Europe

  • In all probability, the changes taking place in Europe will have a profound impact on the way ocean carriers do business in the years ahead.

    Of course, no one can predict exactly what the European economy will look like in 1992. While many people expect the European Community to achieve full economic integration, it is unrealistic to assume that one unified market—where goods, services, capital and labor flow unrestrained—will be created by the end of 1992. Policies are still being set, and the true shape the market and its full impact on the business world is largely unknown.

    The exact timetable for Europe aside, we are clearly in a business environment that is taking on global dimensions. Europe is on its way to becoming a four trillion dollar market—that's four thousand billion— made up of 320 million consumers.

    Europe's drive toward a single market is accelerating a move toward the creation of three global trading blocs—North America, Asia and Europe. Gross domestic product in the Common Market will soon rank with that of the U.S.; it is already larger than Japan's.

    Some important steps have already been made as European countries prepare for life after 1992.

    Many of the nearly 300 trade directives are being dismantled, eliminating cumbersome standards and regulatory procedures.

    As we get closer to 1992, one significant development is the possible integration of 12 heterogeneous markets into one large market for goods and services. Companies around the globe will be looking at what could become the largest single customer base in the world.

    We see a number of opportunities and some obstacles for American businesses. The unification of Europe should compel American businesspeople to look at the world as they never have before. After all, what we're seeing in Europe represents the first situation in decades where American companies will not play a leading role in a significant development in world trade. In the next five years, we expect that events in Europe will not have a dramatic impact on trade into and out of the U.S.

    The changes in Europe should make it easier for firms to do business.

    In fact, a U.S. government official recently said that American companies currently operating in Europe will not have to change much and that little, if any, additional investment will be required.

    This might be true in some cases.

    But part of the ground rules for doing business in Europe will change, forcing both European and foreign firms to change the way they do business.

    It's likely that all traditional forms of distribution in Europe will be subject to change. The question is, "Will American companies be on the forefront of this change, or will they be on the outside reacting to the competitive moves of others?" American companies must stay on top of new transportation developments.

    Logistics will become a powerful marketing tool. Foreign firms will no longer be able to survive unless they are constantly aware of both their customers' needs and what the competition is doing.

    Not only must companies know their customers's needs, but they also must know the needs of their customers' customers' in order to fully understand the complete distribution cycle.

    To succeed in Europe, American companies will have to adopt a new approach to doing business. This will not be an easy transition to make. Americans are used to thinking in terms of world trade evolving in the U.S. Now they have to start thinking about how to capitalize on trade opportunities revolving in Europe.

    American businesses planning to expand in Europe must consider forming ventures with their European counterparts. These linkages may take the form of alliances, partnerships or acquisitions, or they may even be start-up companies.

    We must figure out how to wed our strengths with those of European companies. American companies can bring to the table decades of experience in serving one large market. Europeans, on the other hand, can offer both local expertise, and in some cases, a different world perspective.

    So real opportunities in world trade in the near term are going to take place in Europe. However, over the longer term, by 1994 or so, we expect to see greater demand for American products in Europe. Given the marketing experience of U.S.

    firms, the unification of Europe's markets should work to our advantage.

    After all, American companies have more experience than anyone in selling to one large market—our own. And it's easier than earmarking a message specifically for Dutch, French or Italian consumers. But again, we don't see this market growth beginning for three to five years.

    We see a number of opportunities for exporters and carriers who wish to operate throughout Europe. One is increased intermodal traffic throughout the community as shippers find it easier to move their products farther inland. A second opportunity is for increased intra- European trade. This larger volume will invite more competition in each transport mode, as well as between modes.

    In fact, Europe is already taking steps to facilitate the movement of goods around the community. Many observers believe that by 1992, a number of substantial improvements will be made in European transportation infrastructure.

    We would welcome these improvements.

    Europe's infrastructure does not allow for the sophisticated transportation systems we have in the U.S. The roads are too narrow and the tunnels too numerous to accommodate heavy trucking.

    Yet about three-quarters of the cargo moved in Europe travels over the road. Nor are the railroads as efficient as they are elsewhere. In fact, goods in Europe travel at an estimated seven miles an hour, compared with an estimated 36 miles an hour in the U.S.

    As we face these developments in Europe and the globalization of the world, it's important that shippers and carriers work together. Carriers need to make more of an effort to understand their customers' needs.

    Customers, on the other hand, should be willing to look at longer term relationships with carriers. By developing a close working relationship, carriers and customers can, through technology and creative approaches to logistics, make a customer's product as competitive as possible in every way—quality, price, and availability.

  • will provide Canadian Pacific with an opportunity to participate in the large and growing volume of trade between the United States and Western Europe to complement its Canada-Europe service now being operated by CP Ships. The other shareholders of Dart Containerline are Compagnie Maritime Beige

  • Two of Europe's important and w e l l - k n o w n repair yards have merged recently. Mercantile Marine Engineering and Graving Docks Company N.V., and Beliard Murdoch S.A., both of Antwerp, have consolidated into one company. Mercantile-Beliard will own and operate eight private drydocks f o r

  • Solus Ocean Systems have made the following executive appointments as the first part of a planned corporate reorganization to transfer the company's Europe and West Africa headquarters from Hounslow, Middlesex to Aberdeen, Scotland. Colin James has been appointed, manager, unmanned submersibles. Prior

  • pressures, long-term data sets are fundamental for monitoring these processes and understanding the complex and vast oceanic environment. In July 2016, the European Marine Board (EMB), a partnership of major national marine and oceanographic institutes in Europe, identified critical gaps within ocean observation

  • Dart, and Manchester Liners have agreed to coordinate on an equal basis the container services they now operate between Canada, the U.K. and Continental Europe. The new coordinated service will employ four cellular container vessels, each of about 1,500-TEU capacity and will use Montreal's Racine Terminal

  • di Navigazione. This comissioning is an important milestone for Izar-Manises Propusion and Energy, because it is the only licensee of Mitsubishi in Europe and because this engine is the first Mitsubishi engine delivered in Europe. The Commercial Manager of Mitsubishi in Europe, Hideo Kihara, the President

  • Organization (GTO), a San Francisco, Calif.- based transportation group, has announced the formation of a firm to operate ro/ro barge service between Europe and Saudi Arabia. The new firm has been named Euro-Arab Sea Trailer (EAST). Leo Collar, GTO's managing director, said that EAST would operate

  • Inc., a global ocean shipping research and information technology firm based in Jacksonville, Fla. Several ocean carriers in the transpacific and Asia/Europe routes made capacity cut-backs in the last three months of 2001. according to the January 2002 World Liner Supply report from ComPair Data, leading

  • Many of Europe’s marine species, habitats and ecosystems have been under threat for decades. As maritime economic activities are predicted to increase in coming years, a new briefing from the European Environment Agency (EEA) argues that the cumulative impact of human activity should be better managed to

  • Spanish shipbuilder and designer IZAR and Rolls-Royce have signed a contract for a new 696- ft. (212-m), 3,400 dwt European High Speed Cargo Vessel (EHSCV), which is intended to be a costeffective short-sea shipping alternative to road transport in Europe. The monohull EHSCV, which will be powered

  • him." Mr. Garrow graduated the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. in 1955. After gradu ation he served for 31 years as a public affairs specialist in Europe, the Far East and both coasts of the U.S. He was chief of information for NATO in Southern Europe, and ended his career in the Navy as its chief

  • MT Apr-19#47  
Event Distribution 
Ofshore Europe 
Underwater Tools & Manipulator)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 47

    disciplines, defense, ofshore energy Publication Date: Thruster Tech: Underwater July 2019 and science. Propulsion Event Distribution Ofshore Europe Underwater Tools & Manipulators Sep 3- 6, Aberdeen, UK Seatrade Ofshore Marine & Workboats Sep 23-25 Abu Dhabi, UAE Ad Close: Oct 22 Ad Close: Sep

  • MT Apr-19#44 n Europe, where offshore turbines heavily dot maritime)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 44

    n Europe, where offshore turbines heavily dot maritime tween wind turbines. The spooling system can also be mount- maps, there’s acknowledged room for innovation in ed as a barge. turbine construction, support shipping and subsea. In- Spooled cable is custom “spun” like yarn from a ? xed or Istallations

  • MT Apr-19#38  also a key out?  tter for this Europe-wide  “This can become)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 38

    the contours of an underwater mine. Impressive- nental shelf (by AUV survey and ROV rock sampling). ly, INESC TEC is also a key out? tter for this Europe-wide “This can become a new market for them (Swire Seabed) research success story that involved 17 consortium partners and possibly for the entire

  • MT Apr-19#37 Mining for AUVs
In Europe, there are sure signs)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 37

    Mining for AUVs In Europe, there are sure signs that underwater mining is the next big market for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROV) and new “drones” called HROV, DART or TURTLE. Among the indicators is the involvement of mining companies, governments

  • MT Apr-19#2   Mining for AUVs 
In Europe there are signs that 
undewater)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 2

    Seabed Intervention Limited is a relatively small business but its goals are ambitious and focused. By Elaine Maslin Markets 36 Mining for AUVs In Europe there are signs that undewater mining is the next big market for AUVs, ROVs and Hybrids. By William Stoichevski Offshore Wind 42 The Making of a

  • MT May-19#62  
Event Distribution 
Ofshore Europe 
Underwater Tools & Manipulator)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 62

    disciplines, defense, ofshore energy Publication Date: Thruster Tech: Underwater July 2019 and science. Propulsion Event Distribution Ofshore Europe Underwater Tools & Manipulators Sep 3- 6, Aberdeen, UK Seatrade Ofshore Marine & Workboats Sep 23-25 Abu Dhabi, UAE Ad Close: Oct 22 Ad Close: Sep

  • MR May-19#83  
EVENT DISTRIBUTION
Offshore Europe: Sep 3-6, Aberdeen, Scotland
Se)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    Equipment FEATURE: FEATURE: THOUGHT THOUGHT Maritime Software Solutions Energy Efciency Systems LEADERSHIP: LEADERSHIP: EVENT DISTRIBUTION Offshore Europe: Sep 3-6, Aberdeen, Scotland Seatrade Europe: Sep 11-13, Hamburg NEVA 2019, Sep 17-19, St. Petersburg Seatrade Offshore Marine & Workboats: Sep 23-25

  • MR May-19#58  
the Americas and Africa to Europe. A  and McLaren Engineering)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    by Seattle based RoPax vessels. They occur from Asia to Damen Group, FRS, EA Mechanics Without making excuses for the poor the Americas and Africa to Europe. A and McLaren Engineering. With a tight safety record of Bangladeshi ferries, naval architect John W. Waterhouse, of Elliott Bay Design Group

  • MR May-19#37 , Svalbard, Iceland, Western Europe, and the Americas. In)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 37

    more than 30 countries ranging across the globe from the Arctic to the Antarctic and including cruises in Norway, Greenland, Svalbard, Iceland, Western Europe, and the Americas. In an exclusive interview with Maritime Reporter and Engineering News, Dan Skjeldam, the company’s CEO, emphasizes the need for

  • MR May-19#35  route from Asia to Northern Europe  LNG carriers, container)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 35

    ordered and delivered and is used on to the main engine, including the pilot ber and their attachments are replaced. East route from Asia to Northern Europe LNG carriers, container ships and bulk oil module, and the auxiliary engines In addition, the injection components for through the Suez Canal.

  • MR May-19#18  readied for operation in Europe  like in NY and Virginia)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    of a wind energy supply chain, that, after three years, is just now at the af? liated activities are under state and being readied for operation in Europe like in NY and Virginia, the spokesper- starting point. Romero concurred that even local jurisdictions. in 2021. RCEA also selected Aker So- son

  • MN May-19#52  
currently used throughout Europe, Australia and South 
America)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 52

    LA Pilots for design quality and reliable performance, particularly in more extreme environmental conditions. This smaller boat currently used throughout Europe, Australia and South America delivers the same consistent performance as the larger boats to the US mid-sized market. The boat features a twin chine

  • MN May-19#25 .S. 
is nonexistent compared to Europe’s 
multi-modal connectivity)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 25

    modes of shipping, but the 137,000-mile rail- road network doesn’t reach everywhere and the political capital in the U.S. is nonexistent compared to Europe’s multi-modal connectivity. In some of our coastal counties, there isn’t even one mile of continuous rail and there are numerous gaps between our

  • MP Q1-19#48     Website Phone#
5  Breakbulk Europe     www.europe.breakbulk)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    Advertiser Index Page Company Website Phone# 5 Breakbulk Europe www.europe.breakbulk.com Visit our website C2 CPE Certi?ed Port Executive www.certi?edportexecutive.com (902) 425-3980 31 Hans Kuenz GmbH www.kuenz.com +43 5574 6883 0 3 Kalmar www.kalmarglobal.com Please visit us

  • MP Q1-19#45  carrier services to Asia, Europe and the Mediter-
data)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 45

    and CEO. “We anticipate further growth, as the diligent folks at Descartes Datamine, one of the best maritime direct all-water carrier services to Asia, Europe and the Mediter- data crunchers on the planet. ranean attract larger vessels.” Notably, the top 10 ports are the same for 2018. But the actual Houston

  • MP Q1-19#43  year because 
Irier’s northern European customers’ needs these)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 43

    full one. A large transported to China for export cargo. None of the car- number of containers are repositioned empty every year because Irier’s northern European customers’ needs these contain- of failed attempts to ?nd a new transport stretch. This comes at an ers to ship goods to China. So, the carrier

  • MP Q1-19#34  and 
other analysts – project Europe will be in deficit on)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 34

    USA is expected to have the largest sup- ply surplus and export potential, followed by China and Russia. Conversely, we – and other analysts – project Europe will be in deficit on 0.1%/0.5% supply; also, and critically, the Pacific region that includes Singapore, although increasing intake into Asia of

  • MP Q1-19#20  trade relations and Brexit in Europe  novative ways to become)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 20

    economic environment. The issues be- As a result container shipping companies need to look at in- tween the US and China over trade relations and Brexit in Europe novative ways to become more ef?cient and streamline their are testing the industry, plus increased regulations and market operations to remain

  • MP Q1-19#16 . markets, a lesser presence in Europe, a few sites in Vietnam)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    in order to remain Today, Tideworks boasts deep penetration into the Latin America competitive in the global supply chain. markets, a lesser presence in Europe, a few sites in Vietnam, and Thomas Rucker is the president of Tideworks Technology, a of course, the United States. title he has held since 2017

  • MR Apr-19#38  our part- a busy stretch of Europe’s coast, but those waters)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    to monitor and protect is within Peru, and 60 percent of the country is Amazo- to coordinate and collaborate effectively with our part- a busy stretch of Europe’s coast, but those waters are nian rainforest. ner navies in the region, such as Indonesia, Thailand, also full of offshore wind farms, with hundreds

  • MR Apr-19#25 ,  offshore wind in the U.S., Europe and Asia, it is easy to)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    of Aker When we look at the fundamentals and large potential for Solutions’ strategic position in the global wind industry, offshore wind in the U.S., Europe and Asia, it is easy to be business and subsequent project development as well as inspired by the IRENA projection of 500 GW by 2050. wind engineering

  • MR Apr-19#18   27.8%  20.9% 100.0%
Northwest Europe  18.3%  31.7%  8.7%  6)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    38.2% 27.3% 28.8% 29.1% 19.5% 31.6% Persian Gulf 25.5% 22.5% 12.2% 8.3% 15.7% 38.5% Gulf of Mexico 41.3% 48.2% 60.6% 27.8% 20.9% 100.0% Northwest Europe 18.3% 31.7% 8.7% 6.4% 7.0% 9.3% West Africa 30.8% 37.2% 23.9% 13.5% 8.3% 72.7% Grand Total 33.1% 29.4% 21.3% 18.8% 15.6% 17.2% 18 Maritime

  • MR Apr-19#4  structures with the ABS Europe Division 
Web: www.marinelink)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 4

    for Email: mrcirc@marinelink.com Edward Lundquist is a retired naval of? cer who writes on naval, marine and offshore structures with the ABS Europe Division Web: www.marinelink.com maritime, defense and security issues. He is a regular contribu- in London, and the ABS Americas Division and

  • MN Apr-19#29  wind farms throughout Europe. “The design and ultimate)
    April 2019 - Marine News page: 29

    ARCTIC OPERATIONS Offshore wind farms Credit: US Bureau of Offshore Energy Management already applied for: wind sector, servicing wind farms throughout Europe. “The design and ultimate construction of these vessels Continuing that leadership from the Continent, last will result in signi? cant job creation