Europe

  • In all probability, the changes taking place in Europe will have a profound impact on the way ocean carriers do business in the years ahead.

    Of course, no one can predict exactly what the European economy will look like in 1992. While many people expect the European Community to achieve full economic integration, it is unrealistic to assume that one unified market—where goods, services, capital and labor flow unrestrained—will be created by the end of 1992. Policies are still being set, and the true shape the market and its full impact on the business world is largely unknown.

    The exact timetable for Europe aside, we are clearly in a business environment that is taking on global dimensions. Europe is on its way to becoming a four trillion dollar market—that's four thousand billion— made up of 320 million consumers.

    Europe's drive toward a single market is accelerating a move toward the creation of three global trading blocs—North America, Asia and Europe. Gross domestic product in the Common Market will soon rank with that of the U.S.; it is already larger than Japan's.

    Some important steps have already been made as European countries prepare for life after 1992.

    Many of the nearly 300 trade directives are being dismantled, eliminating cumbersome standards and regulatory procedures.

    As we get closer to 1992, one significant development is the possible integration of 12 heterogeneous markets into one large market for goods and services. Companies around the globe will be looking at what could become the largest single customer base in the world.

    We see a number of opportunities and some obstacles for American businesses. The unification of Europe should compel American businesspeople to look at the world as they never have before. After all, what we're seeing in Europe represents the first situation in decades where American companies will not play a leading role in a significant development in world trade. In the next five years, we expect that events in Europe will not have a dramatic impact on trade into and out of the U.S.

    The changes in Europe should make it easier for firms to do business.

    In fact, a U.S. government official recently said that American companies currently operating in Europe will not have to change much and that little, if any, additional investment will be required.

    This might be true in some cases.

    But part of the ground rules for doing business in Europe will change, forcing both European and foreign firms to change the way they do business.

    It's likely that all traditional forms of distribution in Europe will be subject to change. The question is, "Will American companies be on the forefront of this change, or will they be on the outside reacting to the competitive moves of others?" American companies must stay on top of new transportation developments.

    Logistics will become a powerful marketing tool. Foreign firms will no longer be able to survive unless they are constantly aware of both their customers' needs and what the competition is doing.

    Not only must companies know their customers's needs, but they also must know the needs of their customers' customers' in order to fully understand the complete distribution cycle.

    To succeed in Europe, American companies will have to adopt a new approach to doing business. This will not be an easy transition to make. Americans are used to thinking in terms of world trade evolving in the U.S. Now they have to start thinking about how to capitalize on trade opportunities revolving in Europe.

    American businesses planning to expand in Europe must consider forming ventures with their European counterparts. These linkages may take the form of alliances, partnerships or acquisitions, or they may even be start-up companies.

    We must figure out how to wed our strengths with those of European companies. American companies can bring to the table decades of experience in serving one large market. Europeans, on the other hand, can offer both local expertise, and in some cases, a different world perspective.

    So real opportunities in world trade in the near term are going to take place in Europe. However, over the longer term, by 1994 or so, we expect to see greater demand for American products in Europe. Given the marketing experience of U.S.

    firms, the unification of Europe's markets should work to our advantage.

    After all, American companies have more experience than anyone in selling to one large market—our own. And it's easier than earmarking a message specifically for Dutch, French or Italian consumers. But again, we don't see this market growth beginning for three to five years.

    We see a number of opportunities for exporters and carriers who wish to operate throughout Europe. One is increased intermodal traffic throughout the community as shippers find it easier to move their products farther inland. A second opportunity is for increased intra- European trade. This larger volume will invite more competition in each transport mode, as well as between modes.

    In fact, Europe is already taking steps to facilitate the movement of goods around the community. Many observers believe that by 1992, a number of substantial improvements will be made in European transportation infrastructure.

    We would welcome these improvements.

    Europe's infrastructure does not allow for the sophisticated transportation systems we have in the U.S. The roads are too narrow and the tunnels too numerous to accommodate heavy trucking.

    Yet about three-quarters of the cargo moved in Europe travels over the road. Nor are the railroads as efficient as they are elsewhere. In fact, goods in Europe travel at an estimated seven miles an hour, compared with an estimated 36 miles an hour in the U.S.

    As we face these developments in Europe and the globalization of the world, it's important that shippers and carriers work together. Carriers need to make more of an effort to understand their customers' needs.

    Customers, on the other hand, should be willing to look at longer term relationships with carriers. By developing a close working relationship, carriers and customers can, through technology and creative approaches to logistics, make a customer's product as competitive as possible in every way—quality, price, and availability.

  • will provide Canadian Pacific with an opportunity to participate in the large and growing volume of trade between the United States and Western Europe to complement its Canada-Europe service now being operated by CP Ships. The other shareholders of Dart Containerline are Compagnie Maritime Beige

  • Two of Europe's important and w e l l - k n o w n repair yards have merged recently. Mercantile Marine Engineering and Graving Docks Company N.V., and Beliard Murdoch S.A., both of Antwerp, have consolidated into one company. Mercantile-Beliard will own and operate eight private drydocks f o r

  • Solus Ocean Systems have made the following executive appointments as the first part of a planned corporate reorganization to transfer the company's Europe and West Africa headquarters from Hounslow, Middlesex to Aberdeen, Scotland. Colin James has been appointed, manager, unmanned submersibles. Prior

  • pressures, long-term data sets are fundamental for monitoring these processes and understanding the complex and vast oceanic environment. In July 2016, the European Marine Board (EMB), a partnership of major national marine and oceanographic institutes in Europe, identified critical gaps within ocean observation

  • Dart, and Manchester Liners have agreed to coordinate on an equal basis the container services they now operate between Canada, the U.K. and Continental Europe. The new coordinated service will employ four cellular container vessels, each of about 1,500-TEU capacity and will use Montreal's Racine Terminal

  • di Navigazione. This comissioning is an important milestone for Izar-Manises Propusion and Energy, because it is the only licensee of Mitsubishi in Europe and because this engine is the first Mitsubishi engine delivered in Europe. The Commercial Manager of Mitsubishi in Europe, Hideo Kihara, the President

  • Organization (GTO), a San Francisco, Calif.- based transportation group, has announced the formation of a firm to operate ro/ro barge service between Europe and Saudi Arabia. The new firm has been named Euro-Arab Sea Trailer (EAST). Leo Collar, GTO's managing director, said that EAST would operate

  • Inc., a global ocean shipping research and information technology firm based in Jacksonville, Fla. Several ocean carriers in the transpacific and Asia/Europe routes made capacity cut-backs in the last three months of 2001. according to the January 2002 World Liner Supply report from ComPair Data, leading

  • Many of Europe’s marine species, habitats and ecosystems have been under threat for decades. As maritime economic activities are predicted to increase in coming years, a new briefing from the European Environment Agency (EEA) argues that the cumulative impact of human activity should be better managed to

  • Spanish shipbuilder and designer IZAR and Rolls-Royce have signed a contract for a new 696- ft. (212-m), 3,400 dwt European High Speed Cargo Vessel (EHSCV), which is intended to be a costeffective short-sea shipping alternative to road transport in Europe. The monohull EHSCV, which will be powered

  • him." Mr. Garrow graduated the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. in 1955. After gradu ation he served for 31 years as a public affairs specialist in Europe, the Far East and both coasts of the U.S. He was chief of information for NATO in Southern Europe, and ended his career in the Navy as its chief

  • MR Nov-19#84  safety in the form of the 
Europe’s leading commercial marine)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 84

    , in print, online, eNews and via social media. NABRICO NABRICO sought to deliver both innovation and new standard of winch safety in the form of the Europe’s leading commercial marine FASST Winder Winch. Rather than using a ratchet handle, the and workboat exhibition. new winch incorporates a handle

  • MR Nov-19#63  are far ahead, but  curve, Europe and globally.” But, while)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET for installation vessels. bon ? ber. There’s been a paradigm shift and ef? ciency, they are far ahead, but curve, Europe and globally.” But, while The prototype system was installed in in the largest players in the industry.” they’re a 120-year-old industry. Offshore

  • MR Nov-19#60  vessel. “Offshore wind outside Europe 
these are not the only)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    . It’s about weight and altitude.” But, number of turbines would need to be in- next generation turbines, with blade tips vessel. “Offshore wind outside Europe these are not the only issues, he says. stalled to create the same size farm. But, that might end up as high as 270 meters and China is starting

  • MR Nov-19#58  FLEET
Bigger, Bolder, Heavier
Europe’s offshore wind market)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    OFFSHORE WIND THE INSTALLATION FLEET Bigger, Bolder, Heavier Europe’s offshore wind market is growing faster than anyone expected, posing a challenge for the existing installation ? eet. By Elaine Maslin hile offshore wind is capacity. Last year, 2.4GW was added ing power into the grid in 2020/21, and

  • MR Nov-19#26  and storing CO² in all  Europe, in Europe alone, these)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    in the United States and investments in solar and wind energy energy interests, producing the oil and ing by capturing and storing CO² in all Europe, in Europe alone, these projects generation. The search of alternative en- gas which the world still needs, but with its operations. are responsible

  • MR Nov-19#14  drafting error is higher 
for Europeans looking to contract)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    (1) give rise to the problem before me or (2) could create a bigger problem for the client in the future. The risk of drafting error is higher for Europeans looking to contract with American companies. While all the par- ties to the transaction may speak the same language, the legal language (and precedent

  • MR Nov-19#6  that embraces the oppor- Europe, it has an amazing potential)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    a generation behind that of Kathleen Hickey k.hickey@marinelink.com holder of multiple maritime patents, a long-tenured executive that embraces the oppor- Europe, it has an amazing potential to Sales tunity to think outside the box. deliver both clean energy and a seri- Frank Covella covella@marinelink

  • MN Nov-19#69  owners mov-
ing over from Europe. 
  www.marinelink.com)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 69

    vessel availability – not to mention set operational stan- dards in the market and secure work with established project owners mov- ing over from Europe. www.marinelink.com MN Nov19 Layout 66-81.indd 69 MN Nov19 Layout 66-81.indd 69 10/28/2019 4:30:39 PM10/28/2019 4:30:39 P

  • MN Nov-19#54  builder for  a ton of work in Europe and it is a couple of)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 54

    it has entered into U.S it would be blowing people away right now. They have the domestic workboat market as the Jones Act builder for a ton of work in Europe and it is a couple of younger guys the Estonian, Baltic Workboats wave piercing pilot boat, that own it. It is pretty cool.” currently popular with

  • MP Q3-19#24  centers in Asia, Europe and South America. construction)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 24

    seek to beneft from a rush of ethane trade into key the pipeline, waiting for the projects that are underpinning their manufacturing centers in Asia, Europe and South America. construction to be approved. Most seek to transport U.S. eth- The strong demand for ethane has created an entirely new ship- ane

  • MP Q3-19#11  with projects in both Europe and North America. Since)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 11

    evaluation and fnancing of environmentally focused startup The ENVI-Marine is a new generation of scrubbing technology, companies with projects in both Europe and North America. Since 2010, based on a simple concept. The fue gases are frst quenched then he has also served as the founder and CEO of the Pacifc

  • MP Q3-19#4  safety  ects in both Europe and North America. Since)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    focused startup companies with proj- Logistics Professional 850 Montauk Hwy, #867 Bayport, leading numerous projects and performing safety ects in both Europe and North America. Since 2010, NY 11705. inspections and security audits on behalf of Flag Ad- he has also served as the founder and CEO of the Pa- The

  • MT Oct-19#53  3,Houston, TX 
Ofshore Energy Europe- Oct 7- 10, Amsterdam
Ad)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 53

    Tools & Manipulators Event Distribution Event Distribution Ofshore Northern Seas- Aug 31-Sep 1, Stavanger SNAME Sep 29- Oct 3,Houston, TX Ofshore Energy Europe- Oct 7- 10, Amsterdam Ad Close: Sep 21 Ad Close: Oct 22 OCTOBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER/DECEMBER Ad Close: Nov 21 Ocean Observation: Gliders, Buoys Acoustic

  • MT Oct-19#29  R&D 
every year. Now one of Europe’s largest research institutes)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 29

    “de- livers innovation”, it says, and 4,000 customers worldwide at- test to that by buying over $50 million worth of SINTEF R&D every year. Now one of Europe’s largest research institutes, some 2,000 international employees have pushed the 60-year- old institute to the forefront of purposeful commercial

  • MR Oct-19#62  to prepare the  its focus in Europe by strengthening its )
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    has enhanced cently received RO authorization from so that progress can be shared and, where oping zero carbon fuels to prepare the its focus in Europe by strengthening its Denmark and Cyprus. Our growth is possible, common positions taken. groundwork for the future. geographical footprint in the

  • MR Oct-19#45  with  ket has shifted to Europe in recent years, we are)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 45

    ing builders in the Carolinas. Though the yacht design mar- ship design and marine engineering industry. I qualify with ket has shifted to Europe in recent years, we are still pursu- “government” because 90% of the Navy’s ? ve-year SCN ing interests here and abroad. portfolio targets HII and

  • MR Oct-19#29  
2016)
of steel from Asia and Europe were in nascent  dimensions)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    take shape in the mid-1950s. Imports massive expansion project, and vessels with US importers will have a much wider choice 2016) of steel from Asia and Europe were in nascent dimensions of 1,200 x 161 ft. with a 49 ft. of options routing goods from the Far East. Courtesy of the Panama Canal Authority

  • MR Oct-19#6  on a whirlwind trip through Europe, covering 1500 miles in)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    +1 212 477 6700 building new. That is why this edition is centered on the future of marine design. Last month I Founder: was on a whirlwind trip through Europe, covering 1500 miles in 8 days, and I had the John J. O’Malley 1905 - 1980 opportunity to spend a few hours with our

  • MN Sep-19#48 , West Africa and North West Europe. This 
represents a sizeable)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 48

    OSV’s were laid up at the start of this year, with similar per- centages out of action in the US Gulf, Middle Chasing East, West Africa and North West Europe. This represents a sizeable portion of the global OSV ? eet sitting idle or in dry dock. Many of these vessels have been out of service for quite

  • MN Sep-19#39  such as 
What is known is that Europe has taken the lead in)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 39

    through a combination of new opera- proven slower than many forecasts. tional and technical measures. Lower-sulfur fuels such as What is known is that Europe has taken the lead in LNG will have a role to play, as will measures such as those developing bunkering infrastructure, supported by EU that optimize

  • MN Sep-19#22  the potential for  viders in Europe will be sign)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 22

    leases offshore Massachusetts. While competition from established supply chain pro- This record setting sale demonstrates the potential for viders in Europe will be sign

  • MN Oct-19#35   cessful short sea runs in Europe, the  in our intermodal)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    SHORTSEA SHIPPING service linking Stockton, California cessful short sea runs in Europe, the in our intermodal equation – deserve with the deepsea container docks at waterborne route from Norfolk into the same consideration as every other Oakland saw more than $10 million Baltimore is actually

  • MN Oct-19#18  operating domain  presence in Europe. 
even when navigating)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 18

    , collision avoidance the assets for testing and validation, and expanding our that detects and tracks all items within the operating domain presence in Europe. even when navigating through busy ? shing areas, the logis- In the

  • MN Mar-19#16 , Stephaich 
lived in Europe and New York City where)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    and four shipyards. Peter brings a unique perspective to the inland river business. Prior to arriving on the domestic waterfront, Stephaich lived in Europe and New York City where he worked for various fnancial institutions, including Lazard Frères, and Bankers Trust Company. At Bankers Trust, Mr. Stephaich