Government Of Newfoundland And Labrador

  • Newfoundland and Labrador is preparing the next wave of ocean technology experts
     

    When it comes to the Arctic, the world still has a lot to learn.
    With just 10% of its vast expanse having been charted to date and much about its environment still unknown, the Arctic remains one of the most mysterious places on Earth. As a new frontier with natural resource potential, the Arctic is also an area of increasing international interest and economic activity.
    As activity in the Arctic increases and new opportunities emerge, Newfoundland and Labrador’s academic and training institutions are poised to respond to the rising demand for innovative technology solutions, information, and highly skilled workers. With a successful history of exploring new frontiers, including the Arctic, Newfoundland and Labrador is leading the way in Arctic education and training that will prepare the next generation of innovators and explorers, and that will enable northern communities and Aboriginal peoples to benefit from emerging opportunities.
    At the forefront of this grand undertaking are the Arctic academics, and the best of them can be found on – and off – Newfoundland and Labrador’s shores. Memorial University and its Fisheries and Marine Institute (Marine Institute or MI for short) is home to world-leading cold ocean experts, facilities, and education programs.
    “The Marine Institute is unique in Canada,” says Memorial University Vice President (Marine Institute) Glenn Blackwood. “It is Canada’s Marine Institute. We produce about 70% of all English-speaking seafarers in the country.”
    The Marine Institute, currently celebrating its 50th anniversary, is essentially a polytechnic within Memorial University, offering Diploma, Degree and Masters Degree programs, emphasizing applied research and development and advances in ocean technology, and collaborating with industry and others on the development and application of ocean technology products for all sectors of the maritime community.
    MI is home to the School of Ocean Technology (SOT), Center for Applied Ocean Technology (CTec), Center for Marine Simulation, Center for Sustainable Aquatic Resources, Safety and Emergency Response Training Center, as well as the Offshore Safety and Survival Center.
    “We’re at the early stages of oil and gas development in the province,” says Blackwood. “Especially going deeper in the ocean and further north, which will be largely driven by our ability to access and utilize those resources.”
    This capacity grows day by day, thanks to leading-edge research and development being led by some of the world’s foremost marine technology experts, using some of the world’s most advanced equipment and facilities. MI is home to the largest collection of marine simulators in North America (and perhaps, the world) – 16 in total, including the iconic Full Mission Ship’s Bridge simulator and a seventeenth soon to be added – a deepwater anchor handler simulator.
    Also adding to this growing capacity are ocean technology experts at OCRE (Ocean, Coastal and River Engineering), a division of NRC (National Research Council of Canada). NRC-OCRE is home to world-leading expertise, equipment and facilities, including the world’s longest ice tank, a tow tank, and an offshore engineering basin, along with complex numerical and model testing systems. 
    “We’re physically located on the campus of Memorial University, so we draw a lot of our expertise from Memorial,” explains NRC-OCRE General Manager, Terry Lindstrom, who says that it is this access to qualified people and the facilities in which to nurture them that allows the relatively small province to punch well above its weight in the ocean technology arena.
    “We have a very small footprint, but we have the capabilities, tools, educational background, and the physical bricks and mortar of world-class facilities.”
    With these and other education and training entities operating within the province, collaboration is of the utmost importance. This applies not only to academic institutions, but also extends to government, which plays a key role in facilitating and promoting the province’s advancements, and to industry, where these advancements are utilized.
    “I see it as a propeller with three blades…it doesn’t work without the three of them,” says Glen Blackwood.
    “Industry supports us in many, many ways, through scholarships for students, with a piece of equipment, or a problem we’re working on jointly with them. But the collaborative piece is with government and industry.”
    The Province is very much a part of this combined effort. Through its Arctic Opportunities Initiative (AOI) launched in 2010, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is working with local stakeholders and those in other northern jurisdictions to facilitate partnerships and promote collaboration, environmental responsibility, sustainability and respect, with an overall goal of creating an environment in which all stakeholders can benefit from emerging opportunities in the Arctic, northern communities can thrive, and that will further attract global industry leaders.
    Industry and academia should – and will – continue to take the lead when it comes to progressing interests in the Arctic, while the Provincial Government seeks to provide support, improve international awareness, and facilitate relationships and partnerships.
    Newfoundland and Labrador’s Research and Development Corporation (RDC) is another key asset, working at an arm’s length from Government to assist private enterprise in developing and expanding new technologies for operating in the world’s harshest environments. Through leadership, strategic focus, and investment, and working with R&D stakeholders in business, academia, and government departments and agencies, RDC seeks to strengthen and improve the research system throughout the province. It serves as a catalyst for innovation with the goal of creating economic growth in Newfoundland and Labrador for future generations.

     

    (As published in the January/February 2015 edition of Marine Technology Reporter - http://www.marinetechnologynews.com/Magazine)
     

  • at the table as a key partner in the Province’s Arctic Opportunities Initiative. This initiative is indicative of the high priority the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador has placed on facilitating the province’s strong and undeniable trajectory as a landmark location for Arctic opportunities. Through

  • , to compete competitively in the ship repair market. The C$30-million project was made possible through extensive financial participation by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador in the form of loan guarantees and interest subsidies. The modernization includes a Syncrolift ship elevator, side tran

  • the event. Financial and logistical support for the October meetings was provided by NRC. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Department of Innovation, Business and Rural Development provided financial support, and the City of St. John’s provided logistical

  • the event. Financial and logistical support for the October meetings was provided by NRC. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Department of Innovation, Business and Rural Development provided financial support, and the City of St. John’s provided logistical

  • despite the fact that oil exploration permits cover only one-eighth of our continental shelf which covers 730,000 square miles." The Newfoundland Government official said that offshore oil was but one of the developments which "has placed Newfoundland on the threshold of major social and economic

  • year-round in Labrador where the Anaconda Company is studying the feasibility of a $1- billion aluminum smelter close to where the Newfoundland government plans to build a $4-billion hydroelectric plant

  • and Management. Earlier that day she delivered a presentation to a packed audience outlining a number of NOAA initiatives, with specific insight on government, industry and academia working together to mutual benefit. From the line of industry executives trying to catch her ear after the presentation, I

  • initiatives, some of which are at an advanced stage of development. “Positioning ourselves in Newfoundland is really ideal because we have that government support, we have the facilities, and there are world-class researchers here at the university that we collaborate with,” said David Shea, Engineering

  • With oil and gas reserves equal to the North Sea, a commercial fishing industry expected to triple in size, huge mineral deposits, and extensive hydro-power potential, "the 1980s will be the decade that belongs to Newfoundland and Labrador," according to a new publication, "Newfoundland Opportunity.

  • Vehicles. Front to back, top to bottom, this edition revolves around unmanned underwater vehicles, the means and method which allow many of you to work, study and evolve in the underwater world. In this edition we offer fresh perspective from a broad swath of stakeholders that are directly involved in the

  • called AquaPix leverages nearly two decades of R&D conducted by NATO’s Undersea Research Center and millions of dollars in funding support from NATO government sponsors. Kraken is currently engaged in various stages of technology validation and teaming agreements with leading laboratories and strategic

  • MT Apr-19#56 Products Imaging
SubC Imaging Remote Ocean Systems SIDUS)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    Products Imaging SubC Imaging Remote Ocean Systems SIDUS Solutions, LLC ROS is an ISO-9001-2008 certi? ed company with a 28,000 sq. ft. research and manufacturing facility dedicated to producing products. Its product line includes underwater video cameras, lights, rugged pan and tilt positioning

  • MT Apr-19#52  coastlines are at sea level 
governments and international bodies)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    spared. This is vital sights into the changing ocean dynamics. Through the years, especially for island nations whose coastlines are at sea level governments and international bodies have established global and heavily populated. ocean observation systems to foster collaborative work toward Several

  • MT Apr-19#45  technology. gian government will offer would-be)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 45

    negotiations with clients for By pumping cash into innovation at the Center, the Norwe- new, customized cable designs and installation technology. gian government will offer would-be wind suppliers from “Our business plan is based on this being our major income around the world access to the Unitech ? oating

  • MT Apr-19#38  vehicle equipped with  government’s ?  rst commercial)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 38

    the aegis of the EU is the fact, early in 2018, Swire Seabed had begun the Norwegian UX-1 (prototype) or UX-1b, a spherical vehicle equipped with government’s ? rst commercial cruise to map marine mineral lasers to help mining vehicles navigate and mining companies resources of copper, lead and silver

  • MT Apr-19#37  of mining companies, governments, rich subsea players)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 37

    , remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROV) and new “drones” called HROV, DART or TURTLE. Among the indicators is the involvement of mining companies, governments, rich subsea players and a Dutch dredging community. New vehicles are being developed from Hungary to Hawaii, although Portugal, it seems, is

  • MT Apr-19#11  permission from the U.S. government agency with ju- You)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 11

    , CA: (949) 660-0144 cannot be transferred or transshipped by the foreign buyer o Santa Clara, CA: (408) 998-8806 without permission from the U.S. government agency with ju- You can email your question to: ECDOEXS@bis.doc.gov risdiction over the licensed item. If you ? nd out that the item has been resold

  • MT Apr-19#10 Insignts Government Update
Export Licensing: 
Tips U.S.)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 10

    Insignts Government Update Export Licensing: Tips U.S. Exporters Shouldn’t Overlook Export Control Lists Include Key Marine Tech Categories By Curt Cultice, U.S. Commercial Service, U.S. Department of Commerce ach year, the U.S. Department of only complete systems and key parts and com- Commerce receives

  • MT Apr-19#6   corporations, academia, and government. 
aerospace. Driven)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 6

    , Global executive with experience in startups, ranging from oceanographic research to Commercial Environmental Assessment corporations, academia, and government. aerospace. Driven by technical expertise team that focuses on supporting the At Just Innovation Inc. he supports clients and a problem-solving-approa

  • MT Apr-19#4  of industry, academia and government, as its position on)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    Oceanographic Center in Southampton, England, there is arguably no better setting for this PUBLISHER bi-annual meeting of industry, academia and government, as its position on this historic John C. O’Malley campus, on the water in the heart of the Port of Southampton gives to you nearly every jomalley@marin

  • MT May-19#40  of engineering advances and government 
subsidies have conspired)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 40

    ef cient wave-generated power enewable energy production is of? cially ‘hot’, as a Wave-generated power could be number of engineering advances and government subsidies have conspired to help deploy, test, and considered the Rodney Danger- Rprove in real-world conditions the viability of vari- ous systems

  • MT May-19#13  involved in 
SIS) is a government-to-government data sharing)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 13

    state includes AIS data The Maritime Safety and Security Information System (MS- and an analysis of the movements of all vessels involved in SIS) is a government-to-government data sharing network op- the casualty based on that data. Interviews of crew members erated by the Department of Transportation.

  • MT May-19#12 Insignts Government Update
They started installing shore-bas)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 12

    Insignts Government Update They started installing shore-based receivers to monitor AIS the location. By combining AIS data with other information, transmissions from approaching ships, out to a point just such as photos from surveillance aircraft or satellites, correla- beyond the horizon. Those

  • MT May-19#10 Insignts Government Update
AIS DATA
Governments are now)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 10

    Insignts Government Update AIS DATA Governments are now using AIS in an innovative manner by creating virtual aids-to-navigation that provide an AIS signal to mark hazards to navigation in locations where a physical aid-to-navigation does not exist. By Dennis Bryant The Automatic Identi? cation System

  • MT May-19#6  
corporations, academia, and government. 
Greg Folts is Director)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 6

    Authors & Contributors Manley Maslin Paschoa Stoichevski Tena executive with experience in startups, Folts Paschoa corporations, academia, and government. Greg Folts is Director of Business Claudio Paschoa is MTR’s contributor At Just Innovation Inc. he supports clients Development for Maritime

  • MT May-19#2   Tech: New & Notable
10  Government Update: AIS Data
34)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 2

    in just eight months – despite facing multiple issues on the way. By Elaine Maslin 4 Editor’s Note 6 Authors in this Edition 8 Tech: New & Notable 10 Government Update: AIS Data 34 Defense: Brazilian Submarines 38 Defense: French Frigate Tech 54 Product: Comms, Telemetry, Data Processing 58 Product:

  • MR May-19#71 .  Not only the Australian government uses the 
Aussie Pump)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 71

    in both recoil and electric start. The L48 4.8hp Yanmar diesel provides loads of power and the pumps are remarkably ef? cient. Not only the Australian government uses the Aussie Pump product range but, other navies throughout the world, in- cluding the French, Indian, Bangladesh and Sri Lankan are gradually

  • MR May-19#42   Maritime CleanTech and government. 
time clusters.  bedded)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    incubated by integral part of western Norway’s mari- time charged by photovoltaic cells im- “As far as we know, the regulation Maritime CleanTech and government. time clusters. bedded in 5,000 square meters of sails. concerns the so-called Heritage Fjords, As we went to press, the NCE was One of those

  • MR May-19#41  of  It was a 2018 Norwegian government  1,000 GT. The Norwegian)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    , greener tech. on fossil fuels in passenger ships over Wstart at the sea and ter- 10 percent run on bunker; 70 percent of It was a 2018 Norwegian government 1,000 GT. The Norwegian Maritime Au- minate in picturesque villages, where a cloud of exhaust from visiting cruise ships tends to hang. The

  • MR May-19#38  in the fjords of 
by government contract to improve)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    was established by in 1893 The current Hurtigruten ? eet consists added to the Hurtigruten ? eet in the next Amundsen cruising in the fjords of by government contract to improve com- of a number of 12 coastal vessels and 10 years, we’ll be operating in new areas Norway.The ship is due for delivery later

  • MR May-19#16 , keeping wind towers out of  governmental Renewable Energy Task)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    form the California Inter- velopmental mode – meeting with stake- platforms; it’s small, just ? ve turbines. the horizon, keeping wind towers out of governmental Renewable Energy Task holders, creating a new California Off- Equinor is one of the companies which sight from CA’s postcard shorelines. Force

  • MR May-19#10 I
INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE
Dennis L. Bryant 
Dennis)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 10

    I INSIGHTS: GOVERNMENT UPDATE Dennis L. Bryant Dennis Bryant is with Bryant’s Maritime Consulting, and a regular contributor to Maritime Reporter & Engineering News as well as online at MaritimeProfessional.com. dennis.l.bryant@gmail.com AIS Data he Automatic Identi? cation System (AIS) was developed

  • MR May-19#8  to give government person- delays. Olmsted’s)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    ; one which was will be reduced. New locks mean fewer years of underinvestment one of the re- the Harbor Harvest “Farm-to-Harbor-to- supposed to give government person- delays. Olmsted’s two 1200 x 110-foot port’s key conclusions is that we have a Market” service. The goal of the service nel a sense of

  • MR May-19#4  MarTID 2019
10  INSIGHTS  Government Update 68  TECH FILES)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    correspondent in Norway Departments 6 EDITORIAL 64 AUTONOMY Put to the Test 8 OPENING SHOT According to Keefe 66 TRAINING MarTID 2019 10 INSIGHTS Government Update 68 TECH FILES Products 12 INSIGHTS Digitalization 73 TECH FILES Scrubbers & Emissions 16 MARKET Offshore Wind 78 TECH FILES Ballast

  • MN May-19#53  2006 through  president for government relations. 
Hotel in)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    of the Mercury pro- to serve as the company’s senior vice of the Emery Rice Medal at the Plaza peller business. From 2006 through president for government relations. Hotel in New York City. Gallagher’s 2014, Drees led Mercury’s Attwood Roberts’ career in Washington spans 53 www.marinelink.com MN