Government Of Newfoundland And Labrador

  • Newfoundland and Labrador is preparing the next wave of ocean technology experts
     

    When it comes to the Arctic, the world still has a lot to learn.
    With just 10% of its vast expanse having been charted to date and much about its environment still unknown, the Arctic remains one of the most mysterious places on Earth. As a new frontier with natural resource potential, the Arctic is also an area of increasing international interest and economic activity.
    As activity in the Arctic increases and new opportunities emerge, Newfoundland and Labrador’s academic and training institutions are poised to respond to the rising demand for innovative technology solutions, information, and highly skilled workers. With a successful history of exploring new frontiers, including the Arctic, Newfoundland and Labrador is leading the way in Arctic education and training that will prepare the next generation of innovators and explorers, and that will enable northern communities and Aboriginal peoples to benefit from emerging opportunities.
    At the forefront of this grand undertaking are the Arctic academics, and the best of them can be found on – and off – Newfoundland and Labrador’s shores. Memorial University and its Fisheries and Marine Institute (Marine Institute or MI for short) is home to world-leading cold ocean experts, facilities, and education programs.
    “The Marine Institute is unique in Canada,” says Memorial University Vice President (Marine Institute) Glenn Blackwood. “It is Canada’s Marine Institute. We produce about 70% of all English-speaking seafarers in the country.”
    The Marine Institute, currently celebrating its 50th anniversary, is essentially a polytechnic within Memorial University, offering Diploma, Degree and Masters Degree programs, emphasizing applied research and development and advances in ocean technology, and collaborating with industry and others on the development and application of ocean technology products for all sectors of the maritime community.
    MI is home to the School of Ocean Technology (SOT), Center for Applied Ocean Technology (CTec), Center for Marine Simulation, Center for Sustainable Aquatic Resources, Safety and Emergency Response Training Center, as well as the Offshore Safety and Survival Center.
    “We’re at the early stages of oil and gas development in the province,” says Blackwood. “Especially going deeper in the ocean and further north, which will be largely driven by our ability to access and utilize those resources.”
    This capacity grows day by day, thanks to leading-edge research and development being led by some of the world’s foremost marine technology experts, using some of the world’s most advanced equipment and facilities. MI is home to the largest collection of marine simulators in North America (and perhaps, the world) – 16 in total, including the iconic Full Mission Ship’s Bridge simulator and a seventeenth soon to be added – a deepwater anchor handler simulator.
    Also adding to this growing capacity are ocean technology experts at OCRE (Ocean, Coastal and River Engineering), a division of NRC (National Research Council of Canada). NRC-OCRE is home to world-leading expertise, equipment and facilities, including the world’s longest ice tank, a tow tank, and an offshore engineering basin, along with complex numerical and model testing systems. 
    “We’re physically located on the campus of Memorial University, so we draw a lot of our expertise from Memorial,” explains NRC-OCRE General Manager, Terry Lindstrom, who says that it is this access to qualified people and the facilities in which to nurture them that allows the relatively small province to punch well above its weight in the ocean technology arena.
    “We have a very small footprint, but we have the capabilities, tools, educational background, and the physical bricks and mortar of world-class facilities.”
    With these and other education and training entities operating within the province, collaboration is of the utmost importance. This applies not only to academic institutions, but also extends to government, which plays a key role in facilitating and promoting the province’s advancements, and to industry, where these advancements are utilized.
    “I see it as a propeller with three blades…it doesn’t work without the three of them,” says Glen Blackwood.
    “Industry supports us in many, many ways, through scholarships for students, with a piece of equipment, or a problem we’re working on jointly with them. But the collaborative piece is with government and industry.”
    The Province is very much a part of this combined effort. Through its Arctic Opportunities Initiative (AOI) launched in 2010, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is working with local stakeholders and those in other northern jurisdictions to facilitate partnerships and promote collaboration, environmental responsibility, sustainability and respect, with an overall goal of creating an environment in which all stakeholders can benefit from emerging opportunities in the Arctic, northern communities can thrive, and that will further attract global industry leaders.
    Industry and academia should – and will – continue to take the lead when it comes to progressing interests in the Arctic, while the Provincial Government seeks to provide support, improve international awareness, and facilitate relationships and partnerships.
    Newfoundland and Labrador’s Research and Development Corporation (RDC) is another key asset, working at an arm’s length from Government to assist private enterprise in developing and expanding new technologies for operating in the world’s harshest environments. Through leadership, strategic focus, and investment, and working with R&D stakeholders in business, academia, and government departments and agencies, RDC seeks to strengthen and improve the research system throughout the province. It serves as a catalyst for innovation with the goal of creating economic growth in Newfoundland and Labrador for future generations.

     

    (As published in the January/February 2015 edition of Marine Technology Reporter - http://www.marinetechnologynews.com/Magazine)
     

  • at the table as a key partner in the Province’s Arctic Opportunities Initiative. This initiative is indicative of the high priority the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador has placed on facilitating the province’s strong and undeniable trajectory as a landmark location for Arctic opportunities. Through

  • , to compete competitively in the ship repair market. The C$30-million project was made possible through extensive financial participation by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador in the form of loan guarantees and interest subsidies. The modernization includes a Syncrolift ship elevator, side tran

  • the event. Financial and logistical support for the October meetings was provided by NRC. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Department of Innovation, Business and Rural Development provided financial support, and the City of St. John’s provided logistical

  • the event. Financial and logistical support for the October meetings was provided by NRC. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Department of Innovation, Business and Rural Development provided financial support, and the City of St. John’s provided logistical

  • despite the fact that oil exploration permits cover only one-eighth of our continental shelf which covers 730,000 square miles." The Newfoundland Government official said that offshore oil was but one of the developments which "has placed Newfoundland on the threshold of major social and economic

  • year-round in Labrador where the Anaconda Company is studying the feasibility of a $1- billion aluminum smelter close to where the Newfoundland government plans to build a $4-billion hydroelectric plant

  • and Management. Earlier that day she delivered a presentation to a packed audience outlining a number of NOAA initiatives, with specific insight on government, industry and academia working together to mutual benefit. From the line of industry executives trying to catch her ear after the presentation, I

  • initiatives, some of which are at an advanced stage of development. “Positioning ourselves in Newfoundland is really ideal because we have that government support, we have the facilities, and there are world-class researchers here at the university that we collaborate with,” said David Shea, Engineering

  • With oil and gas reserves equal to the North Sea, a commercial fishing industry expected to triple in size, huge mineral deposits, and extensive hydro-power potential, "the 1980s will be the decade that belongs to Newfoundland and Labrador," according to a new publication, "Newfoundland Opportunity.

  • Vehicles. Front to back, top to bottom, this edition revolves around unmanned underwater vehicles, the means and method which allow many of you to work, study and evolve in the underwater world. In this edition we offer fresh perspective from a broad swath of stakeholders that are directly involved in the

  • called AquaPix leverages nearly two decades of R&D conducted by NATO’s Undersea Research Center and millions of dollars in funding support from NATO government sponsors. Kraken is currently engaged in various stages of technology validation and teaming agreements with leading laboratories and strategic

  • MN Nov-19#30  on the inland riv- NGO and government alike – says that they)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 30

    coverage of cellu- critical connections to a raft of shoreside customers – private, lar communications – both coastwise and on the inland riv- NGO and government alike – says that they have the answer. ers – has long bewitched brown water operators. To be fair, smaller workboats historically haven’t had

  • MN Nov-19#8  the Society 
industry’s and government’s perspective,  of Naval)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    on Arctic and University of New Hampshire and is the Alaska maritime issues from both the regional membership chair of the Society industry’s and government’s perspective, of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers Day Gerhardt ranging from search and rescue, oil spill (SNAME) for New England. prevention

  • MP Q3-19#39  
in English Literature and Government. His articles have 
appeared)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 39

    .” ated from Florida State University with a double major The SPC pipe is comprised of Long, unidirectional fbers are in English Literature and Government. His articles have appeared in myriad maritime publications. combined in a matrix of the same polymer to produce a tape, which www.maritimelogisticspro

  • MP Q3-19#23  threatening to pub-
courages governments to ensure that ships)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 23

    reputation, (IMO) adopted Resolution MSC.428 (98). This instrument en- or disrupting its operations, by publishing (or threatening to pub- courages governments to ensure that ships trading under their lish) sensitive information to obtain the attention of media; or fags address cyber risks in their Safety

  • MP Q3-19#18 , the United State’s federal government’s Congressio-
factors)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 18

    can be worth hundreds of millions of dollars. of material degradation, and ultimately fatigue. While at sea these In 2017, the United State’s federal government’s Congressio- factors cause progressive deterioration of a vessel, affect its service nal Research Service estimated that American-built coastal

  • MP Q3-19#6  themselves at the 
mercy of government policy and regulatory)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 6

    Bulk its bulk Shipping Sectors. As the New Year Shipping To scrub or not to scrub – and why approaches, all bulkers fnd themselves at the mercy of government policy and regulatory pressures. IMO 2020 and the ongoing trade wars could decide whether the latest run of robust LNG BUNKERS WHO’S FUELING

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Lloyd’s Maritime Academy. Government. His articles have appeared)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    academic partners or independently through versity with a double major in English Literature and Vladimir Bibik, IT Lloyd’s Maritime Academy. Government. His articles have appeared in myriad Mark O’Malley, Public Relations maritime publications. Esther Rothenberger, Accounting 3 Llewellyn Bankes-Hug

  • MT Oct-19#35  observing system.  sity and government efforts as well as 
Ten)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 35

    was available to attendees. scienti? c and societal bene? ts of a sus- The exhibits included diverse univer- tained ocean observing system. sity and government efforts as well as Ten years later, over 1,500 members many ocean technology manufactur- of the global ocean observing com- ers. The displays attempted

  • MT Oct-19#31 . A constant haul of government 
environmental and sectoral)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 31

    research and R&D contracts: a mighty offshore oil, gas and shipping value Ship Repair | Conversions | Drydocking chain. A constant haul of government environmental and sectoral reports and by people who care about returning your vessel by people who care about returning your vessel offshore

  • MT Oct-19#30  by means of licens- gian government funding. Yet, the environment)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 30

    research results is part of Nearly all of what was earned in 2000 was actually Norwe- SINTEF’s role in society. We achieve this by means of licens- gian government funding. Yet, the environmental assessments, ing and creating new companies based on technologies devel- materials testing and structural standards

  • MT Oct-19#20  technology and 
try, and government to gather every two)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 20

    position your business attracts individuals and teams belonging to academia, indus- as an innovator and expert within the ocean technology and try, and government to gather every two years to showcase marine science communities. the latest advancements and innovations in the ? eld of marine • With the event’s

  • MT Oct-19#6  
corporations, academia, and government. 
Marine Technology)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 6

    with experience in startups, Industrial Chemistry in 1988. Today he is specializing in energy and environmental corporations, academia, and government. Marine Technology Reporters science and topics. He has been a regular contributor At Just Innovation Inc. he supports clients technology writer

  • MT Oct-19#4  Oslo
to Tom Ewing, a veteran government reporter who contributes)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    Brazil instructive and interesting, if for no other reason, my own edi? cation. I posed the challenge William Stoichevski, Oslo to Tom Ewing, a veteran government reporter who contributes regularly on the maritime side of our ledger, as Tom is quite adept at taking a deep dive into all matters government;

  • MR Oct-19#57  out paper draw-
business in government support for the U.S)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    well as a growing and vibrant Some unique projects of note include the project to to create.” It’s not just about putting out paper draw- business in government support for the U.S. Army incorporate Z-Drives for propulsion on river towboats, ings. We are in the business of creating designs with Corps of

  • MR Oct-19#52  and ?  shing vessels. 
of Government support of shipbuilding)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    end of the war and the curtailment welding changed the design business forever. Initially, of steerable Kort nozzles for tugs and ? shing vessels. of Government support of shipbuilding new steel ships steel was used in the design of vessels for the inland wa- Good ideas, whether developed in BC or imported

  • MR Oct-19#49  needs to 
be driven by government investment. And 
government)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    show a huge amount of promise, but while an individual shipowner can elect to invest in sail, the investment in nuclear needs to be driven by government investment. And government investment in maritime is as rare as a young nation with a small Navy being able to teach the largest Navy in the world

  • MR Oct-19#45  Australia.”  Outside of the government focus, our DLBA business)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    of the US Navy for over 20 years, and will be for another 40-50 years. or for NOAA, Coast Guard, or for Taiwan or Australia.” Outside of the government focus, our DLBA business has been a tremendous addition to the company. The produc- Please discuss your Navy business projections for the tion

  • MR Oct-19#42  to Navy programs 
and other government teams as well.     
)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    shipbuilding indus- try around the world, our detail design and production support capabilities offer a unique perspective to Navy programs and other government teams as well. The U.S. Navy is unique in that it must project decades in advance its operational requirements, while maintaining a focus

  • MR Oct-19#41  naval architecture  augment government program of?  ce and)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    boats to destroyers, I wanted to reassert boat and recreational markets. Domestically, we G&C as the global leader in the naval architecture augment government program of? ce and engineer- and marine engineering industry. Our Board of Di- ing teams in the US Navy, Missile Defense Agency rectors challenged

  • MR Oct-19#27  American help) in 1903. 
government contracts) ?  ourished)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    the landscape. Panama broke free from transit of Panama Canal. ship Company (bene? ting from U.S. Colombia (with some American help) in 1903. government contracts) ? ourished. The When the dust settled, the U.S. controlled a 10-mile Source: U.S.Merchant Marine Academy Maritime Museum stock price

  • MR Oct-19#25  International Institute
•  Government Relations activity
The)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    NACE International Institute • Industry-distinguished contractor accreditation program through the NACE International Institute • Government Relations activity The Worldwide Corrosion Authority® A community for making connections, career development, solving challenges, and advancing

  • MR Oct-19#19  and better  ademia and government to tackle com- could)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    together industry, ac- which this theme might be approached force in a Sea of Constant Disruptors zon to inform current planning and better ademia and government to tackle com- could be economic, political, social or and Change” and stated, “Considering prepare the Coast Guard for an uncertain plex ‘collective

  • MR Oct-19#18  bring together academ-
ics, government and commercial entities)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    Risk Symposium (MRS 2019) Nov. 13-15, 2019, at New York Maritime College located in the Bronx, New York. MRS 2019 will bring together academ- ics, government and commercial entities to discuss the threats, challenges and risks associated with the Marine Trans- portation System with a focus on current

  • MR Oct-19#14  and operator and the government 
to the International)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    vessel and debate, long awaited amendments States to take into account the Guide- state that electronic recordkeeping sys- owner and operator and the government to the International Convention for lines for the Use of Electronic Record tems should be capable of printing out to streamline oversight and