Recent Business Reports On Us Navy

  • NAVY TO SPEND $5.9 BILLION OVER NEXT TWO FISCAL YEARS IMA has recently published the 17th in a series of business reports on U.S. Navy ship maintenance and modernization. These reports detail future ship maintenance plans and examine the impact of scheduled changes on the industry workload.

    Excerpts from the latest report are provided in this article.

    Planned Job Starts The U.S. Navy plans to spend $3.4 billion on ship depot maintenance in Fiscal Year 1990 and $2.5 billion in Fiscal Year 1991. Analysis of the most recent maintenance plan indicates the Navy has scheduled 17 percent fewer ship maintenance jobs in FY 1991 as a result of budget pressures and ship retirements.

    Exhibit 1 shows the number of scheduled Navy ship maintenance job starts planned for FY 1990 and 1991. As shown, the Navy has scheduled 234 ship maintenance availabilities in FY 1990 and 194 availabilities in FY 1991. Importantly, 11 fewer overhauls and other major job starts are scheduled in FY 1991— work which is generally bid coastwise.

    Geographical Distribution Of Future Work The total number of short duration jobs (i.e., less than six months) over the FY 1990-91 period will be divided roughly 50/50 between the East and West Coasts. The East Coast is expected to perform 186 short term availabilities over the two-year period, while the West Coast is scheduled to handle 187. A somewhat larger number of major availabilities will be performed on the East Coast over the two-year period. The East Coast is scheduled to perform 29 major jobs, while the West Coast is scheduled to handle 26.

    However, cuts in FY 1991 will have an unbalanced geographical impact. As indicated in Exhibit 1, overhauls and other major ship repair jobs next year will be reduced by 39 percent on the East Coast, 27 percent on the West Coast. The number of short duration jobs will fall by 17 percent on the East Coast, 12 percent on the West Coast. Importantly, work requiring drydocking will fall 32 percent on the West Coast, 10 percent on the East Coast.

    Homeport Restricted Work An important consideration is the extent to which future work will be restricted to homeport area shipyards.

    The Navy generally restricts depot maintenance which can be completed within six months to shipyards in the homeport area.

    Yards outside the homeport area are not invited to bid for the contract.

    IMA's analysis indicates that the number of homeport restricted jobs requiring drydocking will fall 54 percent in the San Diego area. Short term scheduled drydockings in Pearl Harbor will fall 50 percent.

    However, in contrast, homeport restricted scheduled drydockings will grow 10 percent in Norfolk, 17 percent in Charleston and 20 percent in Mayport.

    Ship Retirements As a result of the ongoing DOD review of defense requirements, the Navy active fleet will be substantially downsized over the next several years. According to recent reports, DOD plans to reduce the number of aircraft carriers from 14 to 12—and reduce the size of the Navy deployable forces from 542 to 488 ships over the next five years.

    Included in this reduction is the retirement of FF 1052 Class of frigates, 46 ships in all.

    Exhibit 2 lists ship activations and retirements planned for FY 1990 and FY 1991. Additional retirements could take place in FY 1991 due to budget pressures. Particularly noteworthy are the planned retirements of two relative- ly modern attack submarines. The Navy, in 1991, plans to retire the 24- year-old Queenfish and 21-year-old Sea Devil. These submarines normally have a 30-year operating life.

    IMA can provide an analysis of the future Navy ship repair market tailored to your specific requirements.

    IMA has been tracking this business sector for 14 years—and has a unique capability to identify likely developments and assess their impact on a company's business base.

    IMA's full 50-page July report on U.S. Navy ship maintenance and modernization is available for $200 and can be ordered by contacting IMA Associates, 2600 Virginia Avenue, N.W., Suite 901, Washington, D.C. 20037; telephone: (202) 333- 8501.

  • Tempo Budget pressures are affecting Navy ship procurement plans. Fewer ships are proposed to be built or converted over the next five years than in recent plans. Navy last year proposed a five-year plan to build or convert 133 ships. The plan submitted to Congress two years ago (FY 1985) proposed

  • continues to be the major source of business for shipyards and marine equipment manufacturers in the United States. This article is an excerpt from recent IMA quarterly business reports on Navy shipbuilding and repair. Navy Shipbuilding The Navy plans to build 90 ships and perform three major modification

  • opportunities available to shipyards, manufacturers, engineering firms and other marine suppliers. This article is based on information contained in recent reports. Overview The U.S. Navy is the major generator of work for shipyards and marine equipment manufacturers in this country. Total spending

  • A totally new report has been completed by IMA. It is a thoroughly professional assessment of future U.S. Navy procurement. The report is designed to assist U.S. and foreign firms interested in selling to the $40-billion-per-year U.S. Navy market. The 220-page report will be useful to business

  • its services IMA regularly publishes special market surveys. Each survey provides a comprehensive review of a subject with wide, current interest. Two recent surveys have dealt with the U.S. Navy shipbuilding and ship repair markets. Great expansion in these markets over the past several years has generated

  • The Navy has clearly become the dominant source of ship repair, as well as new ship construction in the United' States. Ten years ago Navy business accounted for 36 percent of ship repair employment and 58 percent of new ship construction employment in U.S. shipyards. The figures are now 78 percent

  • Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. 20037; telex: 64325 IMA; telefax: (202) 333-8504. Bath Launches Aegis Cruiser Monterey Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, recently launched the U.S. Navy Aegis guided missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG-61) at ceremonies at the shipyard. She is the fourth Aegis cruiser launched

  • contracts for construction and conversion of all 32 ships authorized in its ship construction and sealift charter programs. It was the first time in recent history, and perhaps ever, that all ships authorized in a given year were under contract before the end of that year. Moreover, as Assistant Secretary

  • the North American cruise trade. Market projections call for a tripling of cruise passenger travel during the coming decade. One industry analyst recently predicted that 150,000 to 200,000 new cruise ship berths will be required during the 1990s to satisfy increasing demand. Construction of these new

  • per year during this period. Average modernization expenditure has increased from $.9 million to $2.5 million per ship/year. Budget pressures have recently created a buildup in deferred maintenance. The clearest evidence is the decline in maintenance and modernization expenditure per ship over the

  • Each quarter IMA prepares an update on developments in the Navy ship maintenance and modernization market. This article is an excerpt from the most recent update prepared exclusively for publication only in Maritime Reporter. FY 1987 Budget Request The President's budget requests $6.4 billion for

  • MN Jun-19#3rd Cover . 
It’s no wonder that their recent deal to 
replace an aging)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 3rd Cover

    Canal System, Advance Marine and MelCal Cranes all enjoy a reputation for versatile applications in challenging conditions. It’s no wonder that their recent deal to replace an aging maintenance crane was also a similarly good f t. By Joseph Keefe hen Advance Marine recently delivered a telescopic slightly

  • MN Jun-19#22 COLUMN OP/ED
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    June 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    COLUMN OP/ED ? re? ghting is not a pro? table or sustainable venture. For determine that marine ? re? ghting services require dedi- example, to meet the regulatory standards ASA companies cated assets in contrast to vessels of opportunity currently have pre-positioned marine ? re? ghting equipment

  • MN Jun-19#21 , the Coast 
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    June 2019 - Marine News page: 21

    a regulatory basis. These “interpretations” are well beyond that envisioned when the regulations were published. Simultaneously, the Coast Guard’s recent interpretations of Sub- chapter M and merchant mariner credentialing requirements have po- tentially negatively impacted the US response framework

  • MN Jun-19#20 COLUMN OP/ED
A Reassessment of the 
U.S. Marine Salvage)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 20

    COLUMN OP/ED A Reassessment of the U.S. Marine Salvage Posture It has been ten years since the U.S. Salvage and Marine FireÀ ghting Regulations were published: Is it time for a reassessment of the U.S. marine salvage posture? By Jim Elliott In 1982, the National Research Coun- Reassessment of the Marine

  • MN Jun-19#18  also learn more by viewing a recent Cox 
customers receive)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 18

    will get the vessel over the hump much quicker. What steps have you taken to make sure that your MarineNews readers can also learn more by viewing a recent Cox customers receive an effective after-sales service? MR TV interview with Joel Reed. Click: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_ After sales is

  • MN Jun-19#17 board companies were not able to de- gap in the market for)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 17

    board companies were not able to de- gap in the market for a diesel, high Safety was a big issue for military operators when deploying gaso- sign a more durable engine, but the power to weight, performance out- line outboards. Were military pa- truth is that they simply haven’t tried to board. With NATO

  • MN Jun-19#16 INSIGHTS
outboard. This difference is ampli?  ed when)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    INSIGHTS outboard. This difference is ampli? ed when looking below the engine or because the drives are permanently in the water. the mid-range rpm. The increased low-end torque will push The Navy on the other hand, will be able to deploy missions heavy loaded hulls through rough waters with less

  • MN Jun-19#14 INSIGHTS
investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 14

    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable

  • MN Jun-19#12 BY THE NUMBERS
By the Numbers, the 2018 inspection data)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 12

    BY THE NUMBERS By the Numbers, the 2018 inspection data looks something like this in 2018: 40 (*): Number of U.S. ? agged vessels were detained by USCG (8 months data only) 75: PCT reportable marine casualties involving barges de? ned as collision, allision or grounding 1,812: Number

  • MN Jun-19#10 BY THE NUMBERS
The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    BY THE NUMBERS The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report on Flag State Control The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report given the millions of lives at stake – in the U.S. ? ag ? eet. contains statistics regarding inspections and enforcement In 2018 there were 40 valid Flag State

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

  • MN Jun-19#6 EDITOR’S NOTE
he end of one era typically signals the)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    EDITOR’S NOTE he end of one era typically signals the start of another. And, so it is with the business of building naval and municipal patrol boats, where the demand for smaller, more agile and T versatile hulls has skyrocketed. At the same time, and as governments everywhere come to the realization

  • MN Jun-19#4 MarineNews
MarineNews  June 2019 Volume 30   Number)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    MarineNews MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 (ISSN#1087-3864) (USPS#013-952) Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 tel: (561) 732-4368; fax: (561) 732-6984 Departments Analysis New York: 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 & tel: (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.

  • MN Jun-19#2 CONTENTS
MarineNews  June 2019  •  Volume 30   Number)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    CONTENTS MarineNews June 2019 • Volume 30 Number 6 INSIGHTS 14 Joel Reid Global Sales Director, COX Powertrain OP/ED 20 A Reassessment of the U.S. Marine Salvage Posture By Jim Elliott FeaturesFeatures Credit: OXE MARINE CRANES 24 The OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Cimco Marine’s 200hp

  • MR Jun-19#4th Cover MPT. SERIOUSLY S.M.A.R.T.
ONE SCHOOL. UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIE)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4th Cover

    MPT. SERIOUSLY S.M.A.R.T. ONE SCHOOL. UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES. There is nothing like incredibly-real training to better prepare you for serious real-life maritime situations. Our ongoing investment in S.M.A.R.T. simulation provides a visually immersive level of realism that is simply not available in other

  • MR Jun-19#3rd Cover POWERFUL MARKET 
INTELLIGENCE
UNPARALLELED BUSINESS)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 3rd Cover

    POWERFUL MARKET INTELLIGENCE UNPARALLELED BUSINESS INSIGHTS, DATA, AND MARKET ANALYTICS COVERING: ???G?????????????????G?? UFPSOs UTLPs USEMIs UFLNGs O YEARLY OUTLOOK USPARs UFSRUs O MONTHLY REPORTS We don’t just provide a snapshot of the sector. Our online fully searchable databases update

  • MR Jun-19#64 MR JUNE 2019_Index:Layout 1  6/4/2019  1:20 PM  Page)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 64

    MR JUNE 2019_Index:Layout 1 6/4/2019 1:20 PM Page 1 ADVERTISER INDEX Page Advertiser Website Phone # 15 . . . . . .ABS Americas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.eagle.com/cybersecurity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  • MR Jun-19#62 MR
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

  • MR Jun-19#55  Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent-
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two custom-built cutter suction dredgers Indicating Radio built

  • MR Jun-19#54  than 6,000 VDRs and S-VDRs. In recent  extracted from the Danelec)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    , Danelec bring to market VDRs to meet the original IMO car- riage requirements in 2002. Since then, we’ve sup- plied more than 6,000 VDRs and S-VDRs. In recent extracted from the Danelec server into the BOQA years we broadened our marine portfolio with ECDIS software, which uses advanced analytical tools

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

  • MR Jun-19#51 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

  • MR Jun-19#50 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.