Recent Business Reports On Us Navy

  • NAVY TO SPEND $5.9 BILLION OVER NEXT TWO FISCAL YEARS IMA has recently published the 17th in a series of business reports on U.S. Navy ship maintenance and modernization. These reports detail future ship maintenance plans and examine the impact of scheduled changes on the industry workload.

    Excerpts from the latest report are provided in this article.

    Planned Job Starts The U.S. Navy plans to spend $3.4 billion on ship depot maintenance in Fiscal Year 1990 and $2.5 billion in Fiscal Year 1991. Analysis of the most recent maintenance plan indicates the Navy has scheduled 17 percent fewer ship maintenance jobs in FY 1991 as a result of budget pressures and ship retirements.

    Exhibit 1 shows the number of scheduled Navy ship maintenance job starts planned for FY 1990 and 1991. As shown, the Navy has scheduled 234 ship maintenance availabilities in FY 1990 and 194 availabilities in FY 1991. Importantly, 11 fewer overhauls and other major job starts are scheduled in FY 1991— work which is generally bid coastwise.

    Geographical Distribution Of Future Work The total number of short duration jobs (i.e., less than six months) over the FY 1990-91 period will be divided roughly 50/50 between the East and West Coasts. The East Coast is expected to perform 186 short term availabilities over the two-year period, while the West Coast is scheduled to handle 187. A somewhat larger number of major availabilities will be performed on the East Coast over the two-year period. The East Coast is scheduled to perform 29 major jobs, while the West Coast is scheduled to handle 26.

    However, cuts in FY 1991 will have an unbalanced geographical impact. As indicated in Exhibit 1, overhauls and other major ship repair jobs next year will be reduced by 39 percent on the East Coast, 27 percent on the West Coast. The number of short duration jobs will fall by 17 percent on the East Coast, 12 percent on the West Coast. Importantly, work requiring drydocking will fall 32 percent on the West Coast, 10 percent on the East Coast.

    Homeport Restricted Work An important consideration is the extent to which future work will be restricted to homeport area shipyards.

    The Navy generally restricts depot maintenance which can be completed within six months to shipyards in the homeport area.

    Yards outside the homeport area are not invited to bid for the contract.

    IMA's analysis indicates that the number of homeport restricted jobs requiring drydocking will fall 54 percent in the San Diego area. Short term scheduled drydockings in Pearl Harbor will fall 50 percent.

    However, in contrast, homeport restricted scheduled drydockings will grow 10 percent in Norfolk, 17 percent in Charleston and 20 percent in Mayport.

    Ship Retirements As a result of the ongoing DOD review of defense requirements, the Navy active fleet will be substantially downsized over the next several years. According to recent reports, DOD plans to reduce the number of aircraft carriers from 14 to 12—and reduce the size of the Navy deployable forces from 542 to 488 ships over the next five years.

    Included in this reduction is the retirement of FF 1052 Class of frigates, 46 ships in all.

    Exhibit 2 lists ship activations and retirements planned for FY 1990 and FY 1991. Additional retirements could take place in FY 1991 due to budget pressures. Particularly noteworthy are the planned retirements of two relative- ly modern attack submarines. The Navy, in 1991, plans to retire the 24- year-old Queenfish and 21-year-old Sea Devil. These submarines normally have a 30-year operating life.

    IMA can provide an analysis of the future Navy ship repair market tailored to your specific requirements.

    IMA has been tracking this business sector for 14 years—and has a unique capability to identify likely developments and assess their impact on a company's business base.

    IMA's full 50-page July report on U.S. Navy ship maintenance and modernization is available for $200 and can be ordered by contacting IMA Associates, 2600 Virginia Avenue, N.W., Suite 901, Washington, D.C. 20037; telephone: (202) 333- 8501.

  • Tempo Budget pressures are affecting Navy ship procurement plans. Fewer ships are proposed to be built or converted over the next five years than in recent plans. Navy last year proposed a five-year plan to build or convert 133 ships. The plan submitted to Congress two years ago (FY 1985) proposed

  • continues to be the major source of business for shipyards and marine equipment manufacturers in the United States. This article is an excerpt from recent IMA quarterly business reports on Navy shipbuilding and repair. Navy Shipbuilding The Navy plans to build 90 ships and perform three major modification

  • opportunities available to shipyards, manufacturers, engineering firms and other marine suppliers. This article is based on information contained in recent reports. Overview The U.S. Navy is the major generator of work for shipyards and marine equipment manufacturers in this country. Total spending

  • A totally new report has been completed by IMA. It is a thoroughly professional assessment of future U.S. Navy procurement. The report is designed to assist U.S. and foreign firms interested in selling to the $40-billion-per-year U.S. Navy market. The 220-page report will be useful to business

  • its services IMA regularly publishes special market surveys. Each survey provides a comprehensive review of a subject with wide, current interest. Two recent surveys have dealt with the U.S. Navy shipbuilding and ship repair markets. Great expansion in these markets over the past several years has generated

  • The Navy has clearly become the dominant source of ship repair, as well as new ship construction in the United' States. Ten years ago Navy business accounted for 36 percent of ship repair employment and 58 percent of new ship construction employment in U.S. shipyards. The figures are now 78 percent

  • Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. 20037; telex: 64325 IMA; telefax: (202) 333-8504. Bath Launches Aegis Cruiser Monterey Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, recently launched the U.S. Navy Aegis guided missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG-61) at ceremonies at the shipyard. She is the fourth Aegis cruiser launched

  • contracts for construction and conversion of all 32 ships authorized in its ship construction and sealift charter programs. It was the first time in recent history, and perhaps ever, that all ships authorized in a given year were under contract before the end of that year. Moreover, as Assistant Secretary

  • the North American cruise trade. Market projections call for a tripling of cruise passenger travel during the coming decade. One industry analyst recently predicted that 150,000 to 200,000 new cruise ship berths will be required during the 1990s to satisfy increasing demand. Construction of these new

  • per year during this period. Average modernization expenditure has increased from $.9 million to $2.5 million per ship/year. Budget pressures have recently created a buildup in deferred maintenance. The clearest evidence is the decline in maintenance and modernization expenditure per ship over the

  • Each quarter IMA prepares an update on developments in the Navy ship maintenance and modernization market. This article is an excerpt from the most recent update prepared exclusively for publication only in Maritime Reporter. FY 1987 Budget Request The President's budget requests $6.4 billion for

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    P PRODUCTS HEAVY LIFT & DECK MACHINERY timated 390 tons and reach of more than optional 670 HP (500 kW) electric drive Sennebogen SENNEBOGEN will deliver the ? rst 130 feet, the 895 E is the largest material motor. It’s offered with a choice of three of its new 895 E Series model to North handler

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    the deep engines, although Incat Crowther is familiar with operational understanding Incat Crowther shares this model, having utilized them in recent off- with its clients. Part of Azam Marine’s enormous shore deliveries. In this speci? c project, the large success has been based on the vessels

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    M MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE “Medical care has to be managed by medical professional companies to ensure that cases are handled in the most ap- propriate way, crew members get highest quality of medical care at the most reasonable price. Additional requirements of GDPR put even additional pressure to

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    M MARITIME MEDICAL CREW CARE Crew Care: Managing Mariner Medical Care By Joe Keefe he competent authority shall as the population on shore enjoys. But, the embarking any mariner, a trusted 2012. There are several key aspects to require that, prior to begin- that’s not always the case. In case of

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  • MR Nov-19#67 VOICES BORIANA FARRAR, VP, SENIOR CLAIMS EXECUTIVE &)
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    ? cantly reduced basis, in many situations where un- ally impacting the way in which com- holders to ensure a level playing ? eld emissions. til very recently, physical attendance panies conduct their business at sea. exists in the transition to zero-emis- would have been required. To start, what is the

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    .” Nick Brown, Lloyd’s Register Photo: Lloyd’s Register To kick things off, share your insights utilize the rapidly developing digital insights. More recently, this focus has with new fuels and adoption of tech- and perspective on the scope and pace technologies smartly to improve op- shifted to new fuels

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    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry.

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    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET 110MW Changhua wind farm in 2020. Both wind farms are currently under construction.” Esteyo’s ELICAN Seajacks concept. UK-based Seajacks has been operating in the off- Source: ALE shore wind business since 2006. Since then, it’s built the Kraken, Leviathan, Hydra

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    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING Furthermore, all of this material can be torious harmful shipbreaking operations, give them business. So there has to be a an actual ship recycling project to ? nd traced downstream to a licenced disposal it appears that the desirability of ship balance. You cannot

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    Way to Recycle A Vessel which have reached the end of their life- EU has implemented the convention of the ship, and a ? nal survey prior to Given the recent international pressure cycle as “hazardous waste” because they through the EU Ship Scrapping Regula- recycling”. on shipowners to change past practices

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