Panama Canal

  • Panama Canal expansion will cost operators, insurers

    As the Panama Canal prepares to celebrate its 100th anniversary, insurers are warning of the increased risks that will arise from the plan to double the cargo-carrying capacity of the world’s most famous canal.
    In a report entitled Panama Canal 100: Shipping Safety and Future Risks, Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS) identifies that the value of insured goods transiting the canal zone may increase by over $1 billion per day following completion of the Third Set of Locks Project, which will see two new sets of locks built, creating a third transit lane for larger ships.
    Today, more than 12,000 ships navigate the canal each year, a number that should increase following the anticipated opening of the new locks in 2015. It is forecast the expansion will enable between 12 and 14 larger vessels per day, or approximately 4,750 additional ships per year, to pass through the canal. Of particular significance is that many of these ships are expected to be new-Panamax class container vessels of 12,600 teu, which are almost three times larger than the existing largest vessels able to access the canal (4,400 teu).
    With approximately 3 percent ($270 billion) of world maritime commerce ($9 trillion) already transiting the Panama Canal every year, the safe passage of vessels is critical. However, AGCS warns the increased traffic and larger vessels may challenge the Panama Canal’s improved safety record over the past decade with the risks exacerbated through the initial period of the canal opening.
    “Larger ships automatically pose greater risks,” said Captain Rahul Khanna, AGCS’s Global Head of Marine Risk Consulting. “The sheer amount of cargo carried means a serious casualty has the potential to lead to a sizeable loss and greater disruption.”
    Post-expansion, if operating at full projected capacity, AGCS estimates that this could result in an additional $1.25 billion in insured goods passing through the canal in one day, with larger ships playing a critical role in increasing throughput capacity.
    An additional element to consider, and one that has been at the forefront of many salvage conference agendas for many years as vessels grow increasingly large: such vessels can pose serious salvage challenges in a congested shipping environment, even potentially leading to blockages. In the event of an accident there may be an insufficient number of qualified experienced salvage experts available to handle the ships.
    AGCS believes training is key to mitigating the new risks involved, both in the canal region itself and in affected ports.  “The expansion of the Panama Canal will represent a new shipping environment for many mariners,” said Captain Khanna. “Due to the increase in the number of larger vessels passing through this important waterway the level of training provided to pilots will be extremely important. Attempting to maneuver one of these vessels through such a restricted space in itself creates a much bigger hazard.” The Panama Canal Authority has invested heavily in training, including plans to charter a post-Panamax ship to practice maneuvers through the new lane.

    Losses in Perspective
    While the focus is on potential losses, it’s worthy to note that the Panama Canal region has a steadily improving safety record, with only 27 shipping casualties over the past decade and just two total losses. This accident rate of around 1 in every 4000 transits compares favorably with other major waterways such as the Suez Canal (1 in 1100 transits) and the Kiel Canal (1 in 830 transits). As the most frequently transiting types of vessel, bulk carriers (11), cargo ships (9) and container ships (9) dominate the canal’s casualty list, collectively accounting for over 75 percent of all incidents since 2002.
     

    (As published in the August 2014 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter)

  • . The simulator is now located in Balboa, Republic of Panama. It will be used as part of an overall program in the training of pilots for the Panama Canal in ship handling. The simulator was purchased from Tracor Hydronautics as a result of a competitive procurement based on specifications and

  • , Thunderbolt, Ga. They are the first of a new generation of shiphandling and firefighting tugs specifically designed for work in the Panama Canal. The main feature of these tugboats is the capability of the propellers, located just forward of amidship, to be rotated 360 degrees, enabling the

  • The Panama Canal is a strategic crossroads for maritime traffic, and is arguably one of the most important maritime developments in the past century. Here we take a deeper dive into the history behind that famous strip of waterway.The present canal, which saw its first vessel transits in 1914, along with

  • Solidur Plastics Co., Delmont, Pa., supplied an Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) marine fender system for the locks at the Panama Canal to protect oceangoing ships from the damaging impacts of bumping into the lockwalls. Jorge Quijano, chief of the Locks Division, Panama Canal

  • British marine engineering firm introduced it. The Esperanza was built by Houma Fabricators Inc., Houma, La. The 99-foot harbor tug, owned by the Panama Canal Commission, has twin 1,500-hp General Motors EMD diesels and is rated at 90,000 pounds of foward bollard pull and 72,000 pounds of reverse bollard

  • The Panama Canal’s impact on shipping routes and vessel sizes since it opened in 1914 is undisputed. This will continue with the opening of a third channel for larger vessels in 2016. This briefing examines the risk management impact of this expansion on the maritime industry.   Why is the Panama Canal

  • program at the Academy. The scholarship he has established will perpetuate his family's longtime interest in and commitment to the welfare of the Panama Canal and the Republic of Panama

  • A group of French ship repairers led by the Port of Marseilles Authority has disclosed plans for turning the old Panama Canal Co.'s drydocks at Balboa into a modern repair facility. A few weeks ago the group, which includes Chantiers Navals de La Ciotat, received approval from the Panama Canal

  • Dravo SteelShip Corporation has announced the recent completion and delivery of nine 48-foot pilot boats for the Panama Canal Commission. The single-screw pilot launches have all been delivered to the Canal Zone under their own power. They were delivered two at a time for safety measures. The 2

  • . The two 1,300-cubic-yard barges, the first to be built by NABRICO for the Commission, will be used in the on-going dredging operations in the Panama Canal. Each is classed by the American Bureau of Shipping as an unmanned ocean service barge complete with loadline. A steel reinforced four-inch

  • Moss Point Marine, Inc., Escatawpa, Miss., has completed the all-steel, 105-foot harbor tug, Paz, to the Panama Canal Commission, Republic of Panama. Original construction was begun by another shipyard which did not complete the vessel due to inclement weather and a decision by its management to

  • MR Nov-19#81  tonnage:  311,374 tons
Flag:   Panama
The new vessel is equipped)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 81

    to the sea Vessel Particulars Length o.a.: 339.5 m Breadth: 60 m Depth: 28.5 m Gross tonnage: 160,597 tons Deadweight tonnage: 311,374 tons Flag: Panama The new vessel is equipped with a scrubber that is compliant with the Inter- national Maritime Organization’s (IMO) more stringent SOx emission regulation

  • MR Nov-19#74 E
EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES
Schottel Propulsion for)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 74

    E EMISSION REDUCTION TECH FILES Schottel Propulsion for Emission-Free Push Boat The agreement between Wärtsilä and Norsepower will pro- mote the use of Rotor Sails & support sustainable shipping. Wärtsilä, Norsepower Sign Agreement The technology group Wärtsilä and Norsepower, a provider of low maintenance

  • MR Nov-19#41 WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY
“No vessel can maneuver)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    WORKBOATS SOUTHERN TOWING COMPANY “No vessel can maneuver a tow into or out of a dock as good as the Z drive. And then you start talking about bumps and bruises on your barges, a lot of which come when you’re docking and undocking ... the safety contribution that Z-drives makes to marine transpor- tation

  • MR Nov-19#25  Nelson Street, Panama City, FL 32401
Email:)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    NEW CONSTRUCTION • REPAIRS • CONVERSIONS 2200 Nelson Street, Panama City, FL 32401 Email: sberthold@easternshipbuilding.com www.easternshipbuilding.com TEL: 850-763-1900 Diversity Visit Us at Booth #3115 Underway Dec. 4-6 in We look forward to serving you in 2020 and beyond! New Orleans MR #11 (18-25).

  • MN Nov-19#94 VESSELS
SCHOTTEL Delivers Propulsion for World’s First)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 94

    VESSELS SCHOTTEL Delivers Propulsion for World’s First Emission-Free Pushboat eration of Maritime Systems at the Technical University of Berlin, will be equipped with rudderpropellers from SCHOTTEL. The hybrid canal push boat is powered by a combination of fuel cells, batteries and an electric motor.

  • MN Nov-19#8 Authors   Contributors
&
MarineNews 
November 2019
Volume)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Authors Contributors & MarineNews November 2019 Volume 30 Number 11 Huxley- Paine Custard Reynard Buddy Custard is the President and Michael Gerhardt is Vice President, Chief Executive Of? cer of the Alaska Mar- Dredging Contractors of America, and itime Prevention & Response Network. the CDMCS

  • MP Q3-19#15  provide ROI to shareholders.  Panama. MIT offers an array of)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 15

    order to meet customer de- sight solution with Manzanillo International Terminal (MIT) in mands, maintain proftability and provide ROI to shareholders. Panama. MIT offers an array of handling services, providing con- nectivity to 129 ports in 48 countries. After leveraging Tideworks How many terminals/customers

  • MR Oct-19#65 ,
list Catholic Church of Panama City  Bisso White.  White)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 65

    . McQuone of St. John’s the Evange- the company’s then President Beverly ESG Designation: Hull 225 Aft Capstan: Markey Machinery, list Catholic Church of Panama City Bisso White. White was instrumental Fuel Oil: 28,000 USG Tow Hook: Washington Chain & Supply blessed the vessel and Father Luke in the management

  • MR Oct-19#33 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
fuel costs due to IMO2020 could)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 33

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL fuel costs due to IMO2020 could prompt (as termed by the eminent geography be 400,000 TEUs in 2014. bound from the Gulf of Mexico to the 1.2 million TEUs inbound to the U.S. professor Jean-Paul Rodrigue) as a link Panama Canal Authority, now deriv- U.S. West Coast. to

  • MR Oct-19#31 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
early 2016. By 2019, multiple)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 31

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL early 2016. By 2019, multiple export travelling in ballast…” typically after (which began in late 2015); these move shipping, has the potential to bring about facilities had already come online, with discharging on the U.S. West Coast and on Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCCs)

  • MR Oct-19#30 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
IMO2020, impacting all aspects of)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL IMO2020, impacting all aspects of shipping, has the po- tential to bring about a backslide in the East Coast’s traf? c gains. Joshua Hurwitz, Senior Consultant at port designer ? rm Moffaft & Nichol has made the case that in- creased fuel costs due to IMO2020 could prompt 1.

  • MR Oct-19#29 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
in the event of military activity)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 29

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL in the event of military activity, drove an ef- lantic. Transits by other well known, but long to be the ? rst ship through the widened canal, fort at Canal expansion, in the early 1940s, gone, U.S. carriers including Grace Line, sailing westwards. Five days later, in the

  • MR Oct-19#28 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
28     Maritime Reporter &)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 28

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL 28 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • OCTOBER 2019 MR #10 (26-33).indd 28 10/7/2019 11:57:41 AM

  • MR Oct-19#27 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
Panama
Canal
The Panama Canal is)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL Panama Canal The Panama Canal is a strategic crossroads for maritime traf? c, and is arguably one of the most important maritime developments in the past century. Here we take a deeper dive into the history behind that famous strip of wateray. By Barry Parker he present canal

  • MR Oct-19#26 HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL
26     Maritime Reporter &)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    HISTORY THE PANAMA CANAL 26 Maritime Reporter & Engineering News • OCTOBER 2019 MR #10 (26-33).indd 26 10/4/2019 10:05:08 AM

  • MR Oct-19#2 .
By  Greg Trauthwein
The Panama Canal
26
At long look at)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2

    Image Credit: © 2019 Martijn Gijsbertsen / Marco Vet 34 Born to Design CEO Basjan Faber powers C-Job full steam ahead. By Greg Trauthwein The Panama Canal 26 At long look at the strategic crossroads for the maritime world By Barry Parker U.S.Merchant Marine Academy Maritime Museum. Look Back, 40 Forge

  • MN Mar-19#43 SAFETY
that’s Sub M with a TSMS. Look at  system to)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 43

    SAFETY that’s Sub M with a TSMS. Look at system to continuously improve. Ken your risks and minimize them. You do Hebert is living proof that not only it everyday in the offce, in the wheel- can the small company comply with house or on deck. Now do it with the Sub M but that the three-boat com- bigger

  • MN Mar-19#35 TOWING COMPANY PROFILE
Hometown boy done good.
A self-made)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    TOWING COMPANY PROFILE Hometown boy done good. A self-made man, the late Capt. Beau Payne was a Miami River Rat who worked his way from rags to riches. “We grew up poor,” said Cathy. “Our mom was a barmaid. Beau was drawn to the water, instinctively, fshing the canals fshing near our frst Miami home.

  • MR Sep-19#48  the 
in 2025. The 12,470-ton Panama-?  ag ships will mea-
Additiona)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    that will become effective 8V4000M55R-N Tier III gas safe main engines. dependent tank connection spaces attached to the in 2025. The 12,470-ton Panama-? ag ships will mea- Additional to the engines, MTU also acts as the LNG tank, one for each engine. sure 138 x 23.6 x 8.3 m and will be delivered

  • MT Sep-19#54 Tech Files Robotics
con?  guration. tion, while optimizing)
    September 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 54

    Tech Files Robotics con? guration. tion, while optimizing the route for speed. To do so, each CVP In demonstrations in an MIT pool and in computer simu- precomputes all collision-free regions around the moving lations, groups of linked roboat units rearranged themselves CVP as it rotates and moves away

  • MT Sep-19#53 Meet the Shape-
Shif  ing Autonomous 
Boats from MIT
ats
By)
    September 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 53

    Meet the Shape- Shif ing Autonomous Boats from MIT ats By Rob Matheson, MIT MIT’s ? eet of robotic boats has been updated with new ca- pabilities to “shapeshift,” by autonomously disconnecting and reassembling into a variety of con? gurations, to form ? oating structures in Amsterdam’s many canals.

  • MT Sep-19#44  to NUWC Newport or NSWC Panama City. But 
what I ?  nd)
    September 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 44

    in either think we’re well known. We’re not big – about 150 people government, the private sector, or in academia. – compared to NUWC Newport or NSWC Panama City. But what I ? nd exciting is the fact that we have scientists who Part of our governance is the NATO Science & Technol- come here with their

  • MP Q3-19#8  with the expansion of the Panama Canal now safely in our choppy)
    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 8

    breakbulk every day. This story, central to the editorial focus of this folio, begins on page 28. else … Separately, and with the expansion of the Panama Canal now safely in our choppy wake, the advent of ever larger vessels, expressed in terms of deadweight tons, TEU capacity, deep draft or any of a

  • MR Aug-19#71  and with a capacity of up to Panamax. In addition to the docks)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 71

    facility offers three (3) graving OSVs, MPSV’s, offshore construction vessels, diesel electric vessels, dredges, docks and with a capacity of up to Panamax. In addition to the docks, the facil- ATB’s, offshore tugs, Z-drive harbor tugs, inland towboats, ro-ro/passenger ity also offers modern, enclosed