Adam Beck

  • Ferries for Alaska’s harsh conditions, built in Alaska by Alaskans. Vigor and Elliott Bay Design Group team up for a winning combination as the new Alaska Class Ferry Project takes shape.

    With its network of islands and fjords, rugged mountains and spectacular tidewater glaciers, Alaska’s Inside Passage may make a perfect summer cruise destination, but locals can’t choose when they travel. So when Alaskans need transport, the Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS) must find a way to move them. For the past eight years, the ferry system has been planning replacements for mainline boats that are over 50 years old. Now, for the first time, the state of Alaska has commissioned new ferries that will be built at home. They will be the largest ships ever built there. And, not a moment too soon.
    Vigor Alaska won the contract and identical twin ferries are being built in Ketchikan for $101 million. The keel equivalents were laid by December, 2014. Designed by Seattle-based Elliot Bay Design Group (EBDG), the two ferries will go into service along the Lynn Canal route between Juneau, Haines and Skagway. Lynn Canal is not a man-made canal but a fjord, which, at about 90 miles long, is one of the deepest and longest fjords in the world.

    Logistics and Performance: rolled into one
    Vigor will deliver the pair of 280-foot ferries in 2018 on a stretched-out schedule designed to keep costs down. The ferries will be built as Day Boats that operate on a 12-hour schedule. Without the need for crew quarters, the AMHS will reduce capitol and operational costs. Having two identical boats also helped offset design costs. At 280 feet, shorter in length than the ferries they will replace, the new Alaska Class boats will eventually take over from 350 to 400-foot ships. Each new ferry will have seats for 300 passengers, plus carry 53 vehicles. The beam will be 67 over guards, the draft 12 feet, six inches, with a 3,013 LT full load displacement. 
    Doug Miller, New Vessel Project Manager for AMHS, said that “Vessel One will have a schedule speed of 15.5 knots for the route between Juneau and Haines and a predicted sprint speed of 16.4 knots at 100% MCR (maximum continuous rating of the horsepower of the engines installed).” To achieve those goals, two EMD 12 cylinder engines at 3,000 horsepower will propel each vessel. Each ship will have two controllable pitch propeller systems made by Rolls Royce. Each ferry will have a bow opening door and bow loading ramp.

    Ferries: by Design
    When it came time to put pen to paper, AMHS chose the Elliot Bay Design Group, naval architects who frequently design ferries. And, why not? Over time, they have planned everything from a new, unnamed ferry for the Nantucket-Martha’s Vineyard-Woods Hole route, up to the giant Staten Island ferry, a 4,500-passenger behemoth. Beyond this, EBDG has also designed ferries for Washington State, North Carolina and Texas. EBDG has offices in Seattle and New Orleans and in 2013 opened a new office in Ketchikan. Together with Vigor’s growing Alaska footprint, the project has taken on a distinctly Alaskan feel.
    Weather can never be far from mind for naval architects, particularly when it comes to Alaskan weather. The Gulf of Alaska generates a fire hose of heavy rain and snowstorms that inundate southern Alaska. In the winter in Lynn Canal, daylight shortens to six hours. Winter winds blow at 40 miles per hour or above several times each month and temperatures can drop to minus five degrees Fahrenheit. Ferry captains find themselves battling freezing spray.
    “Lynn Canal is part of the Inside Passage but it’s a pretty large body of water and it’s pretty prone to weather conditions, as much of Alaska is,” said Vigor’s Adam Beck. “Some of the big challenges that they deal with are not only the heavy seas, but high winds and freezing spray, where the spray is coming off of the ship, coming off of the bow. It tends to freeze on contact.” Beck continues, “When they originally came out with the smaller ship concept, the cars were just on an open car deck. There was a lot of public concern that folks would come out to get in their cars and the cars would be blocks of ice. So the state went back and made a pretty significant change and enclosed the car decks.”
    When weather turns nasty, the ferry system must consider what it calls “Traveler Comfort.” As part of the design process, the ferry system and EBDG did wave-tank testing of the hull design in Denmark. Miller of AHMS said that the hull form was tested in Denmark at Force Technology. 
    “Force worked with Elliot Bay Design Group to perform numerically based optimization on the hull form.  A model of this optimized hull form was then created by Force and tested to confirm numerical based performance predictions, analyze the vessel’s sea keeping characteristics and predict maneuvering characteristics,” Miller said, adding, “The goal was to design the vessel capable of handling the forecasted vehicle and passenger loads in the future, and reduce the Motion Sickness Incidences that are found on the smaller vessels.”
    There are myriad variables to consider. “The overall vessel length impacts the motion of the vessel in waves, and the effect of those motions on the passengers, crew and vehicles. The weather data for the area was used and the Motion Sickness Incidences was forecasted to estimate what percentage of the passengers would feel ill over a two-hour period in the most exposed area. These tests were run on several models to determine the overall length and used as a comparison to other ships in our fleet,” Miller said.
    The design led to a 280 foot vessel. The flare above waterline, as well as the bulbous bow shape, were carefully developed to minimize slamming forces in heavy seas. The passenger spaces were arranged to provide more space in the midship area of the vessel for passengers to gather during rough seas. With these results, EBDG designed the ferries’ hull and bow shape to minimize spray generation and fore body slamming. Controllable pitch propellers will maximize maneuverability and efficiency.
    Though many ferry systems have begun to use catamarans for speed and stability, Miller said, “We have two aluminum catamarans in our fleet. They are fast, but in rough weather they have limitations due to pounding when the waves hit the wet deck between the two hulls.” For this reason and many others, and in the Lynn Canal, the ferry system has chosen a monohull.

    Home is Where the Money Is
    Recently retired Governor Sean Parnell redirected federal money away from ferries in order to allow the state build the new boats at home. Securing the contract was a coup for Vigor Alaska, but it didn’t come easy. “All along, the state was very clear,” said Vigor’s Beck, adding, “We had to give them a competitive price. I would characterize it as a challenging negotiation with the state of Alaska. By challenging, I mean: this was not an easy contract for us to win. We really had to sharpen our pencil over and over and over again to get there.”
    Among other things, Vigor stretched out the construction timeline. Longer lead times will allow Vigor to charge lower labor costs. While Vigor operates the shipyard, it is actually owned by Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, a public corporation created in 1967 by the Alaska Legislature. Vigor acquired the right to operate the shipyard in 2012. “The Vigor Alaska shipyard, the people of Alaska, and its elected officials shared the same goal of keeping tax payer dollars in the state and supporting family-wage jobs,” said Beck.
    Joe Corvelli, Vigor Industrial’s Sr. Vice President of Fabrication and Sales, said that Vigor’s experience building ferries for the state of Washington helped it procure the Alaska Class ferry contract. “In the Seattle yard, we’re now on our second class for building ferries for them. There’s a wonderful sort of momentum around building ferries. Again, now both in Alaska and in Seattle, and we’re seeing a national interest and we’re becoming known as ferry builders across the nation.”
    The Ketchikan yard has a 130,000 square foot ship production facility designed from the ground up to build ships upwards of 500 feet in length. It includes an adjacent five-story production center to minimize material flow and maximize efficiency.
    It rains 13 feet a year in Ketchikan. Beck said that the shipyard has been upgraded so “fortunately, much of the work is now indoors. We actually experience very few overall project delays due to weather. Again, by employing resident Alaskans who are accustomed to working in extreme conditions, we are able to perform high quality ship maintenance and repair work in Ketchikan, Seward, and remote locations across Alaska. Our people have developed a whole host of very unique production processes to overcome working in wet, windy, dark, and remote locations. I would like to tell you what they are, but those are Vigor’s competitive advantage for working in Alaska,” Beck said.
    The Ketchikan shipyard has already built to suit for the unique challenges of Southeast Alaska. Back when it was Alaska Ship and Drydock, the shipyard built the one-of-a-kind ice-capable M/V Susitna. The 194-foot Susitna was built for about $75 million as a prototype for possible use by the Navy. Beck emphasized that workers are multi-skilled and cross-trained so that they can work steadily all year. With the Alaska Class Ferry project, Vigor’s local workforce will expand from 160 to about 250. 

    Alaska’s Emerging Arctic Markets
    Beck said that Vigor is looking ahead to more work in the near future. “It’s the upcoming Arctic and what’s known as OCS, oil and gas exploration. We see both of those as a very emerging market, repairing the ships that will be operating in those areas. Particularly not just the Arctic in terms of the shipping lanes that’ll be used more and the upcoming Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as a new market.”
    The precise timing, Beck admits, remains to be seen. “They’ve got some final permitting to get in place, but it’s looking like things will start in the summer of 2015. There’s already vessels that have been in the waters there, some even in the Pacific Northwest that we have already begun working on.”
    Asked to name the projects, a Vigor representative would only say, “We have been working with several companies on RFP’s, but we cannot disclose details of those projects as we have signed non-disclosure agreements.” The expanding Northwest résumé of this growing, Pacific Coast-based builder will likely help build that already substantial portfolio and backlog even further. Not even the cold, icy weather of Alaska’s Arctic environment can stop that.



    (As published in the January 2015 edition of Marine News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeNews)
     

  • two years.  Congressman Don Young will be in Ketchikan on March 26, 2013 to dedicate the new ship production facilities at the Ketchikan Shipyard.  Adam Beck, President, Alaska Ship and Drydock, declared, “ASD is strategically positioned to serve a wide variety of customers … Specifically, our new assembly

  • .     1160 Brickyard Cove Road #B17,  Point Richmond, CA 94801 Phone: 4157179729 Email: karen@deepflight.com /www.deepflight.com CEO/President: Adam Wright Number of Employees: 8 Vice President: Robert Chamberlain Sales Manager: Robert Chamberlain Engineering Director: Adam Wright (As published

  • 3941 Park Drive Suite 20-218 El Dorado Hills, Calif., U.S. 95762 Tel: 530-677-1019 Email: adam@seafloorsystems.com Website: www.seafloorsystems.com CEO/President: John Tamplin Number of Employees: 7 Seafloor Systems, Inc. was formed in Portland, Oregon in 1999 by veteran Naval Hydrographer John

  • Road Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, U.K. NR31 0NB Tel: +44 1493 440355 E-mail: sales@appliedacoustics.com Website: www.appliedacoustics.com CEO/President: Adam Darling Employees: 45 (As published in the July/August 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com

  • for comfort and 360 degree viewing from acrylic domes; and uniquely capable of sub-sea flight, Super Falcon is the culmination of all our work,” said Adam Wright, President, Hawkes Ocean Technologies. (As published in the June 2013 edition of Marine Technologies - www.seadiscovery.com

  • Event Set For September 20-22, 1989 The National Waterway Conference's 1989 Annual Meeting will be held on September 20-22, 1989 at the Adam's Mark Hotel in St. Louis, Mo. Over the years, NWC annual meetings have gained wide recognition as timely, provocative programs featuring knowledgeable

  • SAFT Corporation of America, Valdosta, Ga., has announced the availability of a new line of highcapacity primary batteries for the navigational aid and barge lighting markets. According to Edgar Gardner, general manager, this is the first truly new development introduced to this market in many years.

  • 228 W 8th Street, Whitefish, MT, USA 59937 T: +1 406 250 6417 E: jay@hydrospheric.us http://www.slhydrospheric.com CEO/President: Jay Larsen Vice President: Kevin Beck SL Hydrospheric, LLC is made up of eight members, all hailing from the deep ocean search and survey industry.  In 2009 it formed the

  • From November 12-13, 2014 the McMillin Companies Event Center in sunny San Diego, Calif. played host to The Maritime Alliance’s 6th Annula Blue Tech & Blue Economy Summit, an event which has grown stronger year-on-year. This year’s two-day event, of which Marine Technology Reporter served as a media sponsor

  • 3941 Park Drive Suite 20-218 El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 T: +1 530 677 1019 E: adam@seafloorsystems.com W: www.seafloorsystems.com CEO/President: John Tamplin No. of Employees: 7 The Company Seafloor Systems, Inc. was formed in Portland, OR, in 1999 by veteran naval hydrographer John Tamplin to

  • sister ship to the Jademar and the Pearlmar, which were delivered in the first quarter and entered into previously announced 24-month time charters with Adam Maritime Corporation. Stelmar Shipping Ltd. — headquartered in Athens, Greece — announced, for the first quarter, a net income of $7.9 million,

  • MR Nov-19#29 WORKBOATS THE OSV MARKET
OSV 
Market 
Which way 
 
is)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    WORKBOATS THE OSV MARKET OSV Market Which way is Up? The environment in oil patches onshore and offshore alike has been challenging throughout 2019; worries about an eco- nomic slowdown – whether cyclical or in- duced by a trade war – have weighed heav- ily on oil prices, even in the face of reduced

  • MR Nov-19#2 NUMBER 11 / VOLUME 81 / NOVEMBER 2019
Features
Cover Image)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2

    NUMBER 11 / VOLUME 81 / NOVEMBER 2019 Features Cover Image Credit: Photos: ZF/Martin Meissner 28 Which Way is Up? Breakdown of the present and future of the OSV market. By Barry Parker 34 Data on the River Southern Towing breaks down the case for Z-Drive Towboats. By Greg Trauthwein 44 A Polar Presence Insi

  • MN Nov-19#85  Data 
Senior Project Engineer, Adam Kaplan, is the lead 
Scanner)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 85

    .com with that demand, Cool Breeze acquired a new propel- ler scanning device and the PropPress 360, a Digital Data Senior Project Engineer, Adam Kaplan, is the lead Scanner and a hydraulic propeller bending machine from developer of PropExpert and PropCad, HydroComp’s Linden Propellers, which

  • MN Nov-19#84  performance 
and save fuel. 
By Adam Kaplan
aving the right)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 84

    devices, assisting propeller manufacturers and repair shops to identify damage, repair and tune propellers to improve performance and save fuel. By Adam Kaplan aving the right tools for the job makes all the blade designs. PropCad allows designers to quickly setup difference. Propeller professionals

  • MN Nov-19#8   Senior Project Engineer, Adam Kaplan, 
from both the)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Network. the CDMCS Pipeline Taskforce Director. He possesses extensive knowledge and expertise working maritime operations Senior Project Engineer, Adam Kaplan, from both the public and private sectors, is the lead developer of PropExpert including serving with the U.S. Coast and PropCad, HydroComp’s

  • MT Jul-19#52  MEMS technology 
President/CEO: Adam Darling
of aluminum hulls)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    line of inertial sensors based on Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK versatile and a robust USV composed the state-of-the-art MEMS technology President/CEO: Adam Darling of aluminum hulls, weed cutting propel- such as Motion Reference Uni (MRU), No. of Employees: 44 lers and a modular payload pod system Inertial

  • MR May-19#62  Courtesy Alain Haig-Brown
Adam Schwetz of the Australian)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    FERRIES: FERRY SAFETY & SECURITY Photo Courtesy Alain Haig-Brown Adam Schwetz of the Australian ? rm Schwetz Design explains the ? ner points onboard the new Chao Phraya Tourist boat. comprehensive and detailed. ference a presentation by the IMO’s Irfan In a similar vein, Gianluca de Rosa, Rahim

  • MR Mar-19#36  Sven-Olof Lindblad 
Photo: Adam Cropp
eliminating plastics)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 36

    Photo: Sven-Olof Lindblad Photo: Sven-Olof Lindblad Photo: Stewart Cohen Photo: Sven-Olof Lindblad Photo: Adam Cropp eliminating plastics in our supply chains. The amounts navigator, curious and deeply concerned about the fu- of the world. Clearly, people will try to capitalize on of plastic in our

  • MR Nov-18#52  Guard photo by Petty Of? cer Adam Stanton)
cotics missions)
    November 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    ships currently • South: In the south it’s the drug enforcement, counter nar- calling on California ports. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Of? cer Adam Stanton) cotics missions. It’s humanitarian assistance and disaster response in the Caribbean basin, and paying a lot of attention to maritime migration

  • MN Nov-18#75 .com
Senior Project Engineer, Adam Kaplan, is the lead developer)
    November 2018 - Marine News page: 75

    propeller de- sign process, allowing for the rapid extraction of propeller design data from 3D geometries. www.hydrocompinc.com Senior Project Engineer, Adam Kaplan, is the lead developer of Pro- pExpert and PropCad, HydroComp’s propeller sizing and propeller design for tools. He has been with HydroComp

  • MN Nov-18#72  extraction from 3D CAD data.
By Adam Kaplan
arine propellers)
    November 2018 - Marine News page: 72

    VESSEL DESIGN Digital Feature Extraction with PropCad Premium 2018 A new utility automates feature extraction from 3D CAD data. By Adam Kaplan arine propellers can last a long time – it is not un- this task very dif

  • MR Oct-18#42 backbone of my maritime business  Every leader has goals.)
    October 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    backbone of my maritime business Every leader has goals. As for unmanned operations. However, network. I’ve also served as a volunteer incoming president of SNAME, commercial and smaller naval ships are at local, regional, and national levels for what are your top goals? getting closer to unmanned

  • MT Jul-18#56  / Xavier Orr CEO/President: Adam Darlin
g
Advanced Navigation)
    July 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    , Australia Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK www.advancednavigation.com.au/ www.appliedacoustics.com CEO/President: Chris Shaw / Xavier Orr CEO/President: Adam Darlin g Advanced Navigation is a privately Applied Acoustics was founded in Martin Charles owned Australian company that spe- 1989 to supply the

  • MR Aug-18#53  
and detailing,” said Mohamed Adam,  
May Ship’s founder and)
    August 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 53

    , we are diversifying ourselves to new markets such as industrial structural steel fabrication – full manufacturing and detailing,” said Mohamed Adam, May Ship’s founder and president. In addition, it is exploring the poten- tial of the “green” markets, such as wind HIGH DEFINITION RADAR SYSTEMS tower

  • MN Aug-18#72  leading  trols set up,” said Adam Mills, MJP’s UK based Regional)
    August 2018 - Marine News page: 72

    and ef? ciency. designed the X Series so operators can choose their con- Marine Jet Power’s product line consists of industry leading trols set up,” said Adam Mills, MJP’s UK based Regional waterjets ranging in size from 250 to 1550 pump diameter. Sales Manager. “By offering both HM and electronic con- MJP’s

  • MT Mar-18#77  Carey, University of Tasmania, Adam Soule, WHOI, ©Woods Hole)
    March 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 77

    the Studying the Largest Underwater Largest Underwater Volcanic EruptionVolcanic Eruption (Image credit: Rebecca Carey, University of Tasmania, Adam Soule, WHOI, ©Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) In July 2012, airline passengers ? ying search vessel Roger Revelle operated by High-resolution

  • MT Jan-18#16  of Philadelphia,  tion,” said Adam Soule, WHOI associ- sea)
    January 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 16

    the raft continued to gate a typical deep-sea explosive erup- ice, also created ash, lava domes and grow to roughly the size of Philadelphia, tion,” said Adam Soule, WHOI associ- sea? oor lava ? ows. Of the material that scientists observed that the eruption was ate scientist and chief scientist for the

  • MN Aug-17#84  937-6295
THE COMPANY:
E-mail: adam.jost@thrustmastertexas)
    August 2017 - Marine News page: 84

    .com Website: www.ssi-corporate.com CEO/President: Darren Larkins 6900 Thrustmaster Drive Houston, TX 77041 Tel: (713) 937-6295 THE COMPANY: E-mail: adam.jost@thrustmastertexas.com SSI develops Autodesk based solutions for the ship- Website: www.thrustmaster.net building and offshore industry including:

  • MR Dec-16#54  lling his duties will be  ceeds Adam M. Goldstein, President)
    December 2016 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    January 1, 2017. Donald suc- pany’s current customer base. He will the program’s inception in 1985. Chair- retire. Ful? lling his duties will be ceeds Adam M. Goldstein, President and develop and build effective market- man and CEO Tom Crowley Jr., grand- two executives. Dirk A. Lesko has COO of Royal

  • MN Dec-16#53  Maritime re-
cruitment veteran Adam Diaz to their 
expanding)
    December 2016 - Marine News page: 53

    in leading Oil & Gas and Maritime recruitment operations. Faststream also announced the arrival of U.S. Coast Guard and Maritime re- cruitment veteran Adam Diaz to their expanding Houston o

  • MR Nov-16#121  being used  The FCCA said that Adam Goldstein,  of the Type)
    November 2016 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 121

    Chairman at FCCA navian Micro Systems is stocking all over 240 ? eld engineers around the ratory is testing composites being used The FCCA said that Adam Goldstein, of the Type Approved NMEA splitters: world, will enable SpeedCast to provide in commercial aviation, aerospace and President and COO

  • MR Nov-16#120  Steel Chem Tankers ment expert Adam Diaz to its Houston 
Naval)
    November 2016 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 120

    Odffjell to Build Record Size U.S. Coast Guard and Maritime recruit- was elected a Fellow of the Society of Stainless Steel Chem Tankers ment expert Adam Diaz to its Houston Naval Architects and Marine Engineers Odfjell has ordered four chemical of? ce. Diaz has spent over 10 years (SNAME). Thomson

  • MR Nov-16#111  Lady Loren at Dickie 
Adam’s Lockport Fabrication)
    November 2016 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 111

    Car- has ? ushed-in container twist lock ? ttings for multiple container con? gurations. On request, riers, built the pusher-tug Lady Loren at Dickie Adam’s Lockport Fabrication in 2008. At the the vessel can also be “plug&play” ? tted with launch, he explained that the boat was the re- a four-point

  • MP Q4-16#45 itself on ? rm footing, with the majority of its assets on)
    Q4 2016 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 45

    itself on ? rm footing, with the majority of its assets on the An Offshore Business Model: water and earning money. There is, says Harvey Gulf Interna- for good times, and bad tional Marine President and CEO Shane Guidry, a formula for In the summer of 2013, Maritime Logistics Professional that reality