Fuel Cell

  • A maritime consortium, including ABS and Sandia National Laboratories, recently proved the viability of a hydrogen fuel cell ferry designed for operations in the environmentally sensitive San Francisco Bay area.  

    The IMO’s mandate to cap the sulfur content in marine fuel at the start of next year may be the biggest regulatory change in shipping since the requirement for double hulls, but the challenge will fade in comparison to its future goals to reduce green-house gases (GHG).

    A year ago (April 2018), the IMO agreed to a preliminary strategy that targeted a minimum 40% reduction in CO2 emissions on a cargo-tonne mile basis by 2030, and a 50% reduction in GHG emissions from shipping by 2050. To support and inform that goal, the mandatory collection of emissions data from ships started in January. The IMO’s final strategy will be unveiled in 2023. In the interim, it is committed to release its fourth GHG study, and to analyze and report the findings from three years of having collected data on the industry’s emissions.

    The mandatory global targets to reduce the emissions from shipping are the most ambitious yet: they will require measures that combine improvements in ship design; the creation of new fuels and alternative forms of propulsion; operational changes; and the application of digital technology. Because those goals are unlikely to be met without the development of new technology, industry and governments will need to expand the resources they make available for research and development.

    A technology with potential
    One area of promise for energy generation onboard ships is fuel cells. Fuel cells are presently used in a variety of land applications, such as to provide power in remote areas, as well as for industrial, residential and commercial buildings. Energy from hydrogen fuel cells, in particular, is already used in land-based transport vehicles, such as municipal buses, trains and heavy-duty trucks, as well as for industrial equipment such as forklifts.

    While submarines have been built recently with hybrid propulsion units using hydrogen fuels cells, its use in the commercial shipping sector largely has been limited to auxiliary purposes: fuel cells can provide shipboard heat and power – including ‘hotel’ power, such as that required on cruise ships – and ‘cold ironing’, providing an alternative shoreside power source that allows ships to shut down their engines while at dock, lessening their emissions output.  

    Additionally, there has been a lot of research and prototyping in the maritime sector to investigate applications on small passenger ferries and other short-sea vessels. ABS, in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, recently confirmed the feasibility of high-speed, hydrogen-fueled ferries for use in the San Francisco Bay area. Separately, Norway late last year provided the funding for construction of a hydrogen-powered high-speed ferry and a short-sea freighter.

    Potential, and Challenges
    Hydrogen fuel cells technology has the potential to offer reliable, long-range power on an industrial scale, with relatively quick refueling when compared to the emerging battery-powered options. Hydrogen itself has higher energy density than batteries, potentially making fuel-cell systems more practical for operators looking to replace or supplement traditional bunker-fuelled propulsion units.

    However, sourcing of hydrogen can be energy intensive. Without the incorporation of renewably generated hydrogen, the net impact on GHG gas for hydrogen produced by methane or similar processes is negligible. Also, adopting hydrogen as a deepsea marine fuel is not without challenges, even before safety factors are considered.

    It is important to compare the energy density of different energy sources – including fuel cells – to better understand how they need to mature before they will be suitable for global shipping, where the carriage of cargo is the main focus. In general, fuel cell systems require less maintenance (potentially offering lower maintenance costs) and long service lives. They also generate less noise than present heavy oil power plants, contributing to a more comfortable work environment for the crew and less disruption for  the surrounding marine life.

    The suitability of fuel cell systems for hybrid propulsion solutions – coupled with diesel – has an extensive track record. But perhaps most importantly for proactive owners looking for a path to IMO emissions compliance in 2030 and 2050, hydrogen fuel cell systems would generate zero GHGs; their only by-product from energy generation is water. Another key challenge will be for the marine industry to develop a hydrogen-distribution system that is capable of producing and distributing the significant quantities required for a global network of large ships.

    The refineries are adjusting their production processes to accommodate increases in demand as alternate fuels gain popularity, but the supply networks will need to mature before the marine industry will feel confident enough to widely adopt power systems that utilize fuel cells. As a power generation technology, fuel cells are comparatively mature. Shipowners may want to look at the technology as something more than a ‘future fuel’ and instead recognize its present benefits to the marine industry as they act to reduce the carbon footprints of their fleets and steer towards a more sustainable future.

    How fuel cell systems work
    A fuel cell is a device that converts the chemical energy from a fuel into electricity via an electrochemical reaction of the fuel with oxygen, or other oxidizing agents. They differ from batteries in that fuel cells require a continuous source of fuel and oxygen (usually from the air) to sustain the chemical reaction, whereas the availability of energy from a battery is fixed by the amount of energy it has stored. Fuel cells can produce electricity continuously as long as fuel and oxygen are supplied to them.

    There are many types of designs for fuel cells. Most consist of an anode, cathode and an electrolyte that allows positively charged hydrogen ions (known as protons) to move from the anode to the cathode side of the fuel cell.

    Safety and emerging regulation
    There are currently no IMO regulations to provide prescriptive requirements for fuel cell installations; they are in the process of being developed. These developments are being reviewed as an extension of low flash point fuel requirements. Safety issues pertaining to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, methane and other ‘lighter-than-air’ fuels, or propane (which is heavier than air), need special arrangements for ventilation to prevent the formation of the hazardous areas that are prone to explosion.

    For many fuel cells, the non-hydrogen supply is externally reformed to hydrogen and other byproducts prior to introduction into the fuel cell. So the hydrogen portion of the fuel system – from the reformer to the fuel cell - needs careful design consideration and features.
    Safety and operational reviews of fuel cell installations for marine and offshore assets primarily rely on risk-based studies in combination with IMO vessel regulations, IACS requirements, the applicable industrial standards and Rules or Guides based on the particular design and configuration of the fuel cell system.

    The International Code of Safety for Ships Using Gases or Other Low-Flashpoint Fuels, known as the IGF Code, is currently being revised to address the requirements for fuel cell systems; it is anticipated by industry that this will assist with the present safety challenges.
    To support and promote a safer and more sustainable practice as the industry increasingly adopts fuel cell systems, ABS will soon publish a Fuel Cell Guide on marine applications for the technology, including propulsion and other auxiliary uses. It will offer a structured approach to the application of fuel cell systems in a format that is flexible enough to include other gaseous fuels and any future technological upgrades.

    Shipowners are facing some challenging environmental decisions as more stringent regulations shift the course of their industry towards a more sustainable future: a 0.5% sulphur cap on fuel by the end of this year; a minimum 40% reduction in CO2 emissions from ships by 2030; a 50% reduction in GHG output by 2050; and potentially even more ambitious goals set by regional and national governments.  

    It may be time for them to start to consider what if any role fuel cells could play in providing a solution.

    Mr. Carlucci is currently the ABS Manager for Machinery, Electrical and Controls Technology. Since joining ABS in 2008 Carlucci has held several senior roles in asset integrity management, life cycle risk and reliability, design and plan review, and product and service development. With extensive experience in the marine and offshore industries, Carlucci’s expertise includes: hybrid power applications, ship systems operations and maintenance, systems designs, risk and reliability analysis (FMEA, RCM), and condition/performance monitoring. He served in the U.S. Navy as a Nuclear trained Surface Warfare Officer. Mr. Carlucci received his Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Duke University and a Master’s in Business Administration from University of Houston.

    This article first appeared in the March 2019 print edition of MarineNews magazine.

  • While debate continues on whether or not fuel cell-based power generation can be a viable proposition for the commercial marine market, its advocates in the engineering industry are making headway in giving practical form to the technology. The installation of a fuel cell power unit aboard a 12-m

  • European initiatives, both involving power systems supplier Wartsila Corporation, have given fresh impetus to the development and application of fuel cell technology aboard ship. The Finnish organization has entered into a pact with Danish firm Haldor Topsoe aimed at bringing cost-competitive fuel cell

  • German industry is doing much to advance the development and application of fuel cell technology, and is responsible for many of the initiatives launched so far in the marine sector. Although skeptics in the commercial shipping domain discount the chances of a substantial uptake of fuel cell power abo

  • willingness to push back the technological bounds when it announced at last year's SMM Exhibition in Hamburg that it had started development work on fuel cell marine propulsion. German propensity for front-line advance in engineering is also implicit in the nomination of Siemens PEM (proton exchange

  • full electric configurations. One of the newest alternative fuels and propulsion systems for maritime consideration is the fitting of hydrogen powered fuel cells. Arguments can be made for each, but how do you know if such a system is a good fit for your vessel and operating patterns?   The many and varied

  • the benefits of using its fuel to power ships and facilities in ports. The project is designed to meet CCDOTT goals for zero emissions from fuel cells, and the contract award comes as many operators in U.S. ports are facing potential fines for being well in excess of Environmental Protection

  • on shore, and I think that the Tesla Revolution is coming to the Seas. When it does, we are confident that we will be in front when that happens.”    Fuel Cells The use of fuel cells as an eco-friendly ship propulsion has also received a lot of attention from organizations such as Carnival and Royal Caribbean

  • as AIP systems (air independent propulsion), will power the submarines when submerged. The AIP system is produced by HDW with Siemens providing the fuel cell modules and the supervisory systems. Circle 12 on Reader Service Car

  • Hydrogen fuel cell technology to Satisfy Future IMO RequirementsWith an ongoing push by the maritime community to reduce ship emissions to satisfy IMO MARPOL Annex VI regulations and limit the sulfur content of ships from 01 January 2020 to 0.5 percent world-wide, many ship owners are starting to consider

  • (Baseline) Diesel-Electric Diesel-Electric with 13.4 megawatt battery bank Diesel-electric with 26.8 megawatt battery bank Hydrogen Fuel Cell   To calibrate the results, EBDG selected a long-term client, Pierce County, for whom the firm has previously designed and built two double-ended

  • at the yard’s current orders, another noteworthy trend is the shift to dual fuel LNG-capable vessels from 2019, and then further on the utilization of fuel cell technologies starting in 2022.   Not only are these technologies an answer to regulation changes and customer demand, but also a selling point

  • MR Sep-19#49  two more 
Second-Gen Methanol Fueled Ships
hile shipowners)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 49

    V VESSELS SHIP OF THE MONTH Waterfront Shipping takes two more Second-Gen Methanol Fueled Ships hile shipowners continue The two new vessels – together with “On an energy-equiva- to actively debate the another two vessels that will be delivered lent basis, methanol is best means and method by year-end

  • MR Sep-19#48  the ?  rst natural gas fueled  and safety systems.)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    tem and an integrated ship monitoring, LNG control enabling the loading of tall and large cargo without GmbH are developing the ? rst natural gas fueled and safety systems. The design was recon? gured to worry of any disruption to forward visibility during shallow draft pushboat design – the RApide

  • MR Sep-19#43  they  Collection system for fuel oil consumption of ships)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    a major attack EU MRV and amendments to MARPOL Annex VI on Data vector for cyber criminals, so training them to ensure that they Collection system for fuel oil consumption of ships, new cy- are completely aware of the risks and consequences is crucial ber security guidelines in TMSA version 3 and IMO 2021

  • MR Sep-19#41  on Data Collection system for fuel oil con-
of detecting and)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    educational standpoint, in order to stand the best chance performance vs cost equation, we see that 512kbps up Annex VI on Data Collection system for fuel oil con- of detecting and responding to cyber-attacks. to about 4Mbps as the current sweet spot where the sumption of ships are part of the change

  • MR Sep-19#38  automation and analytics. it’s fuel savings or reduced maintenance)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 38

    that they can sell whatever they’re selling, whether last year and investments today are focused on three terms of factory automation and analytics. it’s fuel savings or reduced maintenance or route plan- areas. ning … there are many applications for IOT, but the one 1. KVH Watch: IOT for maritime is going

  • MR Sep-19#35 MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA”
mixed with air ammonia could)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 35

    MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA” mixed with air ammonia could become gineering projects assessing the feasibil- two-stroke engine. In a perfect world, clear based on the number and timing ? ammable at a 15 to 28 percent concen- ity of using ammonia as a marine fuel. research efforts in the maritime and of

  • MR Sep-19#34 MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA”
transporting bulk ammonia)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 34

    MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA” transporting bulk ammonia over long degrees Celsius. LPG carriers usually of either the refrigeration system or the atmospheric pressure or at normal am- distances. These vessels maintain their transport between 15,000 and 85,000 primary barrier. bient temperatures at

  • MR Sep-19#33  One of  tively, a reversible fuel cell may be used  concluded)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 33

    processing the compressed to form ammonia. Alterna- transport, the Statkraft feasibility study substance to form methanol. One of tively, a reversible fuel cell may be used concluded that compressed hydrogen Methods of Renewable the major bene? ts of methanol is that it directly to produce ammonia.

  • MR Sep-19#32 MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA”
Above
LPG vessel 
Clipper)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 32

    MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA” Above LPG vessel Clipper Saturn. Below LPG vessel Clipper Odin. Photos credit Solvang ASA 32 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • SEPTEMBER 2019 MR #9 (26-33).indd 32 MR #9 (26-33).indd 32 9/11/2019 9:46:59 AM9/11/2019 9:46:59 AM

  • MR Sep-19#31  
energy and heat with fuel cells, gas tur- project to)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 31

    Svalbard it will mark the ? rst large-scale national electrical grid in Norway. This to achieve an installed electrical capacity energy and heat with fuel cells, gas tur- project to provide a community heat and prevents the owners of the wind farm, of between 40 and 50 MW. This installed bines, or combustion

  • MR Sep-19#30 MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA”
Longyearbyen is the 
largest)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    MARINE FUEL: “GREEN AMMONIA” Longyearbyen is the largest town in Svalbard and may become one of the ? rst large scale con- sumers of green hydrogen or ammonia produced from wind farms in Finnmark. Photo credit Visit Svalbard. 30 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • SEPTEMBER 2019 MR #9 (26-33).

  • MR Sep-19#29  EPA Tier 3, China  common-rail fuel injection, double over-
1)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    D8 MH is an in-line ulations, as well as international emis- 6-cylinder, 7.7-liter diesel engine with sions standards – US EPA Tier 3, China common-rail fuel injection, double over- 1 & 2, and NRMM IWW Stage V. The head camshafts and twin-entry turbo, product will be released in two steps: the featuring

  • MR Sep-19#28  PowerPoint and tech- tem, anew fuel injection system, a new)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 28

    is not simply debuting including a new engine management sys- tri? cation, waterway transport in big new product via PowerPoint and tech- tem, anew fuel injection system, a new at building a multi-modal transport sys- cities – whether it’s goods, whether it’s nical speci? cation, but to engage those

  • MR Sep-19#13  can build  a transition fuel, with demand gradually)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 13

    by 2026. But others see it more as ment decisions (FID). subject to regulation, price ? uctuations Only a handful of shipyards can build a transition fuel, with demand gradually Any FSRU project – small to full scale and national laws may make it more dif- at the level of complexity that is required

  • MR Sep-19#12  demand for the units  transport fuel is historically well proven:)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 12

    for supplying energy and bon forms of energy and de- is driving interest in ? oating storage and strained places, so demand for the units transport fuel is historically well proven: mand for cost-effective ways regasi? cation units (FSRU). is increasing and the business case for they offer faster

  • MR Sep-19#6 .com
Vice President, Sales
 Fuel for Thought
Rob Howard)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    John C. O’Malley jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher/Editorial Director Greg Trauthwein trauthwein@marinelink.com Vice President, Sales Fuel for Thought Rob Howard howard@marinelink.com Web Contributor Michelle Howard mhoward@marinelink.com Editorial Contributors This is a historic edition

  • MR Sep-19#5 . Our innovative 
dual-fuel LPG engine lets you de-risk)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 5

    your investments New MAN B&W ME-LGIP engine The 2020 SO regulations throw the world of X ocean transport into uncertainty. Our innovative dual-fuel LPG engine lets you de-risk shipbuilding investments and take back control. By switching to LPG, you stay compliant ZKLOHUHWDLQLQJWKHÁH[LELOLW\WRWDNHDGYD

  • MT Jul-19#72 MTR 100
Remote Ocean 
Systems 
San Diego, California
Preside)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 72

    MTR 100 Remote Ocean Systems San Diego, California President/CEO: Bob Acks No. of Employees: 30+ www.rosys.com Remote Ocean Systems is an ISO 9001- 2015 certi? ed company with a 28,000 sq. ft. research and manufacturing facility dedi- Oceanology International cated to producing products that are reliable

  • MT Jul-19#71  pack ice, aiding  thus saving fuel and reducing environmental)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 71

    ? elds, and also to ing additional bene? ts in optimizing how the diesels are run, detect and identify icebergs embedded in pack ice, aiding thus saving fuel and reducing environmental impact. navigators to identify the safest, most ef? cient route through AKA’s full scope of supply for the Spitsbergen

  • MT Jul-19#57  with its 80-160kW hydrogen fuel cell power, and down to 
water)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 57

    hundreds of miles, depending on the vehicle con? guration, modules. The thinking behind it is that today’s subsea under- with its 80-160kW hydrogen fuel cell power, and down to water vehicle market is dominated by specialized products, thousands of meters water depth. Hydrogen fuel cells are a with

  • MT Jul-19#52  hull and various payload and/or fuel 
combinations, the vessel)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    0.75m or 1.50m section subsea environment. This year alone the company has the company, this ? lled a capability gap of hull and various payload and/or fuel combinations, the vessel can operate in launched a further Ultra High De? nition for users of portable Remotely Operated sparker for sub-bottom

  • MT Jul-19#51  Robotics has developed a fuel cell powered long  powered)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 51

    is crucial, she said, Cellula Vancouver, BC, Canada; President/CEO: Eric Jackson No. of Employees: 35; www.cellula.com Cellula Robotics has developed a fuel cell powered long powered with 250kWh usable energy, enabling the afore- range unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) called Solus-LR mentioned 2000km mission

  • MT Jul-19#49 Southwest Electronic Energy Corp., 
an Ultralife Company)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 49

    Southwest Electronic Energy Corp., an Ultralife Company Houston, Texas, Michael D. Popielec, CEO No. of Employees : 70, www.swe.com SWE SWE has pioneered underwater lith- battery system to meet the intense power lifetime. ium-ion battery solutions that power needs of a customer’s next-generation

  • MT Jul-19#41  to signi?  cant 
(10%) fuel savings for the company)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 41

    of the pilot are promising, and BW Dry Cargo’s Managing Direc- tor, Christian Bon? ls, believes Miros’ technology can contribute to signi? cant (10%) fuel savings for the company. Andreas Brekke, CEO, Miros. Photo: Greg Trauthwein www.marinetechnologynews.com Marine Technology Reporter 41 MTR #6 (34-49)