Fuel Cell

  • A maritime consortium, including ABS and Sandia National Laboratories, recently proved the viability of a hydrogen fuel cell ferry designed for operations in the environmentally sensitive San Francisco Bay area.  

    The IMO’s mandate to cap the sulfur content in marine fuel at the start of next year may be the biggest regulatory change in shipping since the requirement for double hulls, but the challenge will fade in comparison to its future goals to reduce green-house gases (GHG).

    A year ago (April 2018), the IMO agreed to a preliminary strategy that targeted a minimum 40% reduction in CO2 emissions on a cargo-tonne mile basis by 2030, and a 50% reduction in GHG emissions from shipping by 2050. To support and inform that goal, the mandatory collection of emissions data from ships started in January. The IMO’s final strategy will be unveiled in 2023. In the interim, it is committed to release its fourth GHG study, and to analyze and report the findings from three years of having collected data on the industry’s emissions.

    The mandatory global targets to reduce the emissions from shipping are the most ambitious yet: they will require measures that combine improvements in ship design; the creation of new fuels and alternative forms of propulsion; operational changes; and the application of digital technology. Because those goals are unlikely to be met without the development of new technology, industry and governments will need to expand the resources they make available for research and development.

    A technology with potential
    One area of promise for energy generation onboard ships is fuel cells. Fuel cells are presently used in a variety of land applications, such as to provide power in remote areas, as well as for industrial, residential and commercial buildings. Energy from hydrogen fuel cells, in particular, is already used in land-based transport vehicles, such as municipal buses, trains and heavy-duty trucks, as well as for industrial equipment such as forklifts.

    While submarines have been built recently with hybrid propulsion units using hydrogen fuels cells, its use in the commercial shipping sector largely has been limited to auxiliary purposes: fuel cells can provide shipboard heat and power – including ‘hotel’ power, such as that required on cruise ships – and ‘cold ironing’, providing an alternative shoreside power source that allows ships to shut down their engines while at dock, lessening their emissions output.  

    Additionally, there has been a lot of research and prototyping in the maritime sector to investigate applications on small passenger ferries and other short-sea vessels. ABS, in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, recently confirmed the feasibility of high-speed, hydrogen-fueled ferries for use in the San Francisco Bay area. Separately, Norway late last year provided the funding for construction of a hydrogen-powered high-speed ferry and a short-sea freighter.

    Potential, and Challenges
    Hydrogen fuel cells technology has the potential to offer reliable, long-range power on an industrial scale, with relatively quick refueling when compared to the emerging battery-powered options. Hydrogen itself has higher energy density than batteries, potentially making fuel-cell systems more practical for operators looking to replace or supplement traditional bunker-fuelled propulsion units.

    However, sourcing of hydrogen can be energy intensive. Without the incorporation of renewably generated hydrogen, the net impact on GHG gas for hydrogen produced by methane or similar processes is negligible. Also, adopting hydrogen as a deepsea marine fuel is not without challenges, even before safety factors are considered.

    It is important to compare the energy density of different energy sources – including fuel cells – to better understand how they need to mature before they will be suitable for global shipping, where the carriage of cargo is the main focus. In general, fuel cell systems require less maintenance (potentially offering lower maintenance costs) and long service lives. They also generate less noise than present heavy oil power plants, contributing to a more comfortable work environment for the crew and less disruption for  the surrounding marine life.

    The suitability of fuel cell systems for hybrid propulsion solutions – coupled with diesel – has an extensive track record. But perhaps most importantly for proactive owners looking for a path to IMO emissions compliance in 2030 and 2050, hydrogen fuel cell systems would generate zero GHGs; their only by-product from energy generation is water. Another key challenge will be for the marine industry to develop a hydrogen-distribution system that is capable of producing and distributing the significant quantities required for a global network of large ships.

    The refineries are adjusting their production processes to accommodate increases in demand as alternate fuels gain popularity, but the supply networks will need to mature before the marine industry will feel confident enough to widely adopt power systems that utilize fuel cells. As a power generation technology, fuel cells are comparatively mature. Shipowners may want to look at the technology as something more than a ‘future fuel’ and instead recognize its present benefits to the marine industry as they act to reduce the carbon footprints of their fleets and steer towards a more sustainable future.

    How fuel cell systems work
    A fuel cell is a device that converts the chemical energy from a fuel into electricity via an electrochemical reaction of the fuel with oxygen, or other oxidizing agents. They differ from batteries in that fuel cells require a continuous source of fuel and oxygen (usually from the air) to sustain the chemical reaction, whereas the availability of energy from a battery is fixed by the amount of energy it has stored. Fuel cells can produce electricity continuously as long as fuel and oxygen are supplied to them.

    There are many types of designs for fuel cells. Most consist of an anode, cathode and an electrolyte that allows positively charged hydrogen ions (known as protons) to move from the anode to the cathode side of the fuel cell.

    Safety and emerging regulation
    There are currently no IMO regulations to provide prescriptive requirements for fuel cell installations; they are in the process of being developed. These developments are being reviewed as an extension of low flash point fuel requirements. Safety issues pertaining to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, methane and other ‘lighter-than-air’ fuels, or propane (which is heavier than air), need special arrangements for ventilation to prevent the formation of the hazardous areas that are prone to explosion.

    For many fuel cells, the non-hydrogen supply is externally reformed to hydrogen and other byproducts prior to introduction into the fuel cell. So the hydrogen portion of the fuel system – from the reformer to the fuel cell - needs careful design consideration and features.
    Safety and operational reviews of fuel cell installations for marine and offshore assets primarily rely on risk-based studies in combination with IMO vessel regulations, IACS requirements, the applicable industrial standards and Rules or Guides based on the particular design and configuration of the fuel cell system.

    The International Code of Safety for Ships Using Gases or Other Low-Flashpoint Fuels, known as the IGF Code, is currently being revised to address the requirements for fuel cell systems; it is anticipated by industry that this will assist with the present safety challenges.
    To support and promote a safer and more sustainable practice as the industry increasingly adopts fuel cell systems, ABS will soon publish a Fuel Cell Guide on marine applications for the technology, including propulsion and other auxiliary uses. It will offer a structured approach to the application of fuel cell systems in a format that is flexible enough to include other gaseous fuels and any future technological upgrades.

    Shipowners are facing some challenging environmental decisions as more stringent regulations shift the course of their industry towards a more sustainable future: a 0.5% sulphur cap on fuel by the end of this year; a minimum 40% reduction in CO2 emissions from ships by 2030; a 50% reduction in GHG output by 2050; and potentially even more ambitious goals set by regional and national governments.  

    It may be time for them to start to consider what if any role fuel cells could play in providing a solution.

    Mr. Carlucci is currently the ABS Manager for Machinery, Electrical and Controls Technology. Since joining ABS in 2008 Carlucci has held several senior roles in asset integrity management, life cycle risk and reliability, design and plan review, and product and service development. With extensive experience in the marine and offshore industries, Carlucci’s expertise includes: hybrid power applications, ship systems operations and maintenance, systems designs, risk and reliability analysis (FMEA, RCM), and condition/performance monitoring. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Nuclear trained Surface Warfare Officer. Mr. Carlucci received his Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Duke University and a Master’s in Business Administration from University of Houston.

    This article first appeared in the March 2019 print edition of MarineNews magazine.

  • While debate continues on whether or not fuel cell-based power generation can be a viable proposition for the commercial marine market, its advocates in the engineering industry are making headway in giving practical form to the technology. The installation of a fuel cell power unit aboard a 12-m

  • European initiatives, both involving power systems supplier Wartsila Corporation, have given fresh impetus to the development and application of fuel cell technology aboard ship. The Finnish organization has entered into a pact with Danish firm Haldor Topsoe aimed at bringing cost-competitive fuel cell

  • German industry is doing much to advance the development and application of fuel cell technology, and is responsible for many of the initiatives launched so far in the marine sector. Although skeptics in the commercial shipping domain discount the chances of a substantial uptake of fuel cell power abo

  • willingness to push back the technological bounds when it announced at last year's SMM Exhibition in Hamburg that it had started development work on fuel cell marine propulsion. German propensity for front-line advance in engineering is also implicit in the nomination of Siemens PEM (proton exchange

  • full electric configurations. One of the newest alternative fuels and propulsion systems for maritime consideration is the fitting of hydrogen powered fuel cells. Arguments can be made for each, but how do you know if such a system is a good fit for your vessel and operating patterns?   The many and varied

  • the benefits of using its fuel to power ships and facilities in ports. The project is designed to meet CCDOTT goals for zero emissions from fuel cells, and the contract award comes as many operators in U.S. ports are facing potential fines for being well in excess of Environmental Protection

  • on shore, and I think that the Tesla Revolution is coming to the Seas. When it does, we are confident that we will be in front when that happens.”    Fuel Cells The use of fuel cells as an eco-friendly ship propulsion has also received a lot of attention from organizations such as Carnival and Royal Caribbean

  • as AIP systems (air independent propulsion), will power the submarines when submerged. The AIP system is produced by HDW with Siemens providing the fuel cell modules and the supervisory systems. Circle 12 on Reader Service Car

  • (Baseline) Diesel-Electric Diesel-Electric with 13.4 megawatt battery bank Diesel-electric with 26.8 megawatt battery bank Hydrogen Fuel Cell   To calibrate the results, EBDG selected a long-term client, Pierce County, for whom the firm has previously designed and built two double-ended

  • at the yard’s current orders, another noteworthy trend is the shift to dual fuel LNG-capable vessels from 2019, and then further on the utilization of fuel cell technologies starting in 2022.   Not only are these technologies an answer to regulation changes and customer demand, but also a selling point

  • . In the past couple of years, the discussion about alternative forms of propulsion increased, especially on the subject of gas turbines and hydrogen fuel cells (FC). Ships need a propulsion system that can provide reliable transportation from point A to point B within an acceptable period of time - with

  • MT Apr-19#56 Products Imaging
SubC Imaging Remote Ocean Systems SIDUS)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    Products Imaging SubC Imaging Remote Ocean Systems SIDUS Solutions, LLC ROS is an ISO-9001-2008 certi? ed company with a 28,000 sq. ft. research and manufacturing facility dedicated to producing products. Its product line includes underwater video cameras, lights, rugged pan and tilt positioning

  • MT Apr-19#5  Features S?C100 Series
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    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 5

    +1.410.771.8600 www.teledynees.com S?C - SUBSEA SUPERCHARGER Integral Features S?C100 Series Fuel Cell System Teledyne’s proven proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology provides excellent 4 efficiency and long life (>10,000 hrs.). The stack design is specifically tailored for operation with

  • MT May-19#41  end human dependence on fossil 
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    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 41

    immediately clear that this sys- tem and its development are a labor of love for the inventor who’s long-term goal is to end human dependence on fossil fuels. The patent was submitted in 2007 and issued in 2012. It is was created while Raftery worked at Stevens Institute of Technology, the renowned engineering

  • MT May-19#36  allow the expansion of berths, fuel oil tanks and stor- Development)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 36

    to incorporate an intermediate section was identi? ed, in The agreement between Brazil and France for the Subsea order to allow the expansion of berths, fuel oil tanks and stor- Development Program (PROSUB) has three basic premises: age spaces, thus increasing the original capacity of our sub- technology

  • MT May-19#11  Features S?C100 Series
Fuel Cell System
Teledyne’s proven)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 11

    +1.410.771.8600 www.teledynees.com S?C - SUBSEA SUPERCHARGER Integral Features S?C100 Series Fuel Cell System Teledyne’s proven proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology provides excellent 4 efficiency and long life (>10,000 hrs.). The stack design is specifically tailored for operation with

  • MR May-19#94  TANK TENDER monitors up to ten fuel and 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 94

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  • MR May-19#88  content Very Low 
Sulphur Fuel Oil (VLSFO). Shell Alexia)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 88

    40 – with a Base Number of 40 – a new two-stroke engine cylinder oil speci? cally for use with en- gines running on 0.5% sulfur content Very Low Sulphur Fuel Oil (VLSFO). Shell Alexia 40 has undergone thousands of hours of trials on board four ships with the latest engine types, using rep- resentative IMO

  • MR May-19#84  only 3 gal-
lons of diesel fuel per trip compared to 14)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 84

    trip of the day, running purely on battery and solar. The design ensures that on the longest days on the water, the boat burns only 3 gal- lons of diesel fuel per trip compared to 14 gallons per trip. Since the Squid can carry just over twice the passenger load of the old boat, the per person fossil fuel

  • MR May-19#83  Technology Alternative Marine Fuels
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Marine)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 83

    CLOSE: AUG 24 AD CLOSE: SEP 22 SEPTEMBER OCTOBER Satellite Communications Marine Design Annual MARKET MARKET Containership Technology Alternative Marine Fuels FEATURE: FEATURE: Marine Fire?ghting, Safety & TECHNICAL TECHNICAL Coatings: Deck, Hull and Tank FEATURE: FEATURE: Salvage PRODUCT PRODUCT Controls

  • MR May-19#79 BWMS: Special Advertorial
How to Engineer a Reliable)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 79

    BWMS: Special Advertorial How to Engineer a Reliable Ballast Water Management System By Pete Thompson, V.P. of Operations, Ecochlor Electrical engineer performs FAT on the Ecochlor treatment system generators at the new ProFlow manufacturing factory in North Haven, Connecticut USA. he ability of Ballast

  • MR May-19#76  FOR LOWER SULPHUR 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 76

    E EMISSION REDUCTION: TECHNOLOGY REPORT WOOD MACKENZIE FORECASTS A 25 PERCENT INCREASE IN PRICE FOR LOWER SULPHUR CONTENT FUEL BASED ON A SOX SCRUBBER ADOPTION RATE OF ABOUT TWO PERCENT, BUT SOME SCENARIOS COULD CAUSE LSFO PRICES TO SPIKE BY AS MUCH AS 60 PERCENT. percent. The price premium per metric

  • MR May-19#74  I: ENHANCING ENGINES & FUELS
round 80 percent of global)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 74

    Vice President of Sales, Eastern US, for Danfoss Drives in Houston, Texas. Preparing for IMO 2020: Marine Emission Solutions PART I: ENHANCING ENGINES & FUELS round 80 percent of global content 86 percent by the year 2020. A initial capital cost, they can retro? t their course to follow, ship operators

  • MR May-19#73  around the  of the low sulfur fuel oil post 2020, the  a decade)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 73

    Technology Report IMO 2020 Scrubbers: The Clock is Ticking By Ishaan Goel, Project Manager, Albion Marine egulatory bodies around the of the low sulfur fuel oil post 2020, the a decade, which is enough time for the stable in an otherwise very volatile and world are trying to address payback period can

  • MR May-19#70  speed so optimal engine ef-
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    to pro- allows propeller speed independent 2.5 hours, which is due solely vide signi? cant improvements in both of engine speed so optimal engine ef- fuel ef? ciency and vessel performance ? ciency can be achieved, leading to a to a technical testing proce- through a fully integrated hydro-me- projected

  • MR May-19#69  cruise ships to burn less fuel, run 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 69

    for its Multi-Engine Optimizer Caterpillar is touting its Multi-Engine Cat’s MEO Optimizer (MEO) as a solution for ex- isting cruise ships to burn less fuel, run cleaner, keep uptime and reliability high while keeping costs down. Caterpillar’s MEO is designed to lay over the top of a vessel’s existing

  • MR May-19#68  for a 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    , the Parntnership Sets Sights on Zero Emission Cruise Ships comapny says. The USCG Type Approval includes a requirement for a The Age of Hydrogen Fuel Cells minimum holding time be- tween ballast and de-ballast GE’s Power Conversion business native that truly meets the needs of concept for a multi-megawatt

  • MR May-19#58 , inclement weather,  lets and fueling, the company will ini-
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 58

    investigated. Among them are, col- with a main depot and waiting room, toi- navigational aides and infra- lision, overloading, inclement weather, lets and fueling, the company will ini- Photo Courtesy Alain Haig-Brown Dr. Roberta Weisbrod, Executive Director of the Worldwide Ferry Safety Association, was did

  • MR May-19#55  
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    same time. The industry is now on a path to Sub- chapter M compliance. USCG spokes- person, Lt. Amy Midgett, told Maritime Ultrasonic Cylinder pressure Fuel injector Cylinder liner Reporter & Engineering News: “In cleaning monitoring testing maintenance accordance with Subchapter M regu- lations, owners

  • MR May-19#53  2019, ?  eet growth 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 53

    barges (total capac- ity on the order of 23 million barrels) and more than 300 inland towboats pro- jected at the end of 2019, ? eet growth has been fueled by consolidation (rath- er than through newbuilds). Early in 2018, Kirby acquired Higman Marine Inc. with 159 inland tank barges and 75 boats

  • MR May-19#52  mischaracterized as tradition- fuels transportation along the)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    bunkering trades and in clean and dirty sateague (4,400 horsepower, paired with Administration (MARAD) and the ness, often mischaracterized as tradition- fuels transportation along the U.S. East the 80,000 bbl barge DS-801), working American Waterway Operators (AWO) al and slow-to-change (perhaps because

  • MR May-19#51  & Krenzer, Inc.
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  • MR May-19#50  
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    MARINE PROPULSION • THOUGHT LEADERSHIP “Even if the future of shipping some- times seems less clear today than it did 10 years ago, operational and fuel ? exibility remains one of the key elements to reduce in- vestment risks in cutting edge technology. We need to ensure that our solutions work as

  • MR May-19#49  much capacity 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    that meet or beat emission regula- tion. Stiefel, WinGD For the next decade or so the case is clear: There is still so much capacity to grow LNG as fuel across our industry. We are really just at the beginning with LNG so there is room for further improvement of ef? ciency and emissions. Further

  • MR May-19#48  next big thing on fuels is LNG. 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    MARINE PROPULSION • THOUGHT LEADERSHIP “The next big thing on fuels is LNG. We are a long way from identifying a fuel which offers the same viability, in terms of in- frastructure, beyond LNG at the moment. LNG is the necessary bridge which is getting us closer to a carbon neutral future. Already