1989 1 1 Technology

  • An Update On U.S. Navy Spending For Ships And Equipment In FY1989 The U.S. Navy continues to be the driving force for shipyards and many equipment manufacturers.

    Spending for ships, weapons, support equipment and maintenance exceeds $34 billion annually.

    Ship Procurement The Navy has requested funds to build 17 ships and lengthen two fleet oilers in Fiscal Year 1989. A budget of $9.1 billion for ship procurement is proposed. Details for the ship procurement budget for FY 1988 to 1992 are shown in Exhibit 1.

    Some changes from last year include a more than 14 percent cut from the fast combat support ship (AOE) budget. The Navy had planned to budget $425.4 million for the AOE program—but reduced the funding level to $363.9 million in this year's budget request. The TACS crane ship conversion planned for FY 1989 was dropped due to budget pressures. Funds for strategic sealift were also dropped—largely as a reaction to a hotly contested decision which transferred control over the Ready Reserve Fleet (RRF) from the Navy to the Maritime Administration.

    In early April, the House Armed Services Committee recommended the Navy ship program be approved— with the exception of the proposed oceanographic ship. The Navy has asked for $74 million to build one SWATH-design AGOR research ship. The committee recommended against this funding on the basis the design was not fully developed.

    The Senate Armed Services Committee bill completed mark up in late April— and the Senate bill essentially similar to the House version.

    Both the House and the Senate must act on the Committees' authorization bill recommendations. Each chamber will vote on an authorization bill. Differences between the two bills will be negotiated by House/Senate conferees. A compromise final version will be sent to the President for signature. An appropriations bill must also be passed by each chamber, providing funding for ship and other defense procurements.

    A compromise appropriations bill must then be agreed to by House/Senate conferees. Both the authorization bill and appropriations bill must be passed before the FY 1989 program is finalized.

    The House Armed Services Committee has recommended the addition of one Army logistics support vessel (LSV) in the FY 1989 program.

    Four of these ships are under contract to Moss Point Marine, a member of the Trinity Industries' shipbuilding group. The Army has indicated that a fifth vessel is required.

    In late March, Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Va., received a contract to begin pruchasing long lead items for the aircraft carriers CVN-74 and -75. Two carriers, the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and the USS George Washington (CVN-73) are currently under construction at Newport News. This new contract gives an unprecedented backlog of four nuclear carriers.

    In other ship programs, more than 90 Navy ships are under construction at U.S. shipyards. Full details are provided in Exhibit 2.

    Weapons & Support Equipment A total of $11.1 billion has been requested in FY 1989 to buy missiles, torpedoes, electronics and other support equipment. This is an increase of $600 million over FY 1988.

    Ship Maintenance Budget Maintenance and modernization of naval ships continues to drive work in U.S. ship-repair yards.

    Spending for ship repair is projected to be $4.8 billion in FY 1989.

    From FY 1983 through FY 1987, there has been a clear decline in the number of overhauls—while the number of short term availabilities has increased significantly. In FY 1988, the number of both overhauls and SRAs/PMAs is expected to decline.

    In FY 1989, SRA/PMA job starts are projected to increase somewhat over this year.

    Funding constraints are now obviously affecting Navy ship maintenance.

    A year ago the Navy planned to spend more than $5 billion to perform 215 scheduled maintenance job starts in FY 1988. The most recent plan for FY 1988 calls for expenditures of $4.7 billion to perform 178 scheduled job starts.

    Almost $600 million has been cut from the Navy active fleet ship maintenance and modernization plan for FY 1989. Most of the cuts are in the area of ship alterations— where planned spending has been cut from $1.6 billion to under $1.1 billion. The trend toward fewer overhauls and more short term scheduled availabilities continues.

    Details are shown in Exhibit 3.

    N e w Technology Development Funding totaling $9.2 billion has been requested for research and engineering in FY 1989. This figure is slightly lower than FY 1988. Details for recent years are shown in Exhibit 5.

    Budget pressures have forced the Navy to cut back on proposed research and development spending in FY 1989. A year ago, the Navy planned to budget slightly more than $10 billion for this activity in FY 1989. The figure has been cut 8 percent to $9.2 billion. This is still double the spending level of 10 years ago.

    Expanding DARPA Role In Navy R&D The House Armed Services Committee reaffirmed that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) should manage the advanced submarine technology program.

    This program is intended to identify and develop revolutionary submarine hull and nonnuclear propulsion technologies. DARPA's responsibility will continue over the next three to five years—with total funding exceeding $800 million anticipated for the work.

    The Committee also assigned responsibility to DARPA to begin development of an advanced torpedo.

    Additional funding of $10 million is recommended for FY 1989 to begin this program.

    Another responsibility assigned to DARPA is the antisubmarine warfare initiative. This is to be a major integrated technology effort to "come to grips" with the Soviet submarine menace. Additional funding of $40 million has been recommended to begin this program.

    Twelve years ago, IMA was asked by the Navy to perform a major study of its procedures for managing naval ship procurement. This was followed by an assessment of procedures used to manage the naval ship modernization program. Since then IMA has performed consulting assignments for over 100 commercial clients in 20 countries—establishing a leading international position in marine and naval market research.

    In 1981, IMA began publishing a series of special reports on naval business opportunities. These reports now reach over 400 subscribers.

    They include equipment manufacturers, shipyards, technology firms, electronics suppliers, etc.

    This article draws from several recent r e p o r t s and provides an indication of the type of coverage provided to subscribers.

    New Naval Technology Opportunities IMA has just published a detailed guide to the new naval technology program. It describes more than 200 specific projects involving technology development representing tremendous sales opportunities for designers, suppliers and manufacturers.

    Highlights include: • a major high-level effort initiated to develop revolutionary surface ship designs; • engineering development of the SSN-21 which requires expenditures of more than $400 million over the next two years; • more than $800 million to be spent over the next five years on advanced attack submarine concepts—a major new initiative to be managed by DARPA; • design and development of nuclear propulsion technology which continues to exceed $700 million annually; • D-5 ballistic missile development expenditures which will exceed $1.6 billion over the next two years as the Lockheed-managed program transitions to the production stage; • Tomahawk cruise missile development expenditures to exceed $130 million over the next two years; • Boeing-managed Sea Lance ASW standoff weapon development expenditures which will exceed $150 million FY 1988-89—a figure lower than originally planned due to budget constraints; • substantial increases in funding for development of the MK 50 advanced lightweight torpedo (ALWT) in the new FY 1989 budget— with two-year funding of development expenditures now projected to exceed $275 million; • project definition contracts to be awarded this summer kicking off a 30-month design and engineering phase for the new generation mine; • expenditures over the next two years for Aegis engineering and development to exceed $350 million; • more than $118 million earmarked in FY 1988-89 for surface ship ASW system development and engineering; • development and engineering of submarine sonar systems projected to exceed $275 million over the next two years; • full scale engineering to develop and deliver 28 AN/BSY(2) submarine combat systems—a $7.3 billion long-term development and procurement program for the Seawolf submarine; • expenditures to develop the Fixed Distributed System (FDS)—a key component of future offboard ASW surveillance—totaling $170 million in FY 1988-89; • more than $97 million over the next two years to be spent on developing advanced submarine communications systems; and • almost $87 million to be available in FY 1988-89 for developing new manufacturing technology.

  • of which is represented by funding for two new aircraft carriers, three attack submarines, one Trident submarine and five Aegis cruisers. The FY 1989 budget request is $9.1 billion. Details for ship construction planned over the next five years are shown in Exhibit 3. Continuing coverage of this

  • over the past 10 years. In 1980, the Navy spent $4.6 billion for R&D. This figure has now more than doubled—to $9.5 billion in 1988 and $9.2 billion in 1989. Exhibit 1, "Trend in the Navy R&D Budget," provides details on Navy R&D spending from 1980-1989. Range of Technology Development Navy technology

  • The National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) has announced plans for its 1989 Annual Meeting and has issued a Call for Papers to be presented at the conference. The NMEA Annual Meeting will be held October 12-17, 1989, at the Olympic Four Seasons Hotel in Seattle, Wash. The agenda calls

  • The National Shipbuilding Research Program Ship Production Symposium, which will be held September 13-15, 1989, at the Sheraton National Hotel in Crystal City, Washington, D.C., is soliciting unclassified abstracts and papers on a wide range of topics related to advanced shipbuilding procedures.

  • operational weather envelope." The Frederick G. Creed was designed and built by Swath Ocean Systems, Inc., of Chula Vista, Calif., launched October 1989, and is the fourth in its series of swath vessels. She is approximately 67 feet in overall length, 32 feet in beam, draws 9.5 feet and has a top

  • to give them time to add equipment required by the new regulations. Written comments on the proposed regulations will be accepted until the end of May 1989. The proposed regulations were published in the January 30, 1989 issue of the Federal Register. Copies of the proposed regulations may be obtained by

  • American pilots, engineers, marketing and scientific personnel in the U.S. and abroad. Pan American plans to introduce 60- and 120- passenger models in 1989. For a free copy of the color brochure from Pan American Hovercraft, C i r c l e 2 7 o n Reader Service Car

  • aligned by laser, the 377-foot-long Sir Eric Sharp is one of the most technologically advanced cableships afloat. When commissioned in spring 1989, the new vessel will take up station in Bermuda to provide CWM's new Atlantic Cable Maintenance Service in conjunction with the Mercury, another

  • opinions of its membership, the Society of Naval Archit e c t s and Marine Engineers (SNAME) is planning a more diversified technical program for its 1989 Annual Meeting to be held in New York in November. Through the efforts of the papers committee chaired by Jack Abbott, the Society solicited papers tha

  • Official plans have been announced for the 1989 International Maritime Exposition, which is held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME). In past years, the show's primary exhibitor focus has been the design, construction, use, and mainte

  • is the U.S. Signatory to Inmarsat and its largest owner. Comsat said the Inmarsat SafetyNet broadcast service is expected to be available in late 1989 to U.S. Government authorities to warn ships of marine hazards, provide storm warnings, and carry routine weather broadcasts and chart corrections

  • MN Jun-19#25 PROPULSION
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    PROPULSION that when you lift the soundproof cowl, everything is easily accessible. CIMCO also designed a similar mounting pat- tern as a Yamaha 200hp outboard; the prop uses the same spline and shaft. As Pim Polesie, the Chief Marketing Credit: OXE Of? cer for Cimco, explained, “The ap- proach was to

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T  e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives
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    PROPULSION T e OXE Diesel Outboard Arrives Credit: OXE Swedish manufacturer Cimco Marine has developed the world’s f rst 200hp diesel marine outboard – named the OXE Diesel – for maritime security agencies, yacht tenders, municipalities and military applications. By Rick Eyerdam s Trace Laborde, Marine

  • MN Jun-19#14 INSIGHTS
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    INSIGHTS investor and Chairman Charles Good. After a few years of development, interest was sparked from the US Government and UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The MoD’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) was so im- pressed by the concept, it agreed to provide Cox Powertrain with “invaluable

  • MN Jun-19#8 Authors   Contributors
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MarineNews 
June 2019
Volume 30)
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    Authors Contributors & MarineNews June 2019 Volume 30 Number 6 Elliott Ewing Mulligan Eyerdam Jim Elliott is President of the American Salvage As- Tom Ewing is a freelance writer specializing in energy sociation and Chief Operating Of? cer of the Teichman and environmental issues. Group of Companies

  • MR Jun-19#61 MR
                                          
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    MR Professional www.MaritimeProfessional.com Technology Associates, Inc. GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC.GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC. Bringing Engineering to Successful Fruition Naval Architects ? Naval Architecture Services and Marine Engineers ? Marine Engineering

  • MR Jun-19#58 This directory section is an editorial feature published)
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    This directory section is an editorial feature published in every issue for the convenience of the readers of MARITIME REPORTER. A quick-reference readers’ guide, it includes the names and addresses of the world’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of all types of marine machinery, equipment, supplies and

  • MR Jun-19#57 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’  Marine Equipment)
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    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News’ Marine Equipment Guide Hydraulic and Marine Safety Pneumatic Equipment A C A.1 Valves C.1 Safety & Survival Gear A.2 Actuators Business news you can Ship Equipment D trust and advertising results you can count on. D.1 Helm Chairs We have you covered in every

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    You’re invited to meet the leading players ??????????u????????????U?????????????? technology for passenger ships. See what’s possible when innovative suppliers Register now showcase their latest developments for the for your free pass booming cruise and ferry industry. marineinteriors- expo.com/pass ?????

  • MR Jun-19#55 P
PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
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    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS NEW MT 603 Series Radio Holland: Water-Activated GPS EPIRB NavCom Package for The MT603FG Two Cutter Suction Dredgers water-activated, Radio Holland Netherlands (Rotterdam) recent- GPS-equipped ly booked an order to deliver a NavCom pack- Emergency Position age to two

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PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS
Ship IoT Tech: Enabling)
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    P PRODUCTS MARINE ELECTRONICS Ship IoT Tech: Enabling Proactive Approach to Navigation Safety The airline industry has long employed ? ight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA).

  • MR Jun-19#52 T
TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
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    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS “The feasibility report showed that it could be done, but we wanted to prove it. When looking at the business side [of the com- pany], we saw a really big demand for hydrogen fuel cell vessels” Dr. Joseph Pratt, CEO & CTO of Golden Gate Zero Emission Ma- rine (GGZM), a

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TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
used for new vessel builds and)
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    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS used for new vessel builds and retro? ts around the world. “The Chicken Comes First” One of the oft-quoted challenges is the “chicken and egg” dilemma when a dis- ruptive propulsion technology enters the maritime market. Critics will claim that ship owners are reluctant to

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TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS
Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing?
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    T TECH REPORT MARINE FUELS Hydrogen: The Next Big Thing? By Joseph DiRenzo, PE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology to leading voice in the ? eld is Dr. Joseph gers in the Bay Area. cap and trade program aimed at reducing Satisfy Future IMO Requirements Pratt, CEO and CTO of Golden Gate According to Dr.

  • MR Jun-19#49 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
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    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database OPINIONS ON AUTONOMY in marine fuel from 3.5 to 0.5% by 2020, and long- term the proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions While technology behind the advent of autonomous operations is ubiquitous 50% by 2050. On the commercial side

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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MarTID 2019 under management. grows in size and establishes many years METIs of data, this will be an important metric METIs globally have historically ‘car- to track. ried the water’ in terms of mariner train- Roughly two-thirds of the respondents ing, for regulatory compliance, licensing do not

  • MR Jun-19#47 MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights)
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    MarTID 2019: the second annual maritime training insights database creased their personal seafarer training The Future is Murky expenditure over the last ? ve years, and While “autonomy” more than 55% expect their personal garners its fair share of head- training expenditures to grow in the up- lines

  • MR Jun-19#46 MarTID 2019
Maritime Training Insights Database
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    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    MarTID 2019 Maritime Training Insights Database 2019 Training Practices Report esults from the second annual While a complex and time-consuming to livestock. While ships, technology tously in 2018 – 46 – which is the lowest Maritime Training Insights endeavor to plan, execute, compile and and increasing

  • MR Jun-19#41 world yearbook
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    world yearbook could be delivered to any one of seven Top U.S. Ports cargo in value (in Millions) Top U.S. Ports Cargo (total tons) terminals in the “Los Angeles–Long RankU.S. Port 2018 2017 RankU.S. Port 2018 Tons2017 Tons Beach complex,” which is another way 1 Los Angeles $

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FERRY FIRST
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    world yearbook FERRY FIRST Alabama’s Gee’s Bend Ferry re- cently entered service after being converted from geared-diesel to Images courtesy Glosten/ALDOT become the ? rst zero-emission, New ATB for VANE electric-powered passenger/car In 2018, Vane Brothers took deliv- ferry in the U.S. Owned by the

  • MR Jun-19#26 2019
THE U.S. WORK
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    2019 THE U.S. WORK A ‘work in progress,’ the North American brown water, shallow draft sectors have experienced a tumultuous year of evolution, changing market conditions, a rapidly shifting regulatory environment and new opportunities. Anything but boring; and within the pages of Maritime Reporter’ &

  • MR Jun-19#22 T
TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY
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    T TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY one design.” als. “I’ve just submitted a White Paper Also, creating a system that is ‘smart’, to the Of? ce of Naval Research for that a system able to adjust itself continually full budget,” said van Hemmen. “On to maximize and ef? ciently convert the the commercial side we

  • MR Jun-19#21 T
TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY
SurfWEC @ a Glance
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    T TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY SurfWEC @ a Glance Company SurfWEC LLC Tech Wave Energy Harnessing Device Start of Design 2007 Patented 2012 Patent Owner Stevens Institute a patented variable-depth shoaling fea- sil fuels. The patent ricated with buoy- in 2019.” of Technology License Holder SurfWEC LLC ture

  • MR Jun-19#20 T
TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY
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    T TECH: RENEWABLE ENERGY Ef? cient Wave Power ... Really! enewable energy production er source, energy storage, and wave Hydraulics, Bosch-Rexroth, Deeptek, Wave-generated power is of? cially ‘hot’, as a num- damping units co-located with existing HYDAC, ISCO Pipe, Wire Co./Lank- could be considered

  • MR Jun-19#19 I
INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY
companies to gain expertise)
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    I INSIGHTS: RENEWABLE ENERGY companies to gain expertise, both tech- from Massachusetts to Virginia. In 2018, The project utilizes patented Voltur- models will allow easier, faster and more nically and learning how to export this DOE chose the New York State Energy nUS platform technology, a ? oating