Florida

  • After Testing Records Technology Waters, Tug and Barge Company Jumps In.

    Shortly after Florida Marine Transporters CIO Don Carlton installed an electronic records management system for Kimberly Hidalgo, the tow service company’s head of Compliance, he suspected there might be other department heads interested in the new software. But, when Hidalgo’s department cut dozens of hours every week from staff time spent pulling paperwork from rooms full of filing cabinets while also automating complex administrative operations with the new system, Carlton knew all department heads would be interested.
    “So, we decided to go big with Laserfiche ECM,” Carlton said, referring to the new system. “I didn’t appreciate where this technology could ultimately take the company, but now that we see the way it is unfolding, we’re not thinking about where it can be deployed next, but when.”
    Twelve months ago, when Florida Marine purchased RIO – the most comprehensive system Laserfiche offers – it originally opened it to just 25 of its 1,000 employees. Today more than 200 employees are logging on in the company’s three largest departments: Compliance, Dry Cargo and Fluid Cargo. With another 75 employees expected to be up-and-running by the end of the year, Carlton is now pushing to have the system working companywide as fast as possible. 

    FMT Embraces ECM
    Florida Marine’s decision to move into electronic records technology was in part prompted by the sheer volume faced by Hidalgo’s Compliance Department. With Florida Marine’s 80 tugs and 200 barges pulling or pushing petroleum products through the country’s most challenging rivers and channels, Compliance responds to a flood of records requests from client auditors and government regulators. It was expected that converting those rooms full of paper records into electronic images would be an enormous time saver because those images could then be instantly accessed from anywhere from a centralized computer server.
    However, the system also came with added software features that Carlton was eyeing when originally negotiating the RIO contract with national Laserfiche reseller Complete Paperless Solutions. For example, the system’s Workflow module offered the company the capacity to automatically forward all those Compliance Department records to auditors and regulators upon request. No more pulling, copying, scanning, emailing or snail-mailing paper files for Compliance Department staff. “We had no idea that we could so reliably automate multi-step administrative functions,” Hidalgo said. “It gave us a whole new prospective on what this technology can do for Florida Marine.”
    That perspective can best be summed up as the difference between electronic records management, the technology Florida Marine was originally looking to adopt, and enterprise content management, the technology now being rolled out throughout the entire company. It’s the latter concept that Complete Paperless Solutions, (CPS) introduced to Florida Marine, Carlton says.
    Instead of just turning paper records into electronic images for increased ease of access, enterprise content management uses software to move those digitized documents throughout an organization, turning the manual passing of paperwork from person to person to the computerized flow of information from decision-maker to decision-maker. It not only allows for email alerts for those decision makers, it has security features that can be automated to accommodate changing access requirements, automated indexing for ease of filing when those electronic images are archived, and automated document destruction schedules at the end of the required lifespan of those archives.

    Beyond Compliance: logistics & operations
    As the new system successfully navigated the channels in Hidalgo’s Compliance Department, it was expanded next into the company’s Fluid Cargo Department. Florida Marine specializes in transporting oil and gas industry-related cargo, so nearly every moving part and flowing fluid on each of the barges and tugs it operates is monitored around-the-clock. As those tugs and barges pass through the most crowded shipping lanes in the country, their movements are also closely monitored. Inspection reports on all aspects of those operations are a daily routine that is now increasingly being automated at Florida Marine. “If you do inspections on boats now, they automatically get routed to the appropriate people without someone having to make the decision of who gets what,” Carlton says. “We’re no long relying on somebody physically routing these records, the system does all the routing and filing for us.”
    Taking advantage of other software modules in the new system, all the forms those inspections fill are now available on tablets carried by ship staff or port captains, eliminating another enormous source of paper from Florida Marine’s operations. This is opening the door to taking the nation’s third largest in-land tug and barge services company completely paperless, in what is one of the world most paper-laden industries, Carlton says. “We used to have cabinets and cabinets full of paper. We were killing trees by the thousands,” he says. “Now we have all the forms electronically, weather on computer or mobile device. They are all right there. No more printing them out and carrying them around.”
    That’s why Carlton wants the system installed companywide as soon as possible. Florida Marine’s training department and its vessel maintenance yards are being sized up for the system, as are accounts payable and personnel. Deck hands, tankermen, and captains are all expected to make use of the system. The speed of the roll out has been greater than either Carlton or Hidalgo expected, and training has been training required for officers and staff in each of the departments. Carlton credits Complete Paperless Solutions with its ability to get department heads comfortable enough with the new system to move their staff onto it and start building workflows of their own.
    CPS credits Florida Marine with understanding early the potential of the system and being aggressive in rolling it out once they felt comfortable using it. “It’s unusual to see a project move so fast, but they are pretty doggone good over at Florida Marine,” says CPS president Tom Ziencina. “Caution is important when making a move like this but when Florida Marine got the hang of it, they had the institutional knowledge to rapidly expand it throughout the company getting a much quicker return on their investment in the process.”
    Carlton says being willing to delegate and get staff directly involved in the process has been a big part of that. Weekly training sessions with CPS have enabled staff in Human Resources to build their own workflows involved in the new-hire on-boarding process. Hidalgo estimates Florida Marine has about 40 workflows in place now and there does not appear to be any facet of operations that can’t, in some way, be streamlined through the new system. Still, Carlton says, the company is taking it step-by-step.
    “We’re taking very fast steps,” he says. “There’s so much that we can do, now it’s just a matter of making sure that we get the maximum benefit available from the system from each department before we move onto the next department.” That includes the boats. Five of Florida Marine’s vessels have Laserfiche installed into on-board computers allowing them to share with land-based operations real-time information on the activities of each. However, the vessels still rely on cellular communications networks to transmit ship-board data and in some of the farther reaches of the Mississippi watershed, service can be spotty. That has Florida Marine considering prospects of one-day using ship-board satellite communications, but that may not be coming as quickly, as so many other aspects of Florida Marine’s operations are being lined up for conversion to the new system.

    Real Utility, Real Savings
    “We started out saving hundreds of staff hours every month and we might now be saving that every week,” Hidalgo says. “It’s been transformational for us, and while it’s been just a year, we’re starting to wonder how we ever got along under the old paper-based system.” The transformation has not escaped the attention of the family-owned business which has expanded almost as rapidly as the new Laserfiche system. Last year alone, Florida Marine commissioned four new tugs and one of those vessels, the M/V Kimberly Hidalgo, is scheduled to be christened in December. No doubt, when it is delivered, it will be that much more efficient, with the help the Laserfiche ECM system.


    (As published in the December 2014 edition of Marine News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeNews)

     

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    February 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 71

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  • MN Feb-18#48  the  place in Panama City, Florida, and employed more than)
    February 2018 - Marine News page: 48

    in the GLDD (and U.S. ELLIS ISLAND and tug DOUGLAS B. MACKIE took ? ag dredging) ? eet, Ellis Island signi? cantly increases the place in Panama City, Florida, and employed more than United States commercial Jones Act hopper ? eet capacity 400 shipyard workers over the three-year construction as the

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Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    February 2018 - Marine News page: 4

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  • MT Jan-18#4  trauthwein@marinelink.com
FLORIDA
215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    January 2018 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    NEW YORK 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 Associate Publisher & Editor Tel: (212) 477-6700; Fax: (212) 254-6271 Email: trauthwein@marinelink.com FLORIDA 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 Tel: (561) 732-4368; Fax: (561) 732-6984 t is my true pleasure to welcome the readers of Marine Technology

  • MR Jan-18#61  for the 
Neptune Beach, Florida 32266
(904) 221-7447)
    January 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    Liaison ?/Y?ÐGÐOŽY?AYE^??|G?? 2300 Marsh Point Road #303 GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC.GILBERT ASSOCIATES, INC. Human Resources for the Neptune Beach, Florida 32266 (904) 221-7447 s www.laypitman.com Naval Architects Marine Industry and Marine Engineers Knowledgeable and experienced Human Resource professionals

  • MR Jan-18#54  of 
retail locations in Florida.
MacGregor Acquires Rapp)
    January 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 54

    use its new cation buildings in Salisbury, Md., with by Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding. The ATB to supply its growing network of retail locations in Florida. MacGregor Acquires Rapp Marine MacGregor, part of Cargotec, has signed PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS an agreement to acquire Rapp Marine Group (RMG) in

  • MR Jan-18#39  repair yard in Jacksonville, Florida is well-positioned to)
    January 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 39

    : David M. T omas Jr. From government to commercial to megayacht owners and everything in between – the BAE Systems ship repair yard in Jacksonville, Florida is well-positioned to prosper. David BAE Systems Jacksonville M. Thomas, Jr.’s , who at the time of our interview was Vice President & General Manager

  • MN Jan-18#55  in the states of Virginia, Florida, 
and New York, and is)
    January 2018 - Marine News page: 55

    of Newcastle Upon Tyne. He was promoted to DLBA Technical Director in 2011. Bowles is a licensed Professional Engi- neer in the states of Virginia, Florida, and New York, and is a certi? ed Proj- ect Management Professional. SMART Center Adds Princi- pal Investigator, Director The National Science

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Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    January 2018 - Marine News page: 4

    MarineNews MarineNews January 2018 Volume 29 Number 1 (ISSN#1087-3864) (USPS#013-952) Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 tel: (561) 732-4368; fax: (561) 732-6984 Departments Analysis New York: 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 & tel: (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.

  • MP Q4-17#47 . The company 
The Northeast Florida hub of the U.S. to Puerto)
    Nov/Dec 2017 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 47

    , including analytics and communications, to the East Coast of the United States.” businesses across the maritime spectrum. The company The Northeast Florida hub of the U.S. to Puerto Rico trades can be found online at www.conconnect.com is also emerging as the fulcrum for the LNG bunkering busi- www.maritimelo

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    Nov/Dec 2017 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 46

    Scandinavia and Northern Europe and some Asian ports. faction facility and then move to where the customers are. In the United States, Jacksonville, Florida seems to be at the Seacor Holdings, for example, has acknowledged that LNG epicenter of the LNG-fueling map, but Harvey Gulf’s foray bunkering

  • MP Q4-17#44 , to fueling stations around 
Florida and the Caribbean.
Separately)
    Nov/Dec 2017 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 44

    LNG transporters (Q-LNG) which will be building an Articulated Tug Barge (ATB) to transport LNG for charterer Shell Trading, to fueling stations around Florida and the Caribbean. Separately, Tote Maritime, already an owner of two newly built LNG fueled container vessels, announced that two exist- ing Ro-Ro

  • MR Dec-17#58  Terrace Place Riviera Beach, Florida 
SERVICES   toby@inmarsolution)
    December 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    Gonzales, FILTRATION PROPULSION EQUIPMENT AND LA 70737 USA , tel:(225) 644-7063 ext 15, (MAFS) Harmsco, 7169 49th Terrace Place Riviera Beach, Florida SERVICES toby@inmarsolutions.com contact: Toby Whitfield, Viega, Mountain View Corporate Center Building 1, 33407 www.inmarsolutions.com (Twiflex)

  • MT Nov-17#4  trauthwein@marinelink.com
FLORIDA
215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    November 2017 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    NEW YORK 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 Associate Publisher & Editor Tel: (212) 477-6700; Fax: (212) 254-6271 Email: trauthwein@marinelink.com FLORIDA 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435 Tel: (561) 732-4368; Fax: (561) 732-6984 he end of the year is the traditional period to review and project

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    December 2017 - Marine News page: 46

    Company & Great May 23, 2017. The 78’ coastal class research vessel is the Lakes Shipyard entered into a partnership with Damen, newest addition to the Florida Institute of Oceanography who provided engineering for its proven designs and Great (FIO) ? eet and will help continue the efforts of scienti?

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    December 2017 - Marine News page: 42

    as much as 15 memory wreaked considerable havoc in this hemisphere. percent since its mid-2016 low. Beyond this, global energy Puerto Rico, Texas and Florida all took substantial hits and markets have been shored up by bullish hedge funds that if anyone previously doubted the value of being able to call

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Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton)
    December 2017 - Marine News page: 4

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carol.gorenflo@baesystems)
    November 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 122

    , tel:(607) 770-2083, www.ChesapeakeMarineInst.com toby@inmarsolutions.com contact: Toby Whitfield, Harmsco, 7169 49th Terrace Place Riviera Beach, Florida carol.gorenflo@baesystems.com El Camino College, 13430 Hawthorne Blvd., Hawthorne, www.inmarsolutions.com 33407 CA , USA , tel:(310) 973-3147

  • MR Nov-17#96  to improving quality,  Miami, Florida 
productivity and ef)
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    20 Leading Marine Distributors approaches in solution development and Ships Machinery Intl. we are dedicated to improving quality, Miami, Florida productivity and ef? ciency. Our vendors e: info@shipsmachinery.com include Bosch Rexroth, Aventics (WAB- www.shipsmachinery.com CO), Hydac, Kluber, Graco

  • MR Nov-17#67 , 
93 nm east of Miami, Florida, strategically located)
    November 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 67

    be ready to go. more interest once it is in service.” MECHANICAL GBSL is located in Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, 93 nm east of Miami, Florida, strategically located on major shipping routes from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East to the Americas. For detailed information about services

  • MR Nov-17#52  its newest tanker, 
1912
Florida. The 330,000-barrel vessel)
    November 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    . dent and CEO following the passing of his father. Cove in Ketchikan, Alaska, and Prince Rupert, In January, Crowley christened its newest tanker, 1912 Florida. The 330,000-barrel vessel was immedi- British Columbia. To manage the growing ? eet, Crowley built a ma- 2001 ately put to work in the U.S. Gulf

  • MR Nov-17#44 , AME
oices
AME is a Florida based engineering services)
    November 2017 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    Rich Merhige, President/Owner, AME oices AME is a Florida based engineering services company specializing in marine (Advanced Mechanical Enterprises) and industrial (Advanced Maintenance Engineering) pre- dictive, preventative and corrective maintenance for rotat- ing and reciprocating machinery. Founded

  • MN Nov-17#72  enough for the 
Edgewater,Florida-based BCGP. That’s because)
    November 2017 - Marine News page: 72

    the marketplace. At the same, it is also true that all the manufacturing capabil- ity and innovation in the world simply isn’t enough for the Edgewater,Florida-based BCGP. That’s because, along with 60 years of continuous quality operations, the ? rm recently also marked a major safety milestone. Boasting

  • MN Nov-17#71  expansion at the com-
pany’s Florida Headquarters in early)
    November 2017 - Marine News page: 71

    hen Brunswick Commer- cial & Government Prod- ucts (BCGP) broke ground W on a facility expansion at the com- pany’s Florida Headquarters in early May, it served notice that this well- known boatbuilder had ramped up both its delivery capabilities, and an expanded array of new hulls. With a new large-boat