Oil

  • In the 1930's, the medium-speed diesel engine came into its own as a prime mover in rail, marine, and stationary applications.

    It was soon realized by engine builders and o p e r a t o r s that Medium Viscosity Index (MVI) lube oils had distinct advantages in performance over High V i s c o s i t y Index (HVI) oils in these diesel engines.

    Historically, the preference for MVI lube oils is based primarily upon experience in 2-stroke, medium-speed diesel engines. This preference has carried over to 4-stroke designs also, although the benefits, while evident, are not as pronounced as in the 2-stroke engines.

    The main feature of the MVI lube oil is in the nature of the residual deposits formed in the engine as contrasted with the deposits formed by the HVI lubricants. Additives aside, the difference in the deposit formation by the two types of oil points up the excellent performance of MVI lube oil in service.

    In the infancy of the medium-speed diesel engine, as we now know it, oils were not compounded but were straight blends of refined lubricating oils. Performance of the lubricant was directly related to the base oil.

    It was soon found that MVI oils formed softer, less dense carbon deposits than HVI oils. The deposits formed by the HVI oils were harder, more adhesive, and tended to build up to high levels in deposit-prone areas.

    Deposits from the MVI oils, on the other hand, in addition to being softer tended to slough off and not build up beyond a certain low level as a result of normal engine operation.

    Even in today's modern oils, the carbon deposits reflect the nature of the base oils, MVI or HVI, regardless of the benefits of additives. Thus the benefits of MVI oil still apply, namely softer carbon deposits and less of them. Additive technology has improved the performance characteristics of both oils about equally, and the performance gap of the 1930's still exists.

    The effect of the carbon deposits is most noticeable in scavenging air and exhaust ports in 2-stroke engines and on the top lands and in ring grooves of the pistons in all engines.

    In 2-stroke medium-speed diesels, port blocking is an important factor in performance because of its effect on engine power.

    It is also an economic factor in the downtime and labor expense of port-cleaning operations.

    Deposits formed by MVI lube oils tend to be crumbly, and in the port area will build up to moderate and usually acceptable levels. However, once they attain these levels they are broken off by the normal aspiration of the engine and do not build up further.

    In some instances, the use of MVI oils will eliminate the need for any port cleaning between scheduled overhauls.

    HVI oils form more adhesive and dense carbon deposits in the port areas. These deposits build steadily, and engine aspiration during operation is usually insufficient to maintain them at a low level. These hard, dense deposits are difficult to remove and can require shutdown for laborious hand scraping.

    In one reported instance, Fairbanks Morse Model 38 opposed-piston engines required port cleaning after 1,500 hours operation with HVI oil. Downtime was lengthy and labor costs high. After switching to an MVI oil, the engines, when inspected, had operated in excess of 5,000 hours without portcleaning.

    Intake ports were 100 percent open, exhaust ports 90 percent open.

    Top land and ring groove deposits are the other most prominent points of carbon deposition.

    Here also, the softer, less adhesive deposits of the MVI oil are the least troublesome.

    The deposits are more easily removed by normal engine operation and do not build up to excessive levels on the top lands or in the ring grooves.

    The hard and adhesive HVI oil carbon deposits can, and often do, build up to excessive levels. This causes ring "proudness"; in effect, the deposit prevents the ring from recessing completely into the groove. And, the ring groove fill reduces ring side clearance, which can affect power output, oil consumption, and hydrocarbon emissions adversely.

    This can lead to ring sticking and ring breakage. In extreme cases in 2-stroke diesels, it also may cause port scalloping.

    Excessive carbon buildup on the top land of the piston caused by HVI lube oil can reduce clearances sufficiently to prevent combustion pressures from pushing rings against the cylinder liner normally for sealing. Again, the result is poor performance — power loss and increased oil consumption. In extreme cases, these land deposits also can cause excessive bore wear or "bore polishing." In this instance, in either 2-stroke or 4-stroke diesels, a power pack replacement can become necessary.

    The modern MVI lube oil is a far cry from the simple non-compounded oils of the 1930's.

    Additive technology has produced long-life oils with dispersant action to keep engines clean by keeping contaminants in suspension in the oil rather than depositing out on engine surfaces. High alkalinity (TBN-E) and excellent alkalinity retention help neutralize corrosive combustion products to reduce corrosive wear. Oxidation inhibitors and corrosion inhibitors protect both oil and engine.

    Filters last longer.

    Today's MVI lube oil provides the same advantages as its predecessor MVI oils in forming carbon deposits that are soft and friable; a benefit of an all-neutral oil. And, because of additives, many MVI oils can be used without change in 2-stroke diesels if their condition is closely monitored by a used-oil analysis program. Changing oil based on analysis will maximize oil life in all engine types.

    Projected availability of napthenic MVI lube stocks is shown in Figure 1, along with projected demand. About 1984/1985, total MVI lube stocks will be unable to fill the demand for conventional MVI oil applications.

    The switch from MVI to HVI base oils is already in progress. Overall, MVI lube stock availability is expected to decline by about 50 percent by 1990.

    Shell Oil Company presently manufactures MVI oil at its Martinez, Calif., refinery.

    This is the only Shell refinery currently producing MVI lube oils. However, in Texas, Shell has another source of MVI lube crude.

    To make this crude available as MVI lube oil, Shell is building a new addition to its Deer Park, Texas, plant. This expansion project is scheduled for completion by the end of 1980 and will more than double the company's supply of MVI lube oil. A further expansion of the Deer Park plant is already scheduled for 1984/1985, which will provide an additional 30 percent capacity.

    In addition to increased MVI base oil supply, distribution East of the Rockies will be facilitated by the plant expansions.

    Shell believes that the majority of engine builders and operators will prefer to operate engines with MVI lube oils for as long as possible. The successful use of these oils in medium-speed diesels is documented by a long history of successful performance. It behooves the operator to conserve present supplies as much as possible to help the future supply position.

    With modern high quality MVI lube oils having the capability of extremely long oil life, with good engine protection, the implementation of a used-oil analysis program can be helpful in determining when (or even if ever) oil needs changing. In addition, such an analysis program is a useful maintenance tool when trace metals analysis is included.

    With such a program, oil is changed only when necessary, if at all. This saves valuable MVI lube crude reserves, and can save money. It also can help detect engine problems and avert untimely breakdowns that can be costly.

    With the additional MVI lube supply being placed in the market by Shell Oil Company's expansions, and operator conservation (such as that outlined above), the crossover point on Figure 1, demand exceeding supply, can possibly be extended

  • to burn heavy residual fuels with high sulfur content, has placed increasing demands on the petroleum industry to improve their products. The oil producers have responded by offering new and reformulated marine lubricants, including highly alkaline cylinder oils to protect against the acidity

  • No two oil spill response operations are the same.  Each can present new and even tougher challenges for spill responders as they detect, contain and recover spilled oil. Diverse aspects affecting oil spill response operations can be the physical environment, spill monitoring, use of chemical dispersants

  • Engine Maintenance trumps a tough economy. Bypass oil filtration technology is one way to get there. For the past several years, ferry service and tugboat operators have had one eye on fuel costs and the other on the economy. But worry as they might, there’s not much, if anything, that operators can do to

  • Castrol Limited International Marine, a Burmah company, is offering a free, recently published 56- page lube oil guide and marine service directory. The fully indexed publication is organized into six main sections— "Important Information," which covers some pertinent company policies; "Castrol

  • A revolutionary new commercial waste oil dehydrator is presently beginning "on stream" operations after its recent installation on the Houston Ship Channel. The new, multi-effect dehydrator will be operated by Oil Processors of Texas under a franchised lease agreement covering virtually all of the Gulf

  • B.R. Martin has been named president of Korea Gulf Oil Company, according to R.W. Baldwin, president of Gulf Refining & Marketing Company (GORAM). Mr. Martin replaces S.K. Mc- Walter, who is returning to Gulf Oil Canada, Ltd. He will represent Gulf Oil Corporation in all aspects of its business in

  • Spill Response: Elastec’s Grooved Skimming Technology   Cleaning up marine oil spills can be a challenge as there are various types of oil spilled but only a few effective recovery methods. The three main technologies for oil spill recovery for inland and offshore waters are mechanical, insitu burning

  • "Due to increasing demand and reducing reserves, oil prices currently at $40 are likely to soon enter a period of sustained rises resulting in a need to massively develop natural gas and renewable energy resources" according to John Westwood of energy analysts Douglas-Westwood. "Oil reserves are

  • In general the floating production sector looks healthy and growth remains strong. But the sudden expansion of shale oil and tight oil production could disrupt the growth trajectory in the deepwater sector. Deepwater The underlying drivers for deepwater development point toward continued sector growth.

  • How Ester-Based Oils Handle Hydrolysis to Remain the Top EAL for VGP When the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the new Vessel General Permit (VGP) in December 2013, lubricant and fluid manufacturers were prepared to give vessel owners a number of environmentally acceptable lubricants (EAL) to

  • A delegation of French maritime experts recently visited Oil Mop, Inc. headquarters, Belle Chasse, La. 70037, to learn more about cleaning up oil spills under adverse sea, weather and shore conditions. The Frenchmen visited New Orleans on a tour sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard as part of the U.S.

  • MR Nov-19#83  cost-saving advan- ous offshore oil installations.  All equip-
)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    .S. Navy, NOAA, and vari- MacGregor, part of Cargotec, com- pleted the construction of FibreTrac, the the most signi? cant cost-saving advan- ous offshore oil installations. All equip- ? rst ? ber-rope offshore crane to enter the tages seen in decades. FibreTrac is able ment is manufactured in the U.S

  • MR Nov-19#81  sponsor, 
The very large crude oil carrier (VLCC) 
The submarine)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 81

    former Second Lady of Scrubber Delivered tric Boat. More than 10,000 shipbuilders from the United States and the ship’s sponsor, The very large crude oil carrier (VLCC) The submarine is the second ship to be Newport News and Electric Boat have during a ceremony in October 2018. Tanzawa, the ? rst

  • MR Nov-19#80  Nigeria’s coastal and offshore oil  of Homeland’s clients)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 80

    nm in and ity and cost effectiveness to the bene? t pair of FCS 3307 high-spec include Damen’s trademark Axe Bow around Nigeria’s coastal and offshore oil of Homeland’s clients. The decks allow patrol vessels to be operated hull form that is designed to deliver ex- ? elds. The security packages installed

  • MR Nov-19#79 , 35 knot vessel fea-
Fuel Oil  4914 gallons / 18 600)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 79

    14 ft./4.25 m sel built for the operator by Richardson Devine Construction Marine grade aluminium Marine. The 500-passenger, 35 knot vessel fea- Fuel Oil 4914 gallons / 18 600 liters tures the operator’s trademark parallel boarding Fuel Oil (Day tanks) 1057 gallons / 4 000 liters system, whereby ?

  • MR Nov-19#78  Sovcom?  ot to transport crude 
oil for the Novy Port project)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 78

    Laza- rev, a prominent Russian admiral and explorer known for his discovery of Antarctica. The tanker was ordered by Sovcom? ot to transport crude oil for the Novy Port project, under a long-term agreement between Sovcom? ot and Gazprom Neft. The ceremony was attended by Oleg Melnikov, Vice-Gov- ernor

  • MR Nov-19#75  gas. Consisting 
ADL 40 engine oil for Color Hybrid, Color)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 75

    Plug-In Hybrid for CEMS applications where condensed wa- ExxonMobil is supplying Mobilgard ter is not present in the ? ue gas. Consisting ADL 40 engine oil for Color Hybrid, Color of a stack-mounted probe and separate con- Line’s latest addition to its ? eet of ferries. trol unit, 4650-PM’s forward scattering

  • MR Nov-19#72  were lower 
low sulfur fuel oil (LSFO), but this will )
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 72

    are switching to more expensive than HSFO, the poten- levels of re? ning required for LSFO and While the car’s emissions were lower low sulfur fuel oil (LSFO), but this will tial savings (i.e. savings gained from other distillates (such an upgrade would in GHGs, once the full production pro- mean

  • MR Nov-19#71  company that is 
part of an oil company, our pri-
mary)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 71

    S SHIPMANAGEMENT FLAG “As a shipping company that is part of an oil company, our pri- mary role is managing marine risk, our secondary role is trans- porting oil.” Steve Herron, GM of Fleet Operations, Chevron Shipping Photo: Chevron and develop. A certain trust has devel- tal regulations adopted by the

  • MR Nov-19#70   The business of transporting oil for  national Maritime)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    ron Shipping. shaping global regulations at the Inter- Cand more, shipowners are de- ping companies make decisions that lead The business of transporting oil for national Maritime Organization (IMO), manding high levels of standards from to long-term success. Low taxes and low Chevron is not motivated

  • MR Nov-19#68  is a growing  dustry is a well-oiled machine, and it is  an)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    in- that her organization grows in step with installed, it an issue that everyone is fo- ber of early adopters, there is a growing dustry is a well-oiled machine, and it is an ever-changing industry. “I love being cused on.” reference list, particularly coming out also very adaptable. So if there

  • MR Nov-19#62  the  ‘Swiss army knife’ for the oil industry  The slip joint)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    lift vessel (launched as a kind of positioning. leading the ELICAN consortium which ening, as well as modi? cations to the ‘Swiss army knife’ for the oil industry The slip joint connection was designed has designed and installed a 5MW pro- tank arrangement to enhance the proba- during its boom in 2013)

  • MR Nov-19#46  in key strategic areas, such as oil  The Coast Guard’s icebreaking)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 46

    every Arctic Urgent requirement provider and operator of the U.S. polar ral resources there,” said Coast Guard nation in key strategic areas, such as oil The Coast Guard’s icebreaking ? eet capable ? eet but currently does not have Vice Commandant Adm. Robert Ray, and gas development, ports, railways

  • MR Nov-19#45  land  in extracting minerals, oil and gas.  Sea- “As the)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    , and the military, as well as interest icebreaker. communications, and comprehensive eight countries that have territorial land in extracting minerals, oil and gas. Sea- “As the region continues to open and Maritime Domain Awareness. In order to or seas above the Arctic Circle or in the food is a multi-billi

  • MR Nov-19#37  to another level. 
transfer oil across the interface between)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    , you have to circulate heat It’s kind of like Subchapter M. Early on we identi? ed was a lot of potential to take those to another level. transfer oil across the interface between the barge and our gaps and started to address them to make an easier the tug. I worked with a naval architect to help

  • MR Nov-19#36  I was the Damage Control As-
oil storage depot in New York)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    started in the energy industry at 16 working at an The company that I was running was bought by Hous- When I left the vessel I was the Damage Control As- oil storage depot in New York Harbor, working there ton Marine Services, so we moved from the Port Ar- sistant, which was normally an engineering function

  • MR Nov-19#32  dayrates. The marketed 
older oil service vessels in the)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    Financiers also note the overhang of commodations with its lenders. Its daily region for jack-ups again.” utilization and dayrates. The marketed older oil service vessels in the market- business will continue while discussions Privately held Edison Chouest, ac- utilization for both jackups and ? oaters

  • MR Nov-19#30 . 
he fate of Offshore Service  oil, slightly higher (with)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    WORKBOATS THE OSV MARKET CAROLYN CHOUEST: Edison Chouest vessel working Paci? c waters. he fate of Offshore Service oil, slightly higher (with temporary (but slight) jit- for an uptick in 2020 and 2021 with Photos: Iain Cameron Vessels (OSVs) is, natural- nearby at around $60/ ters as an Iranian

  • MR Nov-19#29  
 
is Up?
The environment in oil patches onshore 
and offshore)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    WORKBOATS THE OSV MARKET OSV Market Which way is Up? The environment in oil patches onshore and offshore alike has been challenging throughout 2019; worries about an eco- nomic slowdown – whether cyclical or in- duced by a trade war – have weighed heav- ily on oil prices, even in the face of reduced

  • MR Nov-19#26  interest at Bra- name from Statoil to Equinor last year. )
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    change of the company´s Margareth. Equinor is working system- constant offshore winds present off the IOCs have looked with interest at Bra- name from Statoil to Equinor last year. atically in bettering its energy ef? ciency, coasts of north and northeast Brazil will zil’s clean energy market in search

  • MR Nov-19#15  and/or drafting/
the Louisiana Oil?  eld Anti-Indemnity  tion)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    such agreements are ties can work around the package limita- in the candy bowl meant the venue had in contract negotiation and/or drafting/ the Louisiana Oil? eld Anti-Indemnity tion either by (a) de? ning a package and not read the contract, and there would be reviewing the same can and often does Act

  • MN Nov-19#95  Clarke holds  ocean pollution – oil leaked from con-
2019,)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 95

    growing shipbuilding and work in eliminating a major cause of On Thursday October 17, ship repair operations. Clarke holds ocean pollution – oil leaked from con- 2019, Congressman Elijah E. a Bachelor of Arts degree in econom- ventional oil lubricated tailshafts – has Cummings (MD-07) passed

  • MN Nov-19#28  if the organization transports oil, con-
complete. The additional)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 28

    and procedure development, and L DEGAL EFENSE training can take anywhere from a few weeks to months to It doesn’t matter if the organization transports oil, con- complete. The additional costs associated with developing tainers, dry bulk, or even passengers; waterborne com- November 2019 28 MN MN Nov19

  • MN Nov-19#24 COLUMN OP/ED
tives to meet key oil spill response re- The)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 24

    COLUMN OP/ED tives to meet key oil spill response re- The Network is an Alaska-based nationally-important and ecological- quirements in Alaska and the Arctic. non-pro? t organization funded by ly-sensitive area, and stakeholders’ While ? exibility is normally an asset the maritime industry, and we

  • MN Nov-19#22  years ago, Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act  For example)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    Lower 48 – fail to tion within the maritime industry. provide adequate standards for this last maritime frontier. Almost 30 years ago, Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act For example, OPA 90 has been interpreted by the Coast of 1990 (OPA 90), a signi? cant milestone in regulating oil Guard to allow vessel