Panama Canal

  • Panama Canal expansion will cost operators, insurers

    As the Panama Canal prepares to celebrate its 100th anniversary, insurers are warning of the increased risks that will arise from the plan to double the cargo-carrying capacity of the world’s most famous canal.
    In a report entitled Panama Canal 100: Shipping Safety and Future Risks, Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS) identifies that the value of insured goods transiting the canal zone may increase by over $1 billion per day following completion of the Third Set of Locks Project, which will see two new sets of locks built, creating a third transit lane for larger ships.
    Today, more than 12,000 ships navigate the canal each year, a number that should increase following the anticipated opening of the new locks in 2015. It is forecast the expansion will enable between 12 and 14 larger vessels per day, or approximately 4,750 additional ships per year, to pass through the canal. Of particular significance is that many of these ships are expected to be new-Panamax class container vessels of 12,600 teu, which are almost three times larger than the existing largest vessels able to access the canal (4,400 teu).
    With approximately 3 percent ($270 billion) of world maritime commerce ($9 trillion) already transiting the Panama Canal every year, the safe passage of vessels is critical. However, AGCS warns the increased traffic and larger vessels may challenge the Panama Canal’s improved safety record over the past decade with the risks exacerbated through the initial period of the canal opening.
    “Larger ships automatically pose greater risks,” said Captain Rahul Khanna, AGCS’s Global Head of Marine Risk Consulting. “The sheer amount of cargo carried means a serious casualty has the potential to lead to a sizeable loss and greater disruption.”
    Post-expansion, if operating at full projected capacity, AGCS estimates that this could result in an additional $1.25 billion in insured goods passing through the canal in one day, with larger ships playing a critical role in increasing throughput capacity.
    An additional element to consider, and one that has been at the forefront of many salvage conference agendas for many years as vessels grow increasingly large: such vessels can pose serious salvage challenges in a congested shipping environment, even potentially leading to blockages. In the event of an accident there may be an insufficient number of qualified experienced salvage experts available to handle the ships.
    AGCS believes training is key to mitigating the new risks involved, both in the canal region itself and in affected ports.  “The expansion of the Panama Canal will represent a new shipping environment for many mariners,” said Captain Khanna. “Due to the increase in the number of larger vessels passing through this important waterway the level of training provided to pilots will be extremely important. Attempting to maneuver one of these vessels through such a restricted space in itself creates a much bigger hazard.” The Panama Canal Authority has invested heavily in training, including plans to charter a post-Panamax ship to practice maneuvers through the new lane.

    Losses in Perspective
    While the focus is on potential losses, it’s worthy to note that the Panama Canal region has a steadily improving safety record, with only 27 shipping casualties over the past decade and just two total losses. This accident rate of around 1 in every 4000 transits compares favorably with other major waterways such as the Suez Canal (1 in 1100 transits) and the Kiel Canal (1 in 830 transits). As the most frequently transiting types of vessel, bulk carriers (11), cargo ships (9) and container ships (9) dominate the canal’s casualty list, collectively accounting for over 75 percent of all incidents since 2002.
     

    (As published in the August 2014 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter)

  • . The simulator is now located in Balboa, Republic of Panama. It will be used as part of an overall program in the training of pilots for the Panama Canal in ship handling. The simulator was purchased from Tracor Hydronautics as a result of a competitive procurement based on specifications and

  • , Thunderbolt, Ga. They are the first of a new generation of shiphandling and firefighting tugs specifically designed for work in the Panama Canal. The main feature of these tugboats is the capability of the propellers, located just forward of amidship, to be rotated 360 degrees, enabling the

  • Solidur Plastics Co., Delmont, Pa., supplied an Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) marine fender system for the locks at the Panama Canal to protect oceangoing ships from the damaging impacts of bumping into the lockwalls. Jorge Quijano, chief of the Locks Division, Panama Canal

  • British marine engineering firm introduced it. The Esperanza was built by Houma Fabricators Inc., Houma, La. The 99-foot harbor tug, owned by the Panama Canal Commission, has twin 1,500-hp General Motors EMD diesels and is rated at 90,000 pounds of foward bollard pull and 72,000 pounds of reverse bollard

  • The Panama Canal’s impact on shipping routes and vessel sizes since it opened in 1914 is undisputed. This will continue with the opening of a third channel for larger vessels in 2016. This briefing examines the risk management impact of this expansion on the maritime industry.   Why is the Panama Canal

  • program at the Academy. The scholarship he has established will perpetuate his family's longtime interest in and commitment to the welfare of the Panama Canal and the Republic of Panama

  • A group of French ship repairers led by the Port of Marseilles Authority has disclosed plans for turning the old Panama Canal Co.'s drydocks at Balboa into a modern repair facility. A few weeks ago the group, which includes Chantiers Navals de La Ciotat, received approval from the Panama Canal

  • Dravo SteelShip Corporation has announced the recent completion and delivery of nine 48-foot pilot boats for the Panama Canal Commission. The single-screw pilot launches have all been delivered to the Canal Zone under their own power. They were delivered two at a time for safety measures. The 2

  • . The two 1,300-cubic-yard barges, the first to be built by NABRICO for the Commission, will be used in the on-going dredging operations in the Panama Canal. Each is classed by the American Bureau of Shipping as an unmanned ocean service barge complete with loadline. A steel reinforced four-inch

  • Moss Point Marine, Inc., Escatawpa, Miss., has completed the all-steel, 105-foot harbor tug, Paz, to the Panama Canal Commission, Republic of Panama. Original construction was begun by another shipyard which did not complete the vessel due to inclement weather and a decision by its management to

  • , Fla., firm of Norman N. De- Jong and Associates, Inc., naval architects and marine engineers. Destined for ship-handling duties in the Panama Canal, the 105- foot "Water Tractor" is being built by Thunderbolt Marine Industries in Thunderbolt, Ga., for the Panama Canal Company. Delivery is

  • MT May-19#25  
val Surface Warfare Center, Panama  are of great interest)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 25

    . Commercial 7RZHG2(0+XOODQG3ROH0RXQWHG was awarded a contract from the Na- and scienti? c applications and trials val Surface Warfare Center, Panama are of great interest. While the core City Division, (NSWC PCD), Panama technology is ready, the many layers City, FL to demonstrate advanced

  • MR May-19#53 WORKBOATS: INSIDE THE U.S. WORKBOAT MARKET
The U.S. towing)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 53

    WORKBOATS: INSIDE THE U.S. WORKBOAT MARKET The U.S. towing and tug business is 5,500 boats, more than 31,000 barges with an estimated total impact on U.S. GDP of $33.8 billion (using 2014 data). in the Northeast, recently completed its 8,400 hp Bert Reinauer at its owned yard, Senesco, paired with a

  • MR May-19#52 , long a mainstay in the  a Panama Canal transit for its ATB)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    The movement to the West Coast saw Tjuggernaut. A 2017 study com- million internal (on the rivers and ICW), Vane Brothers, long a mainstay in the a Panama Canal transit for its ATB As- missioned jointly by the U.S. Maritime and 91 million s.t. intra-port. The busi- bunkering trades and in clean and dirty

  • MR May-19#35 GREEN MARINE • Propulsion
equipment in the ship without)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 35

    GREEN MARINE • Propulsion equipment in the ship without losing too LNG tank ? lling cannot yet be speci? ed essary engine and selected system com- trolled via control of hydraulic oil ? ow much container capacity. As Hapag- precisely. According to statements, the ponents for the conversion in order

  • MR May-19#9  West Coast ports 
in a post-Panama Canal expansion era, 
with)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 9

    losing market share to the waterfront, etc. What they are worried about is just how much freight they can win from U.S. West Coast ports in a post-Panama Canal expansion era, with their on-dock rail connections to a very fast class one railway heading east. That’s how you run a supply chain. In North

  • MN May-19#40 INLAND OPERATOR PROFILE
Kirby’s 
Secret Sauce
Credit:)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 40

    INLAND OPERATOR PROFILE Kirby’s Secret Sauce Credit: KIRBY CORP Another year; another major ? eet takeover by Kirby Corporation. But the leader of the inland tank-barge sector is not growing for growth’s sake: a deeper look at the numbers shows a disciplined strategy at work. By Greg Miller irby is de?

  • MN May-19#36 INLAND LOGISTICS
What’s Moving on 
Your Waterway?
When it)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 36

    INLAND LOGISTICS What’s Moving on Your Waterway? When it comes to inland waterways, conventional wisdom points to the usual cargoes of coal, grain and petroleum. That’s true, but any project cargo involves big lifts and even bigger issues. By Tom Ewing t last November’s WCI meeting held in Chicago, mo

  • MN May-19#16 INSIGHTS
(IRPT), a Member of the USDOT Marine Transportation)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    INSIGHTS (IRPT), a Member of the USDOT Marine Transportation, a former board member of the National Waterways Con- ference and a current member of IRPT and many other industry af? liations too numerous to list here. Today, Wilmsmeyer and his ACP sit at the heart of the U.S. inland waterways equation

  • MN May-19#6 EDITOR’S NOTE
s we fast approach midyear 2019, it is time)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 6

    EDITOR’S NOTE s we fast approach midyear 2019, it is time for our annual Inland Waterways edition. Indeed, much of the emerging news foretell better times ahead for inland operators and their customers. That reality is balanced by the fact that there is plenty left to accom- A plish, and still more in the

  • MP Q1-19#48 ......................... 28 Panama Canal  .................)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    Avenue Marine Terminal .......... 31 Wolfe, John ....................................... 46 HMM ................................................ 28 Panama Canal ............................... 8, 45 ZIM .................................................. 28 Houston, Port of .................... 26, 27

  • MP Q1-19#45  Port 
“The expansion of the Panama Canal and growth in container-)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 45

    ahead of and Ports America,” according to the port’s president. second place New Orleans in total tonnage and second place Port “The expansion of the Panama Canal and growth in container- of New York, New Jersey in terms of cargo value, according to a ized exports, namely resin and frozen poultry, have buoyed

  • MP Q1-19#35 , Hong Kong, 
Gibraltar, Panama, Houston, and LA/Long)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 35

    be available in all of the major bunkering ports, includ- ing Singapore, Fujairah, Rotterdam, Antwerp, Shanghai, Ningbo-Zhoushan, Hong Kong, Gibraltar, Panama, Houston, and LA/Long Beach. For more niche routes, vessel operators may adjust where they bunker, but it won't be a big deal.” He acknowledged some

  • MP Q1-19#34  have signi?cant im-
ARA, Panama, Seattle (on the USWC))
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 34

    should limit the de?cit that end, BP will have their new low sulfur blend available at there. For bunkers markets, these changes have signi?cant im- ARA, Panama, Seattle (on the USWC), Singapore (the world’s plications for setting up supply arrangements and for substantial largest bunkering entrepôt), Hong

  • MP Q1-19#17 , is broken.” and also one in Panama; one with automation in)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 17

    mess that piece up, then they want to automate. We have a good case study within CSX everything from that point, obviously, is broken.” and also one in Panama; one with automation in it and one be- Similar to the challenges that ship operators face when set- ing less automated than the other. But we can cover

  • MP Q1-19#8  to the 
maturation) of the Panama Canal expansion and, ?nally)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 8

    rush to import aggres- sively ahead of the threat of tariffs stemming from the U.S.-China discord, the advent (and out to the maturation) of the Panama Canal expansion and, ?nally, improved port infrastructure and authorized channel depths, especially here in the United States. All that said; yesterday’s

  • MR Apr-19#8   ously been the province of Panama and 
The Captain Emery)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    and shattering the duopoly that had previ- Rice Medal recipients were in atten- managing the best of industry under the ously been the province of Panama and The Captain Emery Rice Medal The Academy strikes the Captain Em- dance. McDonald recognized each in IRI umbrella, eventually taking the reg-

  • MR Apr-19#7  Nelson Street, Panama City, FL 32401
Email:)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 7

    NEW CONSTRUCTION • REPAIRS • CONVERSIONS 2200 Nelson Street, Panama City, FL 32401 Email: sberthold@easternshipbuilding.com www.easternshipbuilding.com TEL: 850-896-9869 Visit us at Booth #1137 May 6-8, 2019 National Harbor, MD Open For Business Visit us at Booth #607 We look forward to serving you in

  • MN Apr-19#48 COATINGS
Advanced Coatings Enhance 
Aesthetics, Durability)
    April 2019 - Marine News page: 48

    COATINGS Advanced Coatings Enhance Aesthetics, Durability and Safety As Maritime Partners LLC Coatings built out its modern ? eet of new tank barges, quality coatings and responsiveness to last-minute color changes supported that ? eet expansion. Sherwin-Williams was there to meet the challenge. By

  • MR Mar-19#41 ? c Northwest; Costa Rica & Panama and Belize. National Geographic)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 41

    ;u=oulvl$_;u;1ou7vr;-hv=oub|v;?=l built for Lindblad Expeditions for exploratory cruising in Alaska; Baja, California; the Paci? c Northwest; Costa Rica & Panama and Belize. National Geographic Venture mea- _oov;|oY?|_;?ou?7Lv?o1-?Y-]l sures 238.5 x 44 x 10-ft. and is a Jones Act coastal cruise vessel, purpose-built

  • MR Mar-19#30 CRUISE SHIPPING • THE MARKET REPORT
MARINER SKILLS 
ASSESSME)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    CRUISE SHIPPING • THE MARKET REPORT MARINER SKILLS ASSESSMENT: ‘THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT!’ Carnival Corporation part- nered with Marine Learning Systems to develop an App for mariner skills assessment. Dubbed SkillGrader, the App was designed to help standard- ize Carnival Corporation’s training and

  • MR Mar-19#20  such studies  fouling from a Panamax class container  tions)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 20

    .com The Future of Autonomous Robotic Hull Grooming hip hull biofouling has signi? - hull annually. And while such studies fouling from a Panamax class container tions, damaging to the hull coating, and cant impacts on ? eet readiness, on commercial vessels are almost non- ship would run

  • MP Q1-19#43  a statement. In 2018 Royal Ca- Panama, Costa Rica, Mexico and)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 43

    growth to expanded business ber 2019 offering an 11-night cruise to Jamaica, Colombia, opportunities, according to a statement. In 2018 Royal Ca- Panama, Costa Rica, Mexico and the Ocean Cay MSC Marine ribbean International added sailings to the Empress of the Reserve. A 10-night cruise will include

  • MR Feb-19#42  sensing devices 
Flag Panama
in excess of 26 knots)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    16 business Generators 2 x Perkins pitch propellers. It has a full load speed class seats, 16 economy seating, one temperature sensing devices Flag Panama in excess of 26 knots. lavatory, luggage shelves, two (2) PFD to meet specialized marine Class/Survey Lloyds Register (LR) Tank capacities include

  • MR Feb-19#33  Shipbuilding, in Panama City,  combination of)
    February 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 33

    being built at are based. Stena Line’s feet matches the Channel business between England and San Francisco Bay area Operators Eastern Shipbuilding, in Panama City, combination of passengers and freight France. Its runs also link Finland Lithua- Ferry operators in the San Francisco Bay Fla with a passenger