerning the

  • The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has been authorized to act as a "Certified Verification Agent" by the Geological Survey of the United States Department of the Interior to ensure that offshore fixed platforms and other structures meet federal standards. The standards apply to fixed structures de

  • MT Sep-18#56 New Tech
Olis:
Manipulator Control System
Blue Robotics
OSIL)
    September 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    New Tech Olis: Manipulator Control System Blue Robotics OSIL: New ROV Tools Diamond Wire Saw Olis OSIL ROVQUIP piloting. Olis ES1 will be available in Manipulator Control System Blue Robotics Gripper Olis (formerly BluHaptics) says its new mid-September 2018 and functions with Blue Robotics’ new Newton

  • MR Sep-18#48 MARINE SALVAGE
Avoid Headaches & Pitfalls
Response Services)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MARINE SALVAGE Avoid Headaches & Pitfalls Response Services & Non-Tank Vessel Response Plans The summer of Sub M may be over, sic background on why tugboats and operators should currently evaluate 1. Geographic Limitations: but the heat remains for the tugboat towing vessels have been required within

  • MR Sep-18#37 The Slow Boat to 
Cyber  Security
Ports are making up for)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    The Slow Boat to Cyber Security Ports are making up for lost time BY PATRICIA KEEFE Despite the critical role the maritime transporta- both maritime security plans required by law, and tion. Years have also been spent publishing cy- tion system plays in the economic health of the regulation generally

  • MR Sep-18#36  before go- • The American Bureau of Shipping 
ticipating)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    network keeps satel- working on all that plus some are par- program covers assessing and reducing lite traf? c off the internet before go- • The American Bureau of Shipping ticipating in Area Maritime Security risks of a cyber incident, as well as how ing through edge security devices at unveiled methodology

  • MR Sep-18#30  by the Institute 
ation by Bureau Veritas, it was accred-)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    , following an evalu- sector of international recognition and di- vering Simulator - SIMNAV - was de- capital. It is administered by the Institute ation by Bureau Veritas, it was accred- rectly accredited by the major Maritime veloped by ICN in 2011 as an aid to the of Nautical Sciences (ICN) and offers ited

  • MR Sep-18#27 being developed for generating electric- technology from)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    being developed for generating electric- technology from an environmental point software for ? ve new vessels for Genting quality, safety, productivity and customer ity from waste heat and for the cooling of view. Group cruise operators Crystal Cruises pro? t. In a fascinating session, company of

  • MR Sep-18#25 The Internet of Things for the German company. The vessels)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    The Internet of Things for the German company. The vessels weight of about 16,000 tons, a length of standard facilities, including a water An initial ‘port of call’ was the local are specially designed for cruises in po- about 139 meters and width of 22 meters sports marina and modern spa and ?

  • MR Sep-18#21 About the Author
Luca Tommasi is Project Manager at ITF)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 21

    About the Author Luca Tommasi is Project Manager at ITF Seafarers’ Trust do have an impact on their overall wellbeing. One aspects of working at sea. Equally, the discipline of the key issues highlighted and well publicized is of crew management today brings in a range of fatigue, resulting from seafarers

  • MR Sep-18#20 MARINER WELFARE
Maritime Welfare Training ...
 ... More)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    MARINER WELFARE Maritime Welfare Training ... ... More Important than Ever The shipping industry is facing un- way to go. True, that there are model without the dedication, commitment, ports, endless inspections, and mini- precedented change. With topics such owners and operators within the indus- and

  • MR Sep-18#18 LEGAL
MARINE FUELS & LUBES
Why opt for 
Arbitration 
Low)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    LEGAL MARINE FUELS & LUBES Why opt for Arbitration Low Sulphur Fuel in maritime? Organizing Arbitration in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has been evolving for over four decades. Initially, each Emir- ate had its own set of arbitration rules. This changed in 1992 when the government of the UAE issued

  • MR Sep-18#17  the process minimizes the 
Bureau of Shipping, Mil-STD 2197(SH))
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 17

    founded by SIFCO tive plating can be mechanized or fully-auto- ASC. Carrying approvals from the American mated. Mechanizing the process minimizes the Bureau of Shipping, Mil-STD 2197(SH) and direct contact the operator has with the tooling NAVSEA, the process uses signi? cantly smaller and chemicals

  • MR Sep-18#15  Accident Investigation Bureau  prevented the incident)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    .K.’s if necessary, what actions would have The electronic chart displays the ves- sel. Software used for the reconstruc- Maritime Accident Investigation Bureau prevented the incident.” sel’s ‘real-time’ position, course and tion of an incident of the ‘black box’ and and the U.S. National Transport Safety

  • MR Sep-18#11  guidance to federal  The Bureau of Safety and Environmen-)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 11

    industry survey programs. The aggregated data can be used to re- self-imposed limits on use of that infor- (OMB) has published guidance to federal The Bureau of Safety and Environmen- duce the risk of major events, including mation. They conceded that they had not agencies on implementation of CIPSEA

  • MR Sep-18#9 Blowin’ in the Wind: Five Misconceptions of Wind Propulsion)
    September 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 9

    Blowin’ in the Wind: Five Misconceptions of Wind Propulsion on Ships As the collective maritime industry More Training: Some of the smaller, weather analysis, routing and other op- manufacture and installation will come struggles to ? nd a future proof propul- more traditional sailing rigs do need

  • MN Sep-18#44 WORKBOAT MAINTENANCE
“… the rates of biofouling accumulation)
    September 2018 - Marine News page: 44

    WORKBOAT MAINTENANCE “… the rates of biofouling accumulation vary considerably, depending on the suitability, age and physical condition of the coating system(s) applied to the hull, the voyaging, anchoring and lay up patterns of the ship, and the geographical regions where these take place.” Credit:

  • MN Sep-18#37  Department of the 
Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management)
    September 2018 - Marine News page: 37

    . That process is underway in the Great Lakes; it has already happened off of New Eng- land. To that end, and last April, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) published a ‘Call for Information and Nominations.’ This ‘Call’ started a formal process for BOEM to gather in- formation

  • MN Sep-18#26 COLUMN FINANCE
Apples and Oranges 
When it Comes to Vessel)
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    COLUMN FINANCE Apples and Oranges When it Comes to Vessel Finance Companies, lenders, and their auditors worldwide need vessel appraisals that can be relied upon when put into legal documents. As the offshore energy support markets awaken, this is more important now, than ever. By Norman Laskay While a

  • MN Sep-18#25  rather increase risk, the Bureau of Safety  Montco Offshore)
    September 2018 - Marine News page: 25

    rule included provisions that did not increase traditionally involved in offshore oil and gas work, including safety, but would rather increase risk, the Bureau of Safety Montco Offshore and Gulf Island Fabrication, proving that & Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) issued an amended offshore oil and gas and

  • MN Sep-18#24  are currently on hold as the Bureau 
include 90% of the U)
    September 2018 - Marine News page: 24

    Administration in 2016. Implementation of ing the offshore areas open to oil and gas exploration to the new requirements are currently on hold as the Bureau include 90% of the U.S. outer continental shelf (OCS). of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) works on pro- The proposal includes 47 lease sales between

  • MT Jul-18#73 AXSUB
Rimouski, QC, Canada
www.axsub.com
CEO/President:)
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    AXSUB Rimouski, QC, Canada www.axsub.com CEO/President: Eric Gaudreau The AXSUB team has designed several types of monitor- ing systems for the underwater and hyperbaric industry. AX- SUB manufactures diving equipment such as digital video recorders, low voltage LED lamps, underwater cameras and electronic

  • MT Jul-18#66 MTR 10 0
OSIL
OSIL offer a wide range of adapt-
able)
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    MTR 10 0 OSIL OSIL offer a wide range of adapt- able products to both commercial and academic sectors. Instrumented Data Buoys and standalone plat- forms can be equipped with multiple sensors to monitor a wide variety of water quality and metocean pa- rameters, or can incorporate a new piece of developin

  • MT Jul-18#61 its engineering and manufacturing ca- Ocean Sonics manufactu)
    July 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 61

    its engineering and manufacturing ca- Ocean Sonics manufactures the icLis- pabilities. Recent proofs of Novacavi ten Smart Hydrophone, an innovative long term commitment and expertise in passive acoustic monitoring system. designing and providing custom cables Ocean Sonics combines smart electron- to

  • MT Jul-18#59 ence, and technology talents together. 
DOER operates as a)
    July 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 59

    ence, and technology talents together. DOER operates as a B Corp and collab- orates with a number of NGOs and insti- tutions. The company works on projects ranging from subterranean infrastruc- ture to coastal restoration to full ocean depth submersibles. While the company is primarily project based

  • MT Jul-18#56 MTR 10 0
Advanced Navigation Applied Acoustics
Sydney)
    July 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    MTR 10 0 Advanced Navigation Applied Acoustics Sydney, Australia Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK www.advancednavigation.com.au/ www.appliedacoustics.com CEO/President: Chris Shaw / Xavier Orr CEO/President: Adam Darlin g Advanced Navigation is a privately Applied Acoustics was founded in Martin Charles owned