Thermal Insulation

  • Compliance, Safety, Insurance, Emissions & Maintenance

     
    There are a million important things to worry about on any vessel, so why does high-performance thermal insulation deserve a place on the list? Answer: Because it has a very important role to play in keeping your vessel out on the water, being operated safely by a crew and safely carrying passengers. 
     
    What is High-performance Thermal Insulation?
    When we talk about high-performance thermal insulation, we’re talking about insulation that can stop a significant amount of heat, in a relatively small space. Not the stuff that sits in between your drywall at home, but insulation made from sheet metal, metal foil, high-performance fabrics and composites that manage heat around exhaust and after-treatment systems, turbo chargers, high-pressure oil and hydraulic lines and other high-heat areas on a vessel. 
     
    So, now that we know what it is, why should you care about it? 
     
    Thermal Insulation, SOLAS and Safety
    SOLAS and safety go hand in hand. SOLAS regulations are there to keep your crew and passengers safe. And, of course, failing a SOLAS spot-check could mean getting stuck in port. The first area where thermal insulation is critical to SOLAS compliance is fire prevention. SOLAS calls for insulating any hot surfaces that could come into contact with fuel, as well as protecting fuel and oil lines against failure. Practically, this typically means insulating engine turbochargers and exhaust and after-treatment systems, as well as shielding fuel and oil line connection and joints, and double-walled piping for high-pressure fuel and oil lines.
     
    Another area SOLAS specifically addresses is noise, requiring compliance with the Maritime Safety Committee’s resolution MSC.337(91). This resolution prescribes acceptable noise levels for different parts of a vessel, such as machinery spaces, control rooms and other working spaces. High-performance thermal insulation not only insulates against heat, it can be designed and implemented to significantly decrease the noise emitted by engines and other mechanical systems. 
     
    One area that SOLAS doesn’t address specifically, but which we recommend considering, is safe-touch temperatures. SOLAS only requires insulating surfaces against fire danger if they reach above 220°C, but ASTM C1055 recommends keeping exposed surfaces that workers might come into contact with at or below 60°C. Many process engineers recommend 48°C as a more reasonable safe-to-touch temperature. 
     
    Typically, insulating engine components and exhaust systems to maintain safe-to-touch temperatures is impractical, and workers won’t come into contact with these surfaces while they’re at operating temperatures under standard maintenance procedures. However, if your vessel has high-temperature equipment in areas where workers could accidentally come into contact with it, such as hot water pipes, valves or other components, it is well worth implementing a thermal insulation solution that considers safe-to-touch temperatures.
     
    Thermal Insulation & Insurance
    It should be no surprise that, given thermal insulation’s role in safety, it’s also something that could be of great importance to your insurer. We were recently contacted by a company who was at risk of a significant insurance rate increase. They had experienced several fires caused by flammable materials coming into contact with exhaust components. Their insurer gave them a mandate: Fix the problem, or take a rate hike. 
     
    Thermal Structures was able to help them develop a thermal insulation solution that  reduced the risk of fires, improved safety, reduced downtime and made their insurer happy. Thermal insulation has so many safety benefits that, even if you haven’t experienced any problems, it’s worth talking with your insurer to see if implementing more comprehensive thermal insulation could help to reduce your rates. 
     
    Thermal Insulation & Emissions
    Whether you’re simply subject to the International Marine Organization’s (IMO) global marine engine regulations, or the more stringent Emission Control Area (ECA) regulations, thermal insulation plays a critical role in helping to meet those requirements. Meeting emissions standards often goes hand in hand with the generation of additional heat. Sometimes that heat is an essential part of the process, like with Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration. Other times, it’s simply a byproduct. In either case, when engines are producing more heat, they need more effective thermal insulation.
     
    Today, that’s largely relevant to compliance with IMO emissions standards, but it’s likely that, in the future, reducing emissions could become a source of profit. The EU and other organizations have already proposed “cap and trade” style programs for maritime emissions, where lower emissions producers would be able to sell their excess capacity to higher emissions producers. Vessels and fleets that have taken strides toward lowering emissions today will be well positioned to take advantage of those programs when they come into place. 
     
    Thermal Insulation & Maintenance
    The type of thermal insulation on your vessel can have a big impact on how easy or difficult it is to perform maintenance on systems covered by that insulation. Many times, thermal insulation has to be removed to perform maintenance on the system it’s protecting. If thermal insulation is poorly designed or implemented, it can cause a significant and costly obstacle to that maintenance. 
     
    There’s no one-size-fits-all answer in picking the right thermal insulation, so it’s important to consider several factors. For example, fabric insulation blankets typically have a lower initial cost, but over time they can “cure” into shape, and removing them can cause them to disintegrate. Foil and sheet metal insulation might have a higher initial cost, but they can be removed and reattached for the life of the engine without being damaged. 
     
    Cleaning is also an important consideration. On many vessels, surfaces that could become contaminated with oil, fuel or other flammable chemicals are frequently cleaned. Sheet metal and foil insulation can stand up to rigorous cleaning and even pressure-washing without any issues, but fabric insulation could present a problem. Picking the right thermal insulation can have a big impact on the ongoing cost and ease or difficulty of your vessel’s maintenance. 
     
    Getting Help
    The implementation of thermal insulation can be a lot to think about, and there’s no need to go it alone. Your best bet is to work closely with your engine manufacturer, or a thermal insulation provider, to make sure that your vessel or fleet is using appropriate, suitable and effective thermal insulation. It’s the first step in making sure your vessels are as safe, efficient and easy to maintain as possible.
     
     
    The Author
    Bruce Kaplan is Product Development Manager at Thermal Structures, Inc.
     
     
    (As published in the September 2016 edition of Marine News)
  • One of the common items found on almost every vessel constructed that is frequently overlooked is thermal insulation material. As vessels increase in age. it is safe to say that the insulation systems start to degrade with time and abuse. In fact, if moisture is ever introduced to the insulation from

  • Trelleborg’s offshore operation announced it has consolidated its range of high performance thermal insulation materials to house them all under one brand – Vikotherm, which was presented last month at OTC in Houston. “As subsea environments become increasingly more demanding; going deeper and further than

  • captioned with the product's vital specifications. The catalog is divided into six sections covering: high temperature insulation pad components, thermal insulation lagging, all purpose fiberglass tapes, general welding fabrics, exterior pad and equipment covers and acoustic and gasketing compounds. The

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  • with the introduction of Rockwool Marine Firebatt 2000. The multipurpose Marine Firebatt 2000 is a rock mineral wool slab, providing fire protection, thermal insulation and significant noise reduction to marine craft and offshore installations. Marine Firebatt 2000 has been designed to meet stringent requirements

  • Firebatt 2000. Aimed at the commercial marine sector, the multipurpose Marine Firebatt 2000 is a rock mineral wool slab, providing fire protection, thermal insulation and significant noise reduction to marine craft and offshore installations. Marine Firebatt 2000 has been designed to meet stringent requirements

  • material made of a flexible very low density, fireresistant polyimide foam. It provides not only excellent sound absorption but good thermal insulation, as well as being resilient and lightweight. Usable temperature range is unmatched by other noise control materials ( — 150 C to +

  • and durability. Developed in part under a research grant from NASA, it is now in use in a wide variety of applications, including acoustical and thermal insulation, as fire barriers, vibration damping, and in cryogenic applications. Seeking a thermal insulator and a water vapor barrier that is also flame-res

  • geared to ensuring offshore and vessel operators maintain a safe engine room is Superior Energies Inc. (SEI) of Groves, Texas, a manufacturer of thermal insulation blankets or covers, acoustical blankets and fire proofing blankets or covers for marine, industrial, power generation and engine markets

  • 3 have four hatches on each, with deck No. 4 in holds 2 and 3 having two only. The weatherdeck covers and those on deck 3 incorporate provision for thermal insulation. Chosen for all hatches are covers of the folding type. Those on the weather deck are actuated by external cylinders with the innovative "

  • materials. They are closed cell foams that are designed to provide a variety of functions, such as shock and impact absorption, acoustic sealing, thermal insulation, EMI/RFI shielding and static dissipation in use as gaskets, vibration pads, cushions and mats. Soundfoam CS materials were developed to meet

  • MR Nov-19#80  hulls protect  HIOSL includes thermal imaging sets, 
prepared)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 80

    speci? ed by in Nigeria, and now the boats are being Caterpillar main engines with a cumula- mored ‘citadels’ within the hulls protect HIOSL includes thermal imaging sets, prepared for their assignments. tive 3,579 bkW with each driving a ? xed non-combatants. diesel powered SOLAS fast rescue craft

  • MR Nov-19#57 ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING
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    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    ENVIRONMENTAL GREEN SHIP RECYCLING Furthermore, all of this material can be torious harmful shipbreaking operations, give them business. So there has to be a an actual ship recycling project to ? nd traced downstream to a licenced disposal it appears that the desirability of ship balance. You cannot

  • MN Oct-19#49  – they’re 
to relay video and thermal imaging information on)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 49

    of the port. ? re boats, not only to combat the ? re effectively but also Remote controlled response vessels aren’t coming – they’re to relay video and thermal imaging information on the ? re already here, tackling the three D’s of Dull, Dirty and Dan- origin to incident commanders in real time. gerous

  • MR Sep-19#34 MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA”
transporting bulk ammonia)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA” transporting bulk ammonia over long degrees Celsius. LPG carriers usually of either the refrigeration system or the atmospheric pressure or at normal am- distances. These vessels maintain their transport between 15,000 and 85,000 primary barrier. bient temperatures at

  • MT Jul-19#22  riser buoyancy, thermal insulation, cable protection)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 22

    provides introduced in the early part of 2019. buoyancy, elastomer and composite solutions including drilling and distributed riser buoyancy, thermal insulation, cable protection, bend The Tech restrictors, stiffeners and riser protection guards. Installers and opera- Sea Sentry is an exhaust gas scrubber

  • MT Sep-19#39  (including thermal imaging),  ducted from)
    September 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 39

    , attitude, heave and velocity. satellite communications systems), The Miller pipeline survey was con- HQTXLULHV#EOXHSULQWVXEVHDFRP cameras (including thermal imaging), ducted from just 2.5m water depth VRXQGE\GHVLJQ and navigation lights. It’s able to com- to 40m depth over a 4.75km section municate

  • MR Aug-19#69 . “It can  integrating thermal cutting ProCAD design)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 69

    ? les that are needed,” John Tutino, includes HGG’s exclusive ProCAM software suite, HGG Sales Manager for the America, explains. “It can integrating thermal cutting ProCAD design, ProGram handle ? at bars, bulbs and angles as well as tubular pipes.” work preparation coordination and HGG’s internationally

  • MR Aug-19#68  Software Suite, integrating thermal cutting 
HGG ProCAD design)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    HGG UPC 450 Ship Pro? ler offers full Jetstream process cutting integration through the HGG Pro- Saint-Gobain Abrasives CAM Software Suite, integrating thermal cutting HGG ProCAD design, HGG ProGRAM work Cruise Ship Waterblasting preparation coordination, and HGG’s internation- Norton BlazeX Fiber Discs When

  • MR Aug-19#42  we have  erator sets and thermal oil boiler are also 
been)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    such as diesel gen- list of 23 tankers. Most of them have has enjoyed this record run, it eyes the already been delivered while we have erator sets and thermal oil boiler are also been continuing the building activities considered to be integrated to the emis- been con? gured with different types of future

  • MN Aug-19#86  regulations also place ex-
Thermal Spray Facility. The shop)
    August 2019 - Marine News page: 86

    of the ocean. Cramped in- Tri-State Coating takes great pride in being a complete stallation spaces and strict safety regulations also place ex- Thermal Spray Facility. The shop includes a complete Ma- traordinary demands on installation. Viega provides reliable chine Shop Department, complete Grinding

  • MR Jul-19#55  against oxidization and thermal 
the SCR system whenever)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    contents up to will allow the ship’s crew to manually “pause” is a 20 BN oil that has been tested speci? cally 1%, protecting against oxidization and thermal the SCR system whenever operating outside of a for use in medium speed engines using fuels that degradation and minimizing lacquering. controlled

  • MR Jul-19#45 T
TECH FILES FUTURE FUELS
Rendering of a bulk 
carrier for)
    July 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    T TECH FILES FUTURE FUELS Rendering of a bulk carrier for the trans- portation of lique? ed hydrogen by Moss Maritime, Wilhelmsen Ship Management, Equinor, and DNV-GL. Photo credit: Moss Maritime. fjords, Svalbard, the austere arctic island ing capability. CAPEX and OPEX” said Mr. Skogan. A

  • MN Jul-19#57  range of davits designed to  Thermal Dynamics, an ESAB 
completely)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 57

    making it easier to maneuver and Davit Range 58 Plasma Cutter advance the ? re hose; assisted or A new range of davits designed to Thermal Dynamics, an ESAB completely unassisted. increase safety and reduce corrosion brand, announced that its Cutmas- wkblocker2@sc.rr.com of

  • MN Jul-19#45 FIRE SAFETY
(*) all images courtesy Ramtech
of our WES)
    July 2019 - Marine News page: 45

    FIRE SAFETY (*) all images courtesy Ramtech of our WES Hotspot, a new technology that monitors to operate and isolate the supply (via a current imbalance) electrical installations and equipment, alerting nominated ignition would have already occurred. personnel on-board to the risk of an electrical ? re

  • MT May-19#50 hrysaor is a new operator on the UK Continental  soon as)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 50

    hrysaor is a new operator on the UK Continental soon as it falls below 48°C the wax falls out,” says Emily Ead- Shelf. Only about 18 months old, it’s got growth ington, Wells & Subsea Projects Manager, at Chrysaor. “When ambitions, after ? rst acquiring a package of assets the line was installed in 1992

  • MT May-19#16  
temperature of the Hydro-
thermal vent
Image: Schmidt Ocean)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 16

    the re? ection of the ROV SuBastian in the eye of this octopus. Inset: In the Control Room Below: SuBastian measuring the temperature of the Hydro- thermal vent Image: Schmidt Ocean Institute Image: Schmidt Ocean Institute May 2019 16 MTR MTR #4 (1-17).indd 16 4/25/2019 9:02:49 A

  • MR May-19#31  
real-time streaming and thermal imaging 
over a mobile)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 31

    Black Diamond Advanced Technologies reportedly pre- sented the SkyRanger to the US Marine Corp with a TSM radio that enabled real-time streaming and thermal imaging over a mobile ad-hoc network, or MA- NET. It’s not known whether any of this technology is being used in Norway. Super drones Drone sales

  • MR May-19#27  from one source.  of a 0D/1D thermal calculation Therma- –)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    design process. On the basis the exhaust gas/turbocharger cladding Also, on board ships electri? cation is be- tem – all from one source. of a 0D/1D thermal calculation Therma- – ? rst the prototype – on your engine. coming more and more important. Ther- max de? nes material and thickness of mamax

  • MR May-19#26  design and manufac-
ture of thermal and acoustic insulation)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    , Thermamax, Inc. What is the Thermamax offering to the maritime indus- try? Thermamax is a specialist in the design and manufac- ture of thermal and acoustic insulation solutions for die- sel engines, spark ignited engines, exhaust aftertreatment systems and electric storage systems. Our markets

  • MN May-19#59  it does not 
high-temperature thermal blan-
require electricity)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 59

    exhaust piping, Shannon ate people at altitudes of 6 to 300 manufactures a custom ? t reusable meters. Fully mechanical, it does not high-temperature thermal blan- require electricity or any other power, ket, which, among other things, guaranteeing its operational reliabili- resists chemicals and weather

  • MR Apr-19#54  
Maritime service to deliver 
thermal cutting HGG ProCAD design)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    offers full process which utilizes Intelsat’s Flex cutting integration through the HGG ProCAM Software Suite, integrating Maritime service to deliver thermal cutting HGG ProCAD design, multi-layered Ku-band cover- HGG ProGRAM work preparation co- ordination, and HGG’s internationally recognized 3D plasma

  • MT Mar-19#63  with a FLIR imager for thermal front mapping. 
They)
    March 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 63

    payload system allows operators to ? y multiple missions using a single aircraft. The MBARI operators used this drone combined with a FLIR imager for thermal front mapping. They also used very high-resolution cameras and were able to identify animals in the water, in this example jelly? sh, as well as

  • MR Feb-19#45  and ballast pumps, and the thermal 
foot draft, was built)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    tanks to protect the hull for many more years fghting notation. The 112-foot by 44-foot tug has a 22- of service. Cargo and ballast pumps, and the thermal foot draft, was built for escort, ocean towing and ship oil cargo heating system has been entirely overhauled, Photo: Jensen Maritime assist, and

  • MR Feb-19#44  video from a FLIR M400 thermal  secondary control station)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    re- ters, the vessel has been outftted with a the 24-passenger boat includes include Dow Chemical, Enterprise, Phil- al-time video from a FLIR M400 thermal secondary control station on the aft deck, transferring passengers and lips 66, FLNG, and BP. imaging system, as well as live onboard equipped