Europe

  • In all probability, the changes taking place in Europe will have a profound impact on the way ocean carriers do business in the years ahead.

    Of course, no one can predict exactly what the European economy will look like in 1992. While many people expect the European Community to achieve full economic integration, it is unrealistic to assume that one unified market—where goods, services, capital and labor flow unrestrained—will be created by the end of 1992. Policies are still being set, and the true shape the market and its full impact on the business world is largely unknown.

    The exact timetable for Europe aside, we are clearly in a business environment that is taking on global dimensions. Europe is on its way to becoming a four trillion dollar market—that's four thousand billion— made up of 320 million consumers.

    Europe's drive toward a single market is accelerating a move toward the creation of three global trading blocs—North America, Asia and Europe. Gross domestic product in the Common Market will soon rank with that of the U.S.; it is already larger than Japan's.

    Some important steps have already been made as European countries prepare for life after 1992.

    Many of the nearly 300 trade directives are being dismantled, eliminating cumbersome standards and regulatory procedures.

    As we get closer to 1992, one significant development is the possible integration of 12 heterogeneous markets into one large market for goods and services. Companies around the globe will be looking at what could become the largest single customer base in the world.

    We see a number of opportunities and some obstacles for American businesses. The unification of Europe should compel American businesspeople to look at the world as they never have before. After all, what we're seeing in Europe represents the first situation in decades where American companies will not play a leading role in a significant development in world trade. In the next five years, we expect that events in Europe will not have a dramatic impact on trade into and out of the U.S.

    The changes in Europe should make it easier for firms to do business.

    In fact, a U.S. government official recently said that American companies currently operating in Europe will not have to change much and that little, if any, additional investment will be required.

    This might be true in some cases.

    But part of the ground rules for doing business in Europe will change, forcing both European and foreign firms to change the way they do business.

    It's likely that all traditional forms of distribution in Europe will be subject to change. The question is, "Will American companies be on the forefront of this change, or will they be on the outside reacting to the competitive moves of others?" American companies must stay on top of new transportation developments.

    Logistics will become a powerful marketing tool. Foreign firms will no longer be able to survive unless they are constantly aware of both their customers' needs and what the competition is doing.

    Not only must companies know their customers's needs, but they also must know the needs of their customers' customers' in order to fully understand the complete distribution cycle.

    To succeed in Europe, American companies will have to adopt a new approach to doing business. This will not be an easy transition to make. Americans are used to thinking in terms of world trade evolving in the U.S. Now they have to start thinking about how to capitalize on trade opportunities revolving in Europe.

    American businesses planning to expand in Europe must consider forming ventures with their European counterparts. These linkages may take the form of alliances, partnerships or acquisitions, or they may even be start-up companies.

    We must figure out how to wed our strengths with those of European companies. American companies can bring to the table decades of experience in serving one large market. Europeans, on the other hand, can offer both local expertise, and in some cases, a different world perspective.

    So real opportunities in world trade in the near term are going to take place in Europe. However, over the longer term, by 1994 or so, we expect to see greater demand for American products in Europe. Given the marketing experience of U.S.

    firms, the unification of Europe's markets should work to our advantage.

    After all, American companies have more experience than anyone in selling to one large market—our own. And it's easier than earmarking a message specifically for Dutch, French or Italian consumers. But again, we don't see this market growth beginning for three to five years.

    We see a number of opportunities for exporters and carriers who wish to operate throughout Europe. One is increased intermodal traffic throughout the community as shippers find it easier to move their products farther inland. A second opportunity is for increased intra- European trade. This larger volume will invite more competition in each transport mode, as well as between modes.

    In fact, Europe is already taking steps to facilitate the movement of goods around the community. Many observers believe that by 1992, a number of substantial improvements will be made in European transportation infrastructure.

    We would welcome these improvements.

    Europe's infrastructure does not allow for the sophisticated transportation systems we have in the U.S. The roads are too narrow and the tunnels too numerous to accommodate heavy trucking.

    Yet about three-quarters of the cargo moved in Europe travels over the road. Nor are the railroads as efficient as they are elsewhere. In fact, goods in Europe travel at an estimated seven miles an hour, compared with an estimated 36 miles an hour in the U.S.

    As we face these developments in Europe and the globalization of the world, it's important that shippers and carriers work together. Carriers need to make more of an effort to understand their customers' needs.

    Customers, on the other hand, should be willing to look at longer term relationships with carriers. By developing a close working relationship, carriers and customers can, through technology and creative approaches to logistics, make a customer's product as competitive as possible in every way—quality, price, and availability.

  • will provide Canadian Pacific with an opportunity to participate in the large and growing volume of trade between the United States and Western Europe to complement its Canada-Europe service now being operated by CP Ships. The other shareholders of Dart Containerline are Compagnie Maritime Beige

  • Two of Europe's important and w e l l - k n o w n repair yards have merged recently. Mercantile Marine Engineering and Graving Docks Company N.V., and Beliard Murdoch S.A., both of Antwerp, have consolidated into one company. Mercantile-Beliard will own and operate eight private drydocks f o r

  • Solus Ocean Systems have made the following executive appointments as the first part of a planned corporate reorganization to transfer the company's Europe and West Africa headquarters from Hounslow, Middlesex to Aberdeen, Scotland. Colin James has been appointed, manager, unmanned submersibles. Prior

  • pressures, long-term data sets are fundamental for monitoring these processes and understanding the complex and vast oceanic environment. In July 2016, the European Marine Board (EMB), a partnership of major national marine and oceanographic institutes in Europe, identified critical gaps within ocean observation

  • Dart, and Manchester Liners have agreed to coordinate on an equal basis the container services they now operate between Canada, the U.K. and Continental Europe. The new coordinated service will employ four cellular container vessels, each of about 1,500-TEU capacity and will use Montreal's Racine Terminal

  • di Navigazione. This comissioning is an important milestone for Izar-Manises Propusion and Energy, because it is the only licensee of Mitsubishi in Europe and because this engine is the first Mitsubishi engine delivered in Europe. The Commercial Manager of Mitsubishi in Europe, Hideo Kihara, the President

  • Organization (GTO), a San Francisco, Calif.- based transportation group, has announced the formation of a firm to operate ro/ro barge service between Europe and Saudi Arabia. The new firm has been named Euro-Arab Sea Trailer (EAST). Leo Collar, GTO's managing director, said that EAST would operate

  • Inc., a global ocean shipping research and information technology firm based in Jacksonville, Fla. Several ocean carriers in the transpacific and Asia/Europe routes made capacity cut-backs in the last three months of 2001. according to the January 2002 World Liner Supply report from ComPair Data, leading

  • Many of Europe’s marine species, habitats and ecosystems have been under threat for decades. As maritime economic activities are predicted to increase in coming years, a new briefing from the European Environment Agency (EEA) argues that the cumulative impact of human activity should be better managed to

  • Spanish shipbuilder and designer IZAR and Rolls-Royce have signed a contract for a new 696- ft. (212-m), 3,400 dwt European High Speed Cargo Vessel (EHSCV), which is intended to be a costeffective short-sea shipping alternative to road transport in Europe. The monohull EHSCV, which will be powered

  • him." Mr. Garrow graduated the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. in 1955. After gradu ation he served for 31 years as a public affairs specialist in Europe, the Far East and both coasts of the U.S. He was chief of information for NATO in Southern Europe, and ended his career in the Navy as its chief

  • MR Jan-20#57  that con?  dence  but up in Europe and in North America from)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    polling the industry for more than a decade regarding current and future trends. According to the latest survey, BDO reports that con? dence but up in Europe and in North America from 5.7 to 6.2 and in the shipping industry rose in the last quarter to its high- from 4.3 to 6.8 respectively. est level for

  • MR Jan-20#56  Shipping  MegaRust 
FPSO Europe  Mar. 31. - Apr. 2 May)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    St, Louis, MO New Orleans, LA www.envirotechforum.com http://inlandmarineexpo.com/ www.underwaterintervention.com/ CMA Shipping MegaRust FPSO Europe Mar. 31. - Apr. 2 May 19-21 Feb. 19-20 Stamford, CT San Diego, CA London UK maritime.knect365.com/cma-shipping/ http://www.navalengineers.org/Sympo- www

  • MR Jan-20#14  vessels built and designed in Europe,   Class has become a)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    interested in this offshore wind market? Looking at the needs of the wind farm installation and support vessels, like the vessels built and designed in Europe, Class has become a resource of technical expertise and while we would like to see new opportunities for greater utili- advisory services around

  • MN Jan-20#60  4-1/2” to 7” diameter, 
and Europe with the system.
while)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 60

    and loop discs in both 7/8” hole and each of its 20 marinas across the UK shock exposure and incident alerts no hole from 4-1/2” to 7” diameter, and Europe with the system. while underway, and ? eet managers and speed change discs from 4-1/2” receive assessments detailing vessel x 5/8”-11 Fastener

  • MN Jan-20#54 . He 
Hägg Named 
business in Europe, in a number of  also)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 54

    Hägg Bean Kolunsarka Gu Puscar Cox Powertrain Kymmene, the largest pulp and paper APM Terminals, North America. He Hägg Named business in Europe, in a number of also spent more than 10 years with Steerprop CEO different roles. From 2013 to 2016 Maersk Line. he was Executive Vice President

  • MN Jan-20#22  sponsored by the European Union (EU). Del- Interferry’s)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 22

    COLUMN FERRY TRENDS consortium sponsored by the European Union (EU). Del- Interferry’s current membership – more than 260 ferry egates heard that the drive train was being prepared for operators and suppliers in 40 countries – is predominantly assembly and testing on land within months. based in North

  • MN Jan-20#21  to Asia, Australia and 
Europe, orders for new ferries)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 21

    only rising demand but also the ? - nancial and environmental need for ultra-ef? cient vessel performance. From North America to Asia, Australia and Europe, orders for new ferries are resurgent among opera- tors of all sizes. Alternatives to fossil fuels have become a recurring fea- ture of the newbuild

  • MP Q4-19#27 r
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r
i
g
u
European Ocean Freight Forwarders and)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 27

    r o d r i g u European Ocean Freight Forwarders and e z Freight Pricing: what you need to know. as an NV OCC since it does not hold out as either a common carrier, are FMC licensed or registered nor does it issue its house bill of lading, and would be acting much NVOCCs. The tariff rate pages like a U

  • MP Q4-19#26  a 
carriers are treating European and other forwarders)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 26

    the last year or so, it has become clearly evident that ocean Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) may have to “purchase” a carriers are treating European and other forwarders differently favorable rate from the unlicensed, unregistered forwarder in Europe Ithan how they deal with U.S. forwarders

  • MP Q4-19#16  durabil- America, Europe and Asia.
ity vital to)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    SOLAS and class somewhat common on major shipping routes throughout North rules, and all offer the compact sizes and harsh-condition durabil- America, Europe and Asia. ity vital to offshore applications. That said, while the bunkering infrastructure has been growing, whether it will be suffcient to support

  • MR Dec-19#39  of Group Logistics, 
tween Europe and China –  are powered)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 39

    ships freighters in the world to be LNG-powered,” said – which will transport cars for the VW Group be- Thomas Zernechel, Head of Group Logistics, tween Europe and China – are powered by an VW. “In addition to the increasing use of LNG identical MAN Energy Solutions’ propulsion so- trucks, conversion of

  • MR Dec-19#36  roll-out on all 37 vessels in 
Europe during 2020. Working side)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    and will be installed on ? ve more Stena Line vessels during the autumn, with the ambition to do a complete ? eet wide roll-out on all 37 vessels in Europe during 2020. Working side by side in this project, Photo: Kongsberg Maritime/Golden Energy Offshore Stena Lines Head of AI Lars Carlsson, and Senior

  • MR Dec-19#32  energy consumption. under the European Commission’s Ho- The)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    of Ellen is funded The Battery System Ellen Main Particulars Yard Soby Shipyard A/S (assembly of the vessel) reduction in energy consumption. under the European Commission’s Ho- The battery system is developed espe- Yard Kedat Sp. zoo (PL) (Hull manufacturer) The E-Ferry project was a ? ve-year rizon 2020

  • MR Dec-19#15  busiest container terminals in Europe, it handles 
plementing)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    varying complex needs, in Belgium, for its Antwerp Gateway. As one of the which makes the challenge of delivering and im- busiest container terminals in Europe, it handles plementing multiple communication networks a two-and-a-half million containers every year. With problematic task. That’s where Rajant’s

  • MT Nov-19#60  3,Houston, TX 
Ofshore Energy Europe- Oct 7- 10, Amsterdam
Ad)
    November 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 60

    Tools & Manipulators Event Distribution Event Distribution Ofshore Northern Seas- Aug 31-Sep 1, Stavanger SNAME Sep 29- Oct 3,Houston, TX Ofshore Energy Europe- Oct 7- 10, Amsterdam Ad Close: Sep 21 Ad Close: Oct 22 OCTOBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER/DECEMBER Ad Close: Nov 21 Ocean Observation: Gliders, Buoys Acoustic

  • MT Nov-19#49  all Dutch Ports including Europe’s  draws the fouling detritus)
    November 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 49

    qual- fering hull cleaning services to vessels The cleaning and suction system then ity in the port and reduces CO2 emis- at all Dutch Ports including Europe’s draws the fouling detritus ashore or sions and fuel costs,” she ado. “The ad- biggest port, the Port of Rotterdam. The onto a barge, where it

  • MR Nov-19#84  safety in the form of the 
Europe’s leading commercial marine)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 84

    , in print, online, eNews and via social media. NABRICO NABRICO sought to deliver both innovation and new standard of winch safety in the form of the Europe’s leading commercial marine FASST Winder Winch. Rather than using a ratchet handle, the and workboat exhibition. new winch incorporates a handle

  • MR Nov-19#63  are far ahead, but  curve, Europe and globally.” But, while)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry. Offshore

  • MR Nov-19#60  vessel. “Offshore wind outside Europe 
these are not the only)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    . It’s about weight and altitude.” But, number of turbines would need to be in- next generation turbines, with blade tips vessel. “Offshore wind outside Europe these are not the only issues, he says. stalled to create the same size farm. But, that might end up as high as 270 meters and China is starting

  • MR Nov-19#58  FLEET
Bigger, Bolder, Heavier
Europe’s offshore wind market)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET Bigger, Bolder, Heavier Europe’s offshore wind market is growing faster than anyone expected, posing a challenge for the existing installation ? eet. By Elaine Maslin hile offshore wind is capacity. Last year, 2.4GW was added ing power into the grid in 2020/21, and

  • MR Nov-19#26  and storing CO² in all  Europe, in Europe alone, these)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    in the United States and investments in solar and wind energy energy interests, producing the oil and ing by capturing and storing CO² in all Europe, in Europe alone, these projects generation. The search of alternative en- gas which the world still needs, but with its operations. are responsible

  • MR Nov-19#14  drafting error is higher 
for Europeans looking to contract)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    (1) give rise to the problem before me or (2) could create a bigger problem for the client in the future. The risk of drafting error is higher for Europeans looking to contract with American companies. While all the par- ties to the transaction may speak the same language, the legal language (and precedent

  • MR Nov-19#6  that embraces the oppor- Europe, it has an amazing potential)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    a generation behind that of Kathleen Hickey [email protected] holder of multiple maritime patents, a long-tenured executive that embraces the oppor- Europe, it has an amazing potential to Sales tunity to think outside the box. deliver both clean energy and a seri- Frank Covella [email protected]

  • MN Nov-19#69  owners mov-
ing over from Europe. 
  www.marinelink.com)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 69

    vessel availability – not to mention set operational stan- dards in the market and secure work with established project owners mov- ing over from Europe. www.marinelink.com MN Nov19 Layout 66-81.indd 69 MN Nov19 Layout 66-81.indd 69 10/28/2019 4:30:39 PM10/28/2019 4:30:39 P