Florida

  • After Testing Records Technology Waters, Tug and Barge Company Jumps In.

    Shortly after Florida Marine Transporters CIO Don Carlton installed an electronic records management system for Kimberly Hidalgo, the tow service company’s head of Compliance, he suspected there might be other department heads interested in the new software. But, when Hidalgo’s department cut dozens of hours every week from staff time spent pulling paperwork from rooms full of filing cabinets while also automating complex administrative operations with the new system, Carlton knew all department heads would be interested.
    “So, we decided to go big with Laserfiche ECM,” Carlton said, referring to the new system. “I didn’t appreciate where this technology could ultimately take the company, but now that we see the way it is unfolding, we’re not thinking about where it can be deployed next, but when.”
    Twelve months ago, when Florida Marine purchased RIO – the most comprehensive system Laserfiche offers – it originally opened it to just 25 of its 1,000 employees. Today more than 200 employees are logging on in the company’s three largest departments: Compliance, Dry Cargo and Fluid Cargo. With another 75 employees expected to be up-and-running by the end of the year, Carlton is now pushing to have the system working companywide as fast as possible. 

    FMT Embraces ECM
    Florida Marine’s decision to move into electronic records technology was in part prompted by the sheer volume faced by Hidalgo’s Compliance Department. With Florida Marine’s 80 tugs and 200 barges pulling or pushing petroleum products through the country’s most challenging rivers and channels, Compliance responds to a flood of records requests from client auditors and government regulators. It was expected that converting those rooms full of paper records into electronic images would be an enormous time saver because those images could then be instantly accessed from anywhere from a centralized computer server.
    However, the system also came with added software features that Carlton was eyeing when originally negotiating the RIO contract with national Laserfiche reseller Complete Paperless Solutions. For example, the system’s Workflow module offered the company the capacity to automatically forward all those Compliance Department records to auditors and regulators upon request. No more pulling, copying, scanning, emailing or snail-mailing paper files for Compliance Department staff. “We had no idea that we could so reliably automate multi-step administrative functions,” Hidalgo said. “It gave us a whole new prospective on what this technology can do for Florida Marine.”
    That perspective can best be summed up as the difference between electronic records management, the technology Florida Marine was originally looking to adopt, and enterprise content management, the technology now being rolled out throughout the entire company. It’s the latter concept that Complete Paperless Solutions, (CPS) introduced to Florida Marine, Carlton says.
    Instead of just turning paper records into electronic images for increased ease of access, enterprise content management uses software to move those digitized documents throughout an organization, turning the manual passing of paperwork from person to person to the computerized flow of information from decision-maker to decision-maker. It not only allows for email alerts for those decision makers, it has security features that can be automated to accommodate changing access requirements, automated indexing for ease of filing when those electronic images are archived, and automated document destruction schedules at the end of the required lifespan of those archives.

    Beyond Compliance: logistics & operations
    As the new system successfully navigated the channels in Hidalgo’s Compliance Department, it was expanded next into the company’s Fluid Cargo Department. Florida Marine specializes in transporting oil and gas industry-related cargo, so nearly every moving part and flowing fluid on each of the barges and tugs it operates is monitored around-the-clock. As those tugs and barges pass through the most crowded shipping lanes in the country, their movements are also closely monitored. Inspection reports on all aspects of those operations are a daily routine that is now increasingly being automated at Florida Marine. “If you do inspections on boats now, they automatically get routed to the appropriate people without someone having to make the decision of who gets what,” Carlton says. “We’re no long relying on somebody physically routing these records, the system does all the routing and filing for us.”
    Taking advantage of other software modules in the new system, all the forms those inspections fill are now available on tablets carried by ship staff or port captains, eliminating another enormous source of paper from Florida Marine’s operations. This is opening the door to taking the nation’s third largest in-land tug and barge services company completely paperless, in what is one of the world most paper-laden industries, Carlton says. “We used to have cabinets and cabinets full of paper. We were killing trees by the thousands,” he says. “Now we have all the forms electronically, weather on computer or mobile device. They are all right there. No more printing them out and carrying them around.”
    That’s why Carlton wants the system installed companywide as soon as possible. Florida Marine’s training department and its vessel maintenance yards are being sized up for the system, as are accounts payable and personnel. Deck hands, tankermen, and captains are all expected to make use of the system. The speed of the roll out has been greater than either Carlton or Hidalgo expected, and training has been training required for officers and staff in each of the departments. Carlton credits Complete Paperless Solutions with its ability to get department heads comfortable enough with the new system to move their staff onto it and start building workflows of their own.
    CPS credits Florida Marine with understanding early the potential of the system and being aggressive in rolling it out once they felt comfortable using it. “It’s unusual to see a project move so fast, but they are pretty doggone good over at Florida Marine,” says CPS president Tom Ziencina. “Caution is important when making a move like this but when Florida Marine got the hang of it, they had the institutional knowledge to rapidly expand it throughout the company getting a much quicker return on their investment in the process.”
    Carlton says being willing to delegate and get staff directly involved in the process has been a big part of that. Weekly training sessions with CPS have enabled staff in Human Resources to build their own workflows involved in the new-hire on-boarding process. Hidalgo estimates Florida Marine has about 40 workflows in place now and there does not appear to be any facet of operations that can’t, in some way, be streamlined through the new system. Still, Carlton says, the company is taking it step-by-step.
    “We’re taking very fast steps,” he says. “There’s so much that we can do, now it’s just a matter of making sure that we get the maximum benefit available from the system from each department before we move onto the next department.” That includes the boats. Five of Florida Marine’s vessels have Laserfiche installed into on-board computers allowing them to share with land-based operations real-time information on the activities of each. However, the vessels still rely on cellular communications networks to transmit ship-board data and in some of the farther reaches of the Mississippi watershed, service can be spotty. That has Florida Marine considering prospects of one-day using ship-board satellite communications, but that may not be coming as quickly, as so many other aspects of Florida Marine’s operations are being lined up for conversion to the new system.

    Real Utility, Real Savings
    “We started out saving hundreds of staff hours every month and we might now be saving that every week,” Hidalgo says. “It’s been transformational for us, and while it’s been just a year, we’re starting to wonder how we ever got along under the old paper-based system.” The transformation has not escaped the attention of the family-owned business which has expanded almost as rapidly as the new Laserfiche system. Last year alone, Florida Marine commissioned four new tugs and one of those vessels, the M/V Kimberly Hidalgo, is scheduled to be christened in December. No doubt, when it is delivered, it will be that much more efficient, with the help the Laserfiche ECM system.


    (As published in the December 2014 edition of Marine News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeNews)

     

  • Joseph B. Shiffert, president of North Florida Shipyards at Commodores Point in Jacksonville, Fla., has announced recent appointments to expand and strengthen the yard's extensive services to ship operators. Albert A. White has joined North Florida Shipyards as production manager and assistant to

  • where the nation’s intermodal equation and the infrastructure to more efficiently move freight is coming together. And, not a moment too soon.North Florida Mega Port, almostAllison Magrath is the Senior Land Planner at Kimley-Horn in Gainesville, Florida.  She was Industrial Development Manager -

  • Coastal Tug & Barge, Inc., Miami, Fla., recently announced the completion of its newest tug, the Coastal Florida. The innovative design of this motor vessel incorporates the latest advances in marine engineering into Coastal's towing services. The 90-foot-long, 4,000-horsepower class vessel is

  • Government and industry will join forces on October 1 to create an oil spill on the waters of Florida's Cypress Gardens tourist attraction. That's the "bad" news. The good news is that they will clean it right up. This dramatic exercise in coping with hazardous spills is to be part of the 7 th Annual

  • every two days and from Miami every five days, with transit times to San Juan of less than four days. Northbound sailings from San Juan to Florida are available every second day. A fifth sister barge will be integrated into TMT's Florida/Puerto Rico operations in March. "By introducing these

  • treatment other than near-freezing cold treatment at sea in containers for at least 14 days to prevent fruit flies from maturing. That’s because both the Florida Commissioner of Agriculture and the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) take fruit fly interdiction

  • for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division and Marcos Daniel Jimenez, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, announced that three senior cruise ship engineers were indicted by a federal grand jury in Miami, Fla., for their role in concealing the overboard dum

  • . Turning to corporate finance, Mr. Moran was appointed assistant vice president of finance in 1973. With Moran's acquisition of the Florida Towing Company in 1976, he was named vice president and general manager of the Jacksonville, Fla., firm. In 1981, Governor Bob Graham of Florida

  • The Southeast Section of The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers inducted the newly formed Student Section from the Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Fla., into SNAME at a recent section meeting. This is the second official student section to be established in the Southeast

  • Marine Lines in 1971 to work in the sales department at the New York office. A graduate of Georgetown University, he was appointed vice president of Florida Towing Company in Jacksonville when that firm was acquired by Moran in 1976. He returned to New York in 1983 to become manager of Moran's Barge

  • also held positions in operations, special projects, labor relations and subsidiary management. In 1980, he was appointed assistant vice president of Florida Towing Co., and in 1982 he became vice president and general manager. Moran's Jacksonville operating company has since been renamed Moran Towing

  • MR Mar-19#6  Doulis Lind-
Lisa Overing - Florida
Claudio Paschoa - Brazil
parts)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    Mulligan - UK Cruise shipping has always been an interesting sector of the maritime market, equal heroes, and according to Doulis Lind- Lisa Overing - Florida Claudio Paschoa - Brazil parts hotel accommodation/entertainment and maritime technological evolution. blad is “one of the most well-travelled Peter

  • MT Mar-19#71  include  Group Systems Inc in Florida, has three  the quartz)
    March 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 71

    has expanded their based Hydro Group Asia Pte and Hydro early growth of bio fouling inside manufacturing capabilities to include Group Systems Inc in Florida, has three the quartz cell. The OS333 CTD can end-to-end systems for a variety of decades of experience and business guarantee sampling rates

  • MT Mar-19#61  may be drones. 
monitoring in Florida  . As with any data,)
    March 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 61

    what data are needed and how they should be • Drones for harmful algal bloom (HAB) detection and collected, which may be drones. monitoring in Florida . As with any data, drone data need to be translated • Drones as a tool for surveying tidal marshes at three into information, which can then be

  • MT Mar-19#4 , as is her custom, goes 
FLORIDA
215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    March 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    is packed with insights on future applications. Tel: (212) 477-6700; Fax: (212) 254-6271 Contributing writer Elaine Maslin, as is her custom, goes FLORIDA 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 broad and deep on the subject of decommissioning. Buttoning up Tel: (561) 732-4368; Fax: (561) 732-6984 and

  • MT Jan-19#4  in Aberdeen for Subsea 
FLORIDA
215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    January 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    in the offshore energy markets, which Tel: (212) 477-6700; Fax: (212) 254-6271 includes offshore wind. We were recently in Aberdeen for Subsea FLORIDA 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 Expo and in New Orleans for Underwater Intervention, and there Tel: (561) 732-4368; Fax: (561) 732-6984 is

  • MN Mar-19#41 . And 
that nice inspector in Florida is going to 
be in Dutch)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 41

    is that the Coast Guard is not your friend; not your sworn enemy either, but an en- forcement agency with a job to do. And that nice inspector in Florida is going to be in Dutch Harbor next summer and who will his replacement be? Another nice guy? Every mariner with a few is- sues under his belt

  • MN Mar-19#35  bureaucrats and 
high-powered Florida law frms representing)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    of Miami River Marine Group. Bohnsack and Payne attended many Miami city commission meetings together. They fought bureaucrats and high-powered Florida law frms representing pow- erful real estate magnets whose agenda was rezon- ing working waterfront from commercial to resi- dential for skyscraper

  • MN Mar-19#34  New York, South Carolina and Florida. The 
101 for the ladies)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 34

    intends to add another towboat to its feet of four M process actually provided a benefcial crash course in tug stationed in New York, South Carolina and Florida. The 101 for the ladies. ladies and Tomlinson have ambitious plans to obtain fed- “When I saw that boat taken out of the water and all the eral

  • MN Mar-19#4  (USPS#013-952)
Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    MarineNews MarineNews March 2019 Volume 30 Number 3 (ISSN#1087-3864) (USPS#013-952) Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 tel: (561) 732-4368; fax: (561) 732-6984 Departments Analysis New York: 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 & tel: (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.

  • MP Q1-19#64 ....................54, 55, 56 Florida Gateway ............)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 64

    Savannah ............................................................18 AAPA .................................................................54, 55, 56 Florida Gateway .......................................................19, 20 Port Tampa Bay ............................................................

  • MP Q1-19#52  MPS-ISAO for the state of Florida. 
With AVERT C2, frst)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 52

    those human had similar capabilities and is currently pulling in cyber infor- resources more effectively. mational alerts from MPS-ISAO for the state of Florida. With AVERT C2, frst responders have access to advanced beFoRe The ReSPonSe: ASSeSSIng The RISk technology and next generation solutions. AVERT

  • MP Q1-19#51  scenario. The event 
for Florida to unite seaports within)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 51

    of testing leading edge technolo- gies in live HAZMAT, rescue, recovery, and security events. The situation was based on a HAZMAT scenario. The event for Florida to unite seaports within the state with state and lo- cal government agencies. An ARES spokesperson explained, started with a Mayday and corresponding

  • MP Q1-19#45  Po-
was Editor of Florida Shipper Magazine. Additionally)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 45

    swift and adaptive is an award winning journalist and editor. Formerly, he polar exploration, Hondius is the world’s frst-registered Po- was Editor of Florida Shipper Magazine. Additionally, he lar Class 6 ship and one of the most advanced vessels on the was Executive Director of the Miami River Marine

  • MP Q1-19#42  travel through the South Florida port ev-
The Miami-Dade)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 42

    of light fashing against the sky With 22 cruise lines berthing 55 ships at PortMiami, mil- and Biscayne Bay. lions of passengers travel through the South Florida port ev- The Miami-Dade County Commission also approved a ery year with an emphasis on cruises to the Bahamas, the 42 Maritime Logistics Professional

  • MP Q1-19#26  
a Professor of Marketing at Florida International University)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 26

    trends, and has seen tremendous growth. Lin Humphrey, Ph.D. important for most of today’s global wanderlust travelers and a Professor of Marketing at Florida International University some make decisions based on a company’s initiatives as to (FIU) whose career has included a stint at Carnival Corp, told

  • MP Q1-19#23 , they’ll need to 
sonville, Florida; Eastwood Commerce Center)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 23

    liners are all beginning Grange, Georgia; Cecil Commerce Center Mega Site in Jack- to come on board. When they do, of course, they’ll need to sonville, Florida; Eastwood Commerce Center, in Lemoyne, frst “take the train.” A photo of the Love’s truck stop, the only current tenant at America’s Gateway Industrial

  • MP Q1-19#22  various types  ville, Florida; the 1,551-acre Glendale)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 22

    , which addresses increas- Commerce Center Mega Site in CSX's hometown of Jackson- ing demand for customer sites by developing various types ville, Florida; the 1,551-acre Glendale Mega Site in Kentucky; The Weyerhauser Mega Port site in North Florida showing the planned improvements. CREDIT: Weyerhauser

  • MP Q1-19#21  
Kimley-Horn in Gainesville, Florida
CREDIT: BNSF Logistic)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 21

    challenge. Now all of those pieces are falling into place and it just takes time. – Allison Magrath, Senior Land Planner at Kimley-Horn in Gainesville, Florida CREDIT: BNSF Logistic Park the Port of Savannah’s Garden City Terminal. GPA said ARP frst year of operation. is expected to remove 50,000 trucks

  • MP Q1-19#20  in 
economic development in Florida. Private 
“
property)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 20

    has been a pioneering public-private partnership between local, state and private property owners ending a stalemate in economic development in Florida. Private “ property owners and developers are reluctant to invest millions of dollars in infrastructure on a greenfeld site in advance of proven

  • MP Q1-19#19  CSX intermodal terminal with Florida’s 
Gateway park in the)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 19

    The CSX intermodal terminal with Florida’s Gateway park in the background. nects to CSX in Sebring, Florida. She says that the rail line belongs to U.S. Sugar Company while Americas Gateway is developed in a large part by a rival regional landowner, the Duda Brothers. But she says that as soon as

  • MP Q1-19#18 , not a moment too soon.
NORTh FLORIdA MEgA PORT, ALMOST
Allison)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 18

    where the nation’s intermodal equation and the infrastructure to more effciently move freight is com- ing together. And, not a moment too soon. NORTh FLORIdA MEgA PORT, ALMOST Allison Magrath is the Senior Land Planner at Kimley-Horn in Gainesville, Florida. She was Industrial Development Man- ager - Real

  • MP Q1-19#14  are doing this with  one in Florida). What’s the criteria)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 14

    INSIGHTS what optimal expansion plans look like. We are doing this with one in Florida). What’s the criteria for that? In other feedback from our tenants and customers, with support from words, why JAXPORT? a robust business model that can drive growth and prosperity. This is a combination of the

  • MP Q1-19#12  state and here in 
Northeast Florida. That there is room to)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 12

    INSIGHTS ed by the scale of population growth, in the region, in the state and here in Northeast Florida. That there is room to grow here with 6 million square feet of spec warehousing space projected for the next 5 years. That all of the pieces of the effciency puzzle are already in place – superior

  • MP Q1-19#4 .com
former editor of Florida Shipper Magazine  pean)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    Gregory R. Trauthwein award-winning journalist and editor. He is a Group and to UK Government and Euro- trauthwein@marinelink.com former editor of Florida Shipper Magazine pean committees on maritime strategy, in- and has served as an adjunct professor of novation and regulation. Currently, Stelios