California

  • The Domino Theory was the Cold War concept that if communism obtained a foothold in a region – say Vietnam in Southeast Asia – other countries would soon fall like a perfectly aligned row of dominoes to communism (e.g., Cambodia and Laos). Whether one supports the theory or not, it has at least one strong point: it was a simple story to tell. 

     
    It feels like California has adopted its own version of the Domino Theory: if California pushes the regulatory envelope for zero emissions, other states and countries will certainly adopt similar strategies. The narrative’s importance is that it counters the argument that California is building a regulatory state that will leave it hamstrung with costs and uncompetitive in a global marketplace. 
     
    This zero-emission Domino Theory is on full display in California’s maritime industry where port authorities and regulators are working to reduce emissions from port-related activities. California port authorities have led the way in establishing themselves as global green port leaders. It is a well-earned reputation. During the past decade, ports have reduced diesel particulate matter, a pollutant of particular concern to local communities, between 76 percent to 88 percent, depending on the port complex. That reduction is no mean feat. It translates to meaningful improvements in air quality and reductions in health risk. 
     
    But part of the argument for being a green leader is that other ports will follow California’s example. The dominoes must fall at each port around the country and, when it happens, California will not stand alone. We will have started the movement. Yet, to date, no has followed California’s green leadership; the dominoes remain upright. 
     
    No port outside of California requires or incentivizes the use of shore power for cargo vessels. No port has developed a meaningful Clean Trucks Program to accelerate the turnover of drayage trucks. Those ports that do have green port programs on paper are letting time, rather than command-and-control regulation, do the heavy lifting. With time, older, more polluting equipment is replaced with modern equipment that has the latest emissions control systems. This is the same strategy that has successfully reduced emissions from passenger vehicles across the country. In addition to achieving the same emission reductions, the time approach also eliminates stranded asset costs and the need to incentivize equipment replacement saving billions.
     
    As California ports look to further burnish their environmental credentials, they face a difficult challenge. Because all available feasible, cost-effective technology has been deployed, two paths exist to further emission reductions. One is incremental through the use of near-zero technologies. In this case, incremental means achieving an additional 90 percent reduction on top of a previous 90 percent reduction in emissions standards for on-road and off-road equipment. For the mathematically challenged, that would be the equivalent of a 99 percent emissions reduction. The only hurdle to this pathway is that equipment is just now becoming commercially available and a new (California-only, of course) engine standard requiring equipment manufacturers to sell cleaner equipment is not expected until the 2023 timeframe and may only apply to on-road engines.
     
    The other pathway is a paradigm shift with a move straight to zero-emissions. This pathway’s main hurdle is that the equipment available today is fully automated and costs about $35 billion to address just cargo-handling equipment statewide. This equipment makes-up only 4 percent of port-related diesel emissions and less than 1 percent of regional diesel emissions. Or, we can place our bets on electrified versions of the existing diesel-powered equipment marine terminals currently use. It should be noted that this equipment does not currently exist and nor does any of the supporting infrastructure necessary to power it. To further complicate matters, tackling zero emission “solutions” for other port-related equipment (locomotives, drayage trucks, harbor craft and tugs) is even more challenging and more expensive. 
     
    How California ports accomplish this transition to zero-emissions while remaining both competitive and an industry leader remains unanswered.
     
    Not to be out done, California’s regulators are taking a cue from the ports and pressing for even more aggressive action. In a proposal heard by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) at the end of March, California will lay out their new vision for tackling emissions. This updated vision calls for beginning the transition to zero-emission cargo-handling equipment early, in 2026, despite the fact that no equipment capable of successfully operating in a marine terminal environment exists. 
     
    Even more disturbing, it upends the traditional approach to improving air quality. Normally, the State would require equipment manufacturers to build and sell equipment that meets an emissions performance standard. California would sometimes match that demand with a requirement that forces users to retire the oldest equipment to accelerate the introduction of the newest, cleanest equipment. This time, no proposal for tighter (or even zero) emission standards exists and there is no requirement for equipment manufacturers to sell zero emission equipment. Instead, it appears that California will give the equipment users a hearty “good luck” and the sole burden to find such equipment.
     
    California regulators have targeted the maritime industry to lead the way on zero emissions because it can. State regulators are poised to set aggressive maritime sector targets that are decades ahead of the requirements proposed for other California industrial sectors. In doing so, it shifts the costs of technology development from all California industrial sectors to the maritime sector. The maritime sector will have to bear the burden of technology development that the rest of the State will be able to rely on to meet their requirements decades later.
     
    All of this “leadership” is happening in the context of a decade-long slide in California ports’ market share – a trend that isn’t likely to end soon. Both California ports and regulators assure stakeholders that they will proceed judiciously and do not wish to harm the source of tens of thousands of jobs statewide. To that end, both port authorities and the State have repeatedly called for other jurisdictions to follow their lead to help maintain an even playing field. No one has followed. 
     
    Despite efforts by California ports and regulators to form partnerships outside of California, no dominoes have fallen elsewhere. The question to be asked, after more than a decade of California “leading” the way, is anyone willing to follow? Or, will California and its ports continue to stand alone?
     
     
    The Author
    Thomas A. Jelenić is Vice President for Pacific Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA). Mr. Jelenić works with policy makers, regulators, industry leaders and other entities to help ensure that sound science and industry issues are part of the discussion as California continues to call for the increased use of zero and near-zero emissions equipment at California’s ports and throughout the goods movement industry. Jelenić has two decades of maritime industry experience, including more than 14 years in environmental and planning positions at the Port of Long Beach, the nation’s second busiest seaport, and senior management roles in private consulting and logistics development.
     
     
    (As published in the April 2018 edition of Marine News)
  • The newly formed California Launch Service Corporation christened its first launch vessel on June 14, in ceremonies at the St. Francis Yacht Club, San Francisco, Calif. Rees B. Williams Jr., president of the firm, headquartered in San Francisco, said the company received authorization to operate as

  • The University of California at San Diego has purchased the 125- foot supply/geophysical survey vessel Midnight Alaskan from Midnight Boat Company of Berwick, La., for operation by the worldfamous Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif. The research craft will be renamed the Robert

  • .com CEO/President: Philip Cruver No. Of Employees: 6 Catalina Sea Ranch, LLC, headquartered at Terminal Island in the Port of Los Angeles, California, has secured the first permit for offshore aquaculture in U.S. Federal waters from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which was unanimously approved

  • The Trinity Marine Group has been awarded a contract to build a 183-foot diner boat for Hornblower Dining Yachts of California. The new flagship of the Hornblower fleet, largest of its type on the West Coast, will operate out of the Los Angeles Harbor beginning in the spring of 1989. While new in

  • oil to cleaner burning distillates on oceangoing craft is anything but a routine event for some vessels. But, don’t take our word for it – the State of California does a pretty good job of recordkeeping, and the numbers don’t lie.  It’s probably a good thing, then, that the U.S. Coast Guard in September published

  • Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA) revealed the maritime industry's economic impact on three West Coast states. Maritime and related industries in California generate $14.4 billion annually, $4 billion in northern California and $10.4 billion in southern California, the study found. International trade

  • sales, it was announced by J.P. Gray, president. Mr. Couch, a vice president since February 1978, will continue as Matson's area manager for southern California. Mr. Prince will continue as area manager for northern California, the position he has held since July 1980, and Mr. Kelai will continue as Hawaii

  • West Coast. That said; any marine operator – located anywhere on the globe – can glean valuable ‘take-aways’ from this video. The states of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington, and the province of British Columbia collaborated on the project with support from the Pacific States/British Columbia

  • California Dreamin': In CA, offshore wind has unlimited potentialWhen it comes to States promoting renewable, non-fossil electricity generation, California surely leads the list, from utility-scale regional grids to individual rooftop solar panels.In fact, a December 2018 update from the California Energy

  • between oil slicks applied with dispersants and those not, application of dispersants from boats, and the use of dispersants in southern California. One session will highlight the interagency dispersant decision process. In-depth case histories of oil spill cleanup efforts will detail a pipeline

  • , was the introduction of Phillip Eisenberg, national president of MTS and past president of SNAME. Mr. Eisenberg is well acquainted in southern California. He had been in town on other business and heard of the scheduled meeting. He delayed his departure long enough to put in an appearance and

  • MR Nov-19#70  collabo- has moved to sunny California where he  ing risk management)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    shipping market. joining Chevron 30 years ago, Herron a reputation can happen overnight, mak- Drawing on the company’s collabo- has moved to sunny California where he ing risk management the primary role of Raising the BMA ration with the Bahamas Maritime Au- is General Manager of Fleet Operations. Chevron

  • MR Nov-19#24  be enough. lier said that California needs a port- ing within)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 24

    huge industrial sites. Col- between an American workforce work- 2014, SUNY professor Dr. Shmuel Yah- Laissez faire may not be enough. lier said that California needs a port- ing within a largely European corporate alom published a report titled “Offshore The topic of OFW and ports and pub- by-port analysis

  • MR Nov-19#14 , it is 
York to Texas to California. applies (and the situations)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 14

    from New Obviously, this overlay of what law senger disputes but are less available in of parties from different countries, it is York to Texas to California. applies (and the situations in which it the case of injured workers. SCOTUS easier to enforce an arbitration award Additionally, the SCOTUS decision

  • MN Nov-19#95  Shipyards announced the ap- California and graduated as a me-
pointm)
    November 2019 - Marine News page: 95

    aircraft maintenance Seaspan Shipyards Announces at Northrop University in Inglewood, Management Additions Seaspan Shipyards announced the ap- California and graduated as a me- pointment of James Clarke as Chief chanical engineer. After a brief stint Financial Of? cer (CFO). With more working for

  • MP Q3-19#48 .......................... 12
California Air Resources Board)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    ............................ 36, 38 GTT .................................................. 24 Petrospot ......................................... 12 California Air Resources Board ........... 42 Halvorsen, Magnus ............................ 34 Pivotal LNG ....................................... 38 California

  • MP Q3-19#42  to EV planning that other California seaports    75,000 pounds)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 42

    emissions and an economical, demonstrated equipment loads, unloads and stacks containers weighing up to appr oach to EV planning that other California seaports 75,000 pounds onto trucks and trains. can r eplicate. The top handlers run on a one-megawatt battery designed to op- erate for up to

  • MP Q3-19#41  total grant funding from the California Energy Com-
mission)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 41

    terminal equipment to zero emissions by 2030 and on-road trucks by 2035. The Port received nearly $80 million in total grant funding from the California Energy Com- mission (CEC) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to proceed with six zero emission and advanced energy demon- stration projects

  • MP Q3-19#8  Golden State has ordered all California ports to achieve “emissions)
    Sep/Oct 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 8

    the nation’s two biggest container ports compete – and cooperate – when it comes to commerce and the environment. The Golden State has ordered all California ports to achieve “emissions free operations” by the year 2030, or in other words, right around the time that China says that their emis- sions will

  • MT Oct-19#22  Institution of Oceanog- by California Sea Grant, the National)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 22

    War II, according to a study the opportunity to resolve the trend in ? ne detail. Supported by researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanog- by California Sea Grant, the National Science Foundation, T raphy at the University of California San Diego. and private donors, the study is the latest among

  • MT Oct-19#14 . ers battling wild?  res in California, one 
sustainable energy)
    October 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 14

    $200 billion to the Green ? ooding in the Midwest, to ? re? ght- fossil fuels to energy ef? ciency and Climate Fund. ers battling wild? res in California, one sustainable energy.” Sanders claims he • Expanding the “climate justice” thing is clear: We need to take bold, di- can avert climate catastrophe

  • MR Oct-19#76  Willow Pass Road Concord, California, 
Salary: $ $48,735)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 76

    statutory and industry recom- Military Sealift Command mended rules and regulations, giving particular attention Job Location: Willow Pass Road Concord, California, Salary: $ $48,735 , Full Time , Mid Career to the ISM/ISPS/MLC codes, ? ag and class requirements 94520 Contact Category: Engineer / Naval Architect

  • MR Oct-19#27  of 1898 (and lengthy 
the California Gold Rush of the late)
    October 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 27

    acquired the defunct railroad along the way). After attraction to its ? nancial backers, was the Spanish American war of 1898 (and lengthy the California Gold Rush of the late voyages around Cape Horn for U.S. naval vessels 1840s. stationed in California), geopolitical considerations Grace Lines

  • MN Sep-19#30 , a case that originated in California which al- recognize)
    September 2019 - Marine News page: 30

    risks. ed States Supreme Court considered The Dutra Group v. However, marine employers and vessel owners must Batterton, a case that originated in California which al- recognize that the Supreme Court has af? rmed punitive lowed punitive damages. Ultimately, the United States Su- damages in situations

  • MN Oct-19#35  linking Stockton, California  cessful short sea runs)
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 35

    SHORTSEA SHIPPING service linking Stockton, California cessful short sea runs in Europe, the in our intermodal equation – deserve with the deepsea container docks at waterborne route from Norfolk into the same consideration as every other Oakland saw more than $10 million Baltimore is actually

  • MN Oct-19#16 , this will enable new  – California/Boston, or Denmark/Boston))
    October 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    on-time performance, and re- or ocean with the autonomous vessel on the other side duce operational expenses. Ultimately, this will enable new – California/Boston, or Denmark/Boston); however, in types of operations and business on water that are imprac- most current actual applications the operator

  • MN Mar-19#53  logistics. All  Southern California Regional Rail Au- board)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    appointed vice presi- ernment and regulatory affairs at the gram. He also serves as a member of the dent of Central America logistics. All Southern California Regional Rail Au- board of directors of PMSA. three report to Steve Collar, senior vice thority (Metrolink). Cohen earned a Aurichio Named Executive

  • MN Mar-19#26  garnered bipar- State of California’s efforts to regulate)
    March 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    in Washington, DC pact on interstate commerce, recently acted to preempt the are as intense as they’ve ever been, VIDA garnered bipar- State of California’s efforts to regulate meal and rest break tisan support and ultimately became law last December. rules for truck drivers, notably stating that:

  • MR Sep-19#60 ,  Willow Pass Road Concord, California, 94520
in Staten Island)
    September 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    Captain Description: Email: arubin@hroptions.com Shore-based/Full-time The Life Cycle Manager is responsible for identifying, Willow Pass Road Concord, California, 94520 in Staten Island, NY. developing, planning, resourcing, and executing major JobDescription: Support Marine Personnel Department in vessel

  • MT Jul-19#72  Ocean 
Systems 
San Diego, California
President/CEO: Bob Acks
No)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 72

    MTR 100 Remote Ocean Systems San Diego, California President/CEO: Bob Acks No. of Employees: 30+ www.rosys.com Remote Ocean Systems is an ISO 9001- 2015 certi? ed company with a 28,000 sq. ft. research and manufacturing facility dedi- Oceanology International cated to producing products that are reliable

  • MT Jul-19#44  (ROVs) from its plant in California. Deep 
Detyens Shipyards)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 44

    in harsh and diverse operating environments. Deep Ocean designs, builds and tests its remotely oper- ated vehicles (ROVs) from its plant in California. Deep Detyens Shipyards Ocean has been in operation for over 30 years and has sold more than 600 ROV systems in more than 30 coun- North Charleston

  • MT Jul-19#24  Inc., San Diego, California, manufactures preci-)
    July 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 24

    MTR 100 LinkQuest San Diego, CA President/CEO: Ning Xiao, Ph.D. www.link-quest.com LinkQuest LinkQuest Inc., San Diego, California, manufactures preci- Link Acoustic Tracking Systems provide highly robust, ac- sion acoustic instruments for offshore oil exploration, con- curate and cost-effective Ultra

  • MP Q3-19#10 . In the 1850’s during the California gold rush, the leaders)
    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 10

    . lure of private waterfront ownership and development per- The proposal has had the effect of unifying the Northern Cali- sists. In the 1850’s during the California gold rush, the leaders fornia intermodal supply chain in ? erce opposition – and for of the newly formed City of Oakland began to sell off their

  • MR Aug-19#63  a standstill  pollution at California’s Port of Long  tions)
    August 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 63

    the bat- diesel-electric powertrain to help reduce and operators can compare these solu- teries when the vessels are at a standstill pollution at California’s Port of Long tions in their speci? c applications, and Case Histories or running at low speed. When the ves- Evidence of the bene? ts of hybrid/

  • MN Aug-19#26 ; 
WI, and distributed by California-based C-Hero in the)
    August 2019 - Marine News page: 26

    ; an experienced to ISO 9001standards by Harken Industrial in Pewaukee, workforce and computerized manufacturing equipment; WI, and distributed by California-based C-Hero in the multi-disciplined engineers; and a management team laser United States. For workboat operators in domestic waters, focused