Rescue Vessel

  • The newest addition to the U.S.

    Coast Guard fleet, a 47-foot rescue vessel designed and built by Textron Marine Systems (TMS), successfully righted itself in 5.3 seconds during its first test, conducted recently at the Textron shipyard in New Orleans. This patrol and rescue boat has the capability to roll over 360 degrees and self-right within 30 seconds.

    "This prototype represents many technological innovations," said Textron Marine Systems president John J. Kelly. "The rugged aluminum hull is not only very strong, it is lightweight and efficient. It can withstand maximum winds of hurricane force, and this boat, which is capable of speeds in excess of 25 knots, is twice as fast as the existing steel hull 44-foot Coast Guard rescue vessel.

    "Besides having the capability of a complete rollover, the boat can pitch-pole or lunge bow first, flipping end over end 360 degrees into the swells, and self-right in less than 30 seconds. The two-person operating crew is housed inside an enclosed bridge for added safety and better visibility. The 44-foot lifeboat which it replaced has an open bridge with its crew strapped in place," he continued.

    The motor lifeboat was delivered in mid-August to the Coast Guard National Motor Lifeboat training school in Ilwaco, Wash.

    The contract award totals over $2 million for the design and production of the motor lifeboat prototype, and a five-boat option totaling over $4.5 million. The success of this 47- foot rescue boat program will lead to the eventual procurement of 100 of these craft by the Coast Guard.

    Recently, Textron Marine Systems was selected to provide highspeed rescue fireboats for the New York City Fire Department.

    Textron Marine Systems, a Division of Textron Inc., is based in eastern New Orleans and employs approximately 800 people. The company produces high-technology marine craft for both commercial and military applications.

    For free literature on the facilities and capabilities of Textron Marine Systems, Circle 53 on Reader Service Card

  • S t e i n e r Shipyard, Bayou LaBatre, Ala., has completed the conversion of a 180-foot oil field supply boat into a standby/rescue vessel for use in the U.K. sector of the North Sea. The Veesea Typhoon is one of four standby/rescue vessels that will be operated by a joint venture between Vector

  • A pair of Cummins 6BTA5.9-M1 marine diesels were selected to power a new rough-water fire/rescue vessel recently delivered to the Avalon Harbor Patrol of Catalina Island. The 7-1/2-ton, 12-foot-beam, 32-foot-long boat was built by Seaway Boat Company of Long Beach, Calif. It has been placed in

  • a C$16.4-million contract to build a hydrographic survey vessel and a C$35.1-million order for the construction of two Type 500 search and rescue vessels, and is expected to shortly sign a contract with the Canadian Government worth C$347 million to build a Polar Class 8 icebreaker. Shieldings

  • technology to earn acclaim as one of the world’s largest designers and builders of medium-sized vessels, logistic support vessels, surveillance and rescue vessels, defense, coastal craft and vehicle/passenger vessels. VT Halter has delivered more than 2,600 vessels to clients in 29 countries. (As published

  • miles. To protect its four-person operating crew and give them improved visibility, the motor lifeboat has an enclosed bridge. The old rescue vessels the lifeboat is replacing have open bridges, requiring the crew to be strapped into place. The 1988 Coast Guard contract with Textron Marine

  • ; ROV, AUV and dive bell handling systems, and cable laying carousels and spoolers. A-frame and winch systems range from submersible and submarine rescue vessels LARS including several systems in continuous service for over 30 years, through to oceanographic tool deployment to 10,000m, and deepwater lowering

  • ; ROV, AUV and dive bell handling systems, and cable laying carousels and spoolers. A-frame and winch systems range from submersible and submarine rescue vessels LARS including several systems in continuous service for over 30 years, through to oceanographic tool deployment to 10,000m, and deepwater lowering

  • ; ROV, AUV and dive bell handling systems, and cable laying carousels and spoolers. A-frame and winch systems range from submersible and submarine rescue vessels LARS including several systems in continuous service for over 30 years, through to oceanographic tool deployment to 10,000m, and deepwater lowering

  • 37 years before, in 1963, the loss of the USS Thresher and all 129 aboard, had stirred similar feelings, and had spurred development of dedicated rescue vessels. A new initiative involving UK defense contractors, offshore and underwater technology specialists is intended to improve the chances of survival

  • main areas of shipbuilding are high-speed Surface Effect Ships, special design vessels such as the sea/river cruise ship, research vessels and rescue vessels, and a wide range of naval vessels. At present, the range of Seaswift Surface Effect Ships consists of the Seaswift 23, Seaswift 34 and Seaswift

  • on portable trucks. The barge was then submerged, allowing the vessel to float off. Mr. Quinn said the company will also launch two new search and rescue vessels by the same method later this year. The SAR 500 vessels are also being constructed in Victoria for the Canadian Coast Guard. The Fisheries

  • MN Jun-19#22 COLUMN OP/ED
?  re?  ghting is not a pro?  table or)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    COLUMN OP/ED ? re? ghting is not a pro? table or sustainable venture. For determine that marine ? re? ghting services require dedi- example, to meet the regulatory standards ASA companies cated assets in contrast to vessels of opportunity currently have pre-positioned marine ? re? ghting equipment

  • MN Jun-19#20  other analyses, in 1997, 
ship rescue salvage and towing situa-)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 20

    was “to assess the and fewer marine accidents.” present national posture for coping with Based on these studies and other analyses, in 1997, ship rescue salvage and towing situa- the U.S. Coast Guard began hosting public workshops tions for time-critical offshore salvage in “to address issues related

  • MN Jun-19#18 INSIGHTS
our customers will only be happy if they can use)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 18

    INSIGHTS our customers will only be happy if they can use the engine The CXO300 is said to have a 100% higher peak torque at the crankshaft than the leading gasoline 300hp out- to go out to sea reliably. We have put in place stringent cus- boards, which enables the craft to move more weight tomer service

  • MN Jun-19#16 INSIGHTS
outboard. This difference is ampli?  ed when)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    INSIGHTS outboard. This difference is ampli? ed when looking below the engine or because the drives are permanently in the water. the mid-range rpm. The increased low-end torque will push The Navy on the other hand, will be able to deploy missions heavy loaded hulls through rough waters with less

  • MN Jun-19#12 BY THE NUMBERS
By the Numbers, the 2018 inspection data)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 12

    BY THE NUMBERS By the Numbers, the 2018 inspection data looks something like this in 2018: 40 (*): Number of U.S. ? agged vessels were detained by USCG (8 months data only) 75: PCT reportable marine casualties involving barges de? ned as collision, allision or grounding 1,812: Number

  • MN Jun-19#10 BY THE NUMBERS
The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 10

    BY THE NUMBERS The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report on Flag State Control The U.S. Coast Guard’s 2018 Domestic Annual Report given the millions of lives at stake – in the U.S. ? ag ? eet. contains statistics regarding inspections and enforcement In 2018 there were 40 valid Flag State

  • MN Jun-19#6 EDITOR’S NOTE
he end of one era typically signals the)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    EDITOR’S NOTE he end of one era typically signals the start of another. And, so it is with the business of building naval and municipal patrol boats, where the demand for smaller, more agile and T versatile hulls has skyrocketed. At the same time, and as governments everywhere come to the realization

  • MN Jun-19#4 MarineNews
MarineNews  June 2019 Volume 30   Number)
    June 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    MarineNews MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 (ISSN#1087-3864) (USPS#013-952) Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 tel: (561) 732-4368; fax: (561) 732-6984 Departments Analysis New York: 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 & tel: (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.

  • MR Jun-19#60 MR
Select jobs that can be found posted now on www.MaritimeJ)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    MR Select jobs that can be found posted now on www.MaritimeJobs.com Employment Contact Norfolk, VA, 23502 USA Marine Mechanic New York Cruise Lines Email: civmar@sealiftcommand.com Contact Full Time , Project Manager Work Phone : 757-341-4610 Email: civmar@sealiftcommand.com Category:

  • MR Jun-19#58 This directory section is an editorial feature published)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Jun-19#55 . in The Netherlands.
tion to rescue authorities as soon as)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    de Grood, account manager Longitude and personal identi? cation informa- tem is featured in Wärtsilä’s IntelliTug project. in The Netherlands. tion to rescue authorities as soon as possible. www.wartsila.com gme.net.au Hurtigruten Inks Rotten Fish NAVTOR NavBox Certi? ed Azurtane Launches New Vessel

  • MR Jun-19#54 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
Ship IoT Tech: Enabling)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS Ship IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive Approach to Navigation Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA).

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
“The feasibility report showed)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

  • MR Jun-19#51 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 51

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

  • MR Jun-19#50 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
By)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

  • MR Jun-19#49 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

  • MR Jun-19#48 MarTID 2019
under management.  grows in size and establishes)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MarTID 2019 under management. grows in size and establishes many years METIs of data, this will be an important metric METIs globally have historically ‘car- to track. ried the water’ in terms of mariner train- Roughly two-thirds of the respondents ing, for regulatory compliance, licensing do not

  • MR Jun-19#47 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 47

    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database creased their personal seafarer training The Future is Murky expenditure over the last ? ve years, and While “autonomy” more than 55% expect their personal garners its fair share of head- training expenditures to grow in the up- lines

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
2019)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#45 world yearbook
system includes the underlying owners)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    world yearbook system includes the underlying owners, vessel opera- ates around 700 vessels at any one time”. Oldendorff tors (sometimes called “freight merchants”) and major Carriers estimated that its controlled ? eet (owned and charterers. On the tanker side, brokers Poten compiles chartered) stood

  • MR Jun-19#44 2019
its focus on liner cargo and the logistics of de-)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    2019 its focus on liner cargo and the logistics of de- emerging. Three years on, the expanded Cos- TABLE 2 livering boxes, the listed company has recently co completed another merger, acquiring Ori- divested investments in Danish supermarkets, ent Overseas Container Line (OOCL). Unlike THE WORLD’S

  • MR Jun-19#42 2019
TOP SHIPOWNERS: 
IS BIGGER BETTER?
Like any other)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    2019 TOP SHIPOWNERS: IS BIGGER BETTER? Like any other business, some shipping companies are bigger than others. This article looks at some of the larger participants in the various sectors. “Big” can be de? ned in multiple ways. Here, contributing editor Barry Parker takes a deep dive into the data

  • MR Jun-19#41 world yearbook
could be delivered to any one of seven)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    world yearbook could be delivered to any one of seven Top U.S. Ports cargo in value (in Millions) Top U.S. Ports Cargo (total tons) terminals in the “Los Angeles–Long RankU.S. Port 2018 2017 RankU.S. Port 2018 Tons2017 Tons Beach complex,” which is another way 1 Los Angeles $

  • MR Jun-19#38 2019
BY ROBERT DAY, HEAD OF OFFSHORE, VESSELS VALUE
NEWBUILD)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    2019 BY ROBERT DAY, HEAD OF OFFSHORE, VESSELS VALUE NEWBUILD moved into full swing and we saw the THE RIG MARKET DEMOLITION Unsurprisingly, across the offshore market ? ooded with distressed ton- In the rig sector, Borr Drilling has Tidewater continues to set the stan- sectors, newbuild orders have