California

  • The Domino Theory was the Cold War concept that if communism obtained a foothold in a region – say Vietnam in Southeast Asia – other countries would soon fall like a perfectly aligned row of dominoes to communism (e.g., Cambodia and Laos). Whether one supports the theory or not, it has at least one strong point: it was a simple story to tell. 

     
    It feels like California has adopted its own version of the Domino Theory: if California pushes the regulatory envelope for zero emissions, other states and countries will certainly adopt similar strategies. The narrative’s importance is that it counters the argument that California is building a regulatory state that will leave it hamstrung with costs and uncompetitive in a global marketplace. 
     
    This zero-emission Domino Theory is on full display in California’s maritime industry where port authorities and regulators are working to reduce emissions from port-related activities. California port authorities have led the way in establishing themselves as global green port leaders. It is a well-earned reputation. During the past decade, ports have reduced diesel particulate matter, a pollutant of particular concern to local communities, between 76 percent to 88 percent, depending on the port complex. That reduction is no mean feat. It translates to meaningful improvements in air quality and reductions in health risk. 
     
    But part of the argument for being a green leader is that other ports will follow California’s example. The dominoes must fall at each port around the country and, when it happens, California will not stand alone. We will have started the movement. Yet, to date, no has followed California’s green leadership; the dominoes remain upright. 
     
    No port outside of California requires or incentivizes the use of shore power for cargo vessels. No port has developed a meaningful Clean Trucks Program to accelerate the turnover of drayage trucks. Those ports that do have green port programs on paper are letting time, rather than command-and-control regulation, do the heavy lifting. With time, older, more polluting equipment is replaced with modern equipment that has the latest emissions control systems. This is the same strategy that has successfully reduced emissions from passenger vehicles across the country. In addition to achieving the same emission reductions, the time approach also eliminates stranded asset costs and the need to incentivize equipment replacement saving billions.
     
    As California ports look to further burnish their environmental credentials, they face a difficult challenge. Because all available feasible, cost-effective technology has been deployed, two paths exist to further emission reductions. One is incremental through the use of near-zero technologies. In this case, incremental means achieving an additional 90 percent reduction on top of a previous 90 percent reduction in emissions standards for on-road and off-road equipment. For the mathematically challenged, that would be the equivalent of a 99 percent emissions reduction. The only hurdle to this pathway is that equipment is just now becoming commercially available and a new (California-only, of course) engine standard requiring equipment manufacturers to sell cleaner equipment is not expected until the 2023 timeframe and may only apply to on-road engines.
     
    The other pathway is a paradigm shift with a move straight to zero-emissions. This pathway’s main hurdle is that the equipment available today is fully automated and costs about $35 billion to address just cargo-handling equipment statewide. This equipment makes-up only 4 percent of port-related diesel emissions and less than 1 percent of regional diesel emissions. Or, we can place our bets on electrified versions of the existing diesel-powered equipment marine terminals currently use. It should be noted that this equipment does not currently exist and nor does any of the supporting infrastructure necessary to power it. To further complicate matters, tackling zero emission “solutions” for other port-related equipment (locomotives, drayage trucks, harbor craft and tugs) is even more challenging and more expensive. 
     
    How California ports accomplish this transition to zero-emissions while remaining both competitive and an industry leader remains unanswered.
     
    Not to be out done, California’s regulators are taking a cue from the ports and pressing for even more aggressive action. In a proposal heard by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) at the end of March, California will lay out their new vision for tackling emissions. This updated vision calls for beginning the transition to zero-emission cargo-handling equipment early, in 2026, despite the fact that no equipment capable of successfully operating in a marine terminal environment exists. 
     
    Even more disturbing, it upends the traditional approach to improving air quality. Normally, the State would require equipment manufacturers to build and sell equipment that meets an emissions performance standard. California would sometimes match that demand with a requirement that forces users to retire the oldest equipment to accelerate the introduction of the newest, cleanest equipment. This time, no proposal for tighter (or even zero) emission standards exists and there is no requirement for equipment manufacturers to sell zero emission equipment. Instead, it appears that California will give the equipment users a hearty “good luck” and the sole burden to find such equipment.
     
    California regulators have targeted the maritime industry to lead the way on zero emissions because it can. State regulators are poised to set aggressive maritime sector targets that are decades ahead of the requirements proposed for other California industrial sectors. In doing so, it shifts the costs of technology development from all California industrial sectors to the maritime sector. The maritime sector will have to bear the burden of technology development that the rest of the State will be able to rely on to meet their requirements decades later.
     
    All of this “leadership” is happening in the context of a decade-long slide in California ports’ market share – a trend that isn’t likely to end soon. Both California ports and regulators assure stakeholders that they will proceed judiciously and do not wish to harm the source of tens of thousands of jobs statewide. To that end, both port authorities and the State have repeatedly called for other jurisdictions to follow their lead to help maintain an even playing field. No one has followed. 
     
    Despite efforts by California ports and regulators to form partnerships outside of California, no dominoes have fallen elsewhere. The question to be asked, after more than a decade of California “leading” the way, is anyone willing to follow? Or, will California and its ports continue to stand alone?
     
     
    The Author
    Thomas A. Jelenić is Vice President for Pacific Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA). Mr. Jelenić works with policy makers, regulators, industry leaders and other entities to help ensure that sound science and industry issues are part of the discussion as California continues to call for the increased use of zero and near-zero emissions equipment at California’s ports and throughout the goods movement industry. Jelenić has two decades of maritime industry experience, including more than 14 years in environmental and planning positions at the Port of Long Beach, the nation’s second busiest seaport, and senior management roles in private consulting and logistics development.
     
     
    (As published in the April 2018 edition of Marine News)
  • The newly formed California Launch Service Corporation christened its first launch vessel on June 14, in ceremonies at the St. Francis Yacht Club, San Francisco, Calif. Rees B. Williams Jr., president of the firm, headquartered in San Francisco, said the company received authorization to operate as

  • The University of California at San Diego has purchased the 125- foot supply/geophysical survey vessel Midnight Alaskan from Midnight Boat Company of Berwick, La., for operation by the worldfamous Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif. The research craft will be renamed the Robert

  • .com CEO/President: Philip Cruver No. Of Employees: 6 Catalina Sea Ranch, LLC, headquartered at Terminal Island in the Port of Los Angeles, California, has secured the first permit for offshore aquaculture in U.S. Federal waters from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which was unanimously approved

  • The Trinity Marine Group has been awarded a contract to build a 183-foot diner boat for Hornblower Dining Yachts of California. The new flagship of the Hornblower fleet, largest of its type on the West Coast, will operate out of the Los Angeles Harbor beginning in the spring of 1989. While new in

  • oil to cleaner burning distillates on oceangoing craft is anything but a routine event for some vessels. But, don’t take our word for it – the State of California does a pretty good job of recordkeeping, and the numbers don’t lie.  It’s probably a good thing, then, that the U.S. Coast Guard in September published

  • Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA) revealed the maritime industry's economic impact on three West Coast states. Maritime and related industries in California generate $14.4 billion annually, $4 billion in northern California and $10.4 billion in southern California, the study found. International trade

  • sales, it was announced by J.P. Gray, president. Mr. Couch, a vice president since February 1978, will continue as Matson's area manager for southern California. Mr. Prince will continue as area manager for northern California, the position he has held since July 1980, and Mr. Kelai will continue as Hawaii

  • West Coast. That said; any marine operator – located anywhere on the globe – can glean valuable ‘take-aways’ from this video. The states of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington, and the province of British Columbia collaborated on the project with support from the Pacific States/British Columbia

  • California Dreamin': In CA, offshore wind has unlimited potentialWhen it comes to States promoting renewable, non-fossil electricity generation, California surely leads the list, from utility-scale regional grids to individual rooftop solar panels.In fact, a December 2018 update from the California Energy

  • between oil slicks applied with dispersants and those not, application of dispersants from boats, and the use of dispersants in southern California. One session will highlight the interagency dispersant decision process. In-depth case histories of oil spill cleanup efforts will detail a pipeline

  • , was the introduction of Phillip Eisenberg, national president of MTS and past president of SNAME. Mr. Eisenberg is well acquainted in southern California. He had been in town on other business and heard of the scheduled meeting. He delayed his departure long enough to put in an appearance and

  • MT Apr-19#53  the US coasts along Northern California, Oregon 
 control of)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 53

    system measure the Alaskan Subduction Zone. The subduction zones • Iridium RUDICS communication channel for are offshore the US coasts along Northern California, Oregon control of data collection and of? oad of data and Washington State and another along Alaska and the Aleu- Operationally, the Wave Gliders

  • MT Apr-19#52  - Univer-
sity of California - San Diego in La Jolla)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 52

    costs, schedule limi- tations and inability to conduct adaptive sampling. The two customers are Scripps Institution of Oceanography - Univer- sity of California - San Diego in La Jolla, Calif. and The Cen- ter for Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Cefas, in the U.K. Scripps Institution of Oceanography-University

  • MT Apr-19#47  White Papers:  
Southern California Cluster
Spotlight 
Oceanograp)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 47

    Annual Oceanographic Instrumentation: Measurement, Process & Analysis Subsea Defense Ocean Business 2019 Technology MTR White Papers: Southern California Cluster Spotlight Oceanographic Autonomous Navigation GNSS MEMS Fiber Optic Cables, Connectors & Unmanned Vehicle Propulsion White Paper Electronic

  • MT Apr-19#23  National Oceanic and 
“In California, Washington and parts)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 23

    were Simon Fraser Uni- cleaner, munching on everything in its versity, Stanford University, Hakai path. Institute and the National Oceanic and “In California, Washington and parts Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). UNDERWATER DRONES of British Columbia, sun? ower sea Between 2006 and 2017, scientists

  • MT Apr-19#22  
sity and the University of California,  multiple sea star)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 22

    that cording to research by Cornell Univer- has brought about massive mortality in tolerate the pathogen better may spread sity and the University of California, multiple sea star species from Mexico it to the sun? ower star,” he said. Davis, in Science Advances. to Alaska. The East Coast has not been

  • MT Apr-19#11  in Washington, DC and California, which are 
without)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 11

    . • Remember that help is available. BIS has counseling Foreign buyers are not allowed to resell a controlled item desks, located in Washington, DC and California, which are without prior authorization, so protect your company by ? ll- staffed Monday through Friday during business hours by BIS ing out the

  • MT May-19#62  White Papers:  
Southern California Cluster
Spotlight 
Oceanograp)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 62

    Annual Oceanographic Instrumentation: Measurement, Process & Analysis Subsea Defense Ocean Business 2019 Technology MTR White Papers: Southern California Cluster Spotlight Oceanographic Autonomous Navigation GNSS MEMS Fiber Optic Cables, Connectors & Unmanned Vehicle Propulsion White Paper Electronic

  • MT May-19#17  understanding of the Gulf of California system. This 
for viruses)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 17

    are synthesized, scientists will generate a more were performed, including a high throughput water ? ltration complete understanding of the Gulf of California system. This for viruses that allowed the team to reduce processing bias. understanding will be applicable to oceanic environments From super-hot

  • MT May-19#14  2,000m depth in the Gulf of California  create the illusion)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 14

    Falkor discovered and explored a hydrother- across. These towers featured numerous volcanic ? anges that mal ? eld at 2,000m depth in the Gulf of California create the illusion of looking at a mirror when observing the Swhere towering mineral structures serve as biologi- superheated (366ºC) hydrothermal

  • MT May-19#2  2,000m depth 
in the Gulf of California.
Comms
20  Sound Off
Inside)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 2

    Views Scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel Falkor discovered and explored a hydrothermal ? eld at 2,000m depth in the Gulf of California. Comms 20 Sound Off Inside Dolphin, enabling technology for acoustic systems. By Justin Manley, Just Innovation, Michael Murphree & Greg Folts

  • MR May-19#79 . With ballast operations in California, 
this vessel encountered)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 79

    . ? ag, Jones Act bulk way to increased reliability for the ship’s crew.” carrier with a route from Hawaii to San Francisco. With ballast operations in California, this vessel encountered some of the strictest regulations in the world. For 13 years this Conclusion ship ran ballast operations using the original

  • MR May-19#68   port. We’ve seen this in California, 
requirement can be)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 68

    to shut down their engines in the minimum holding time “Existing clean power solutions with fuel cells, and heavy fuel oil port. We’ve seen this in California, requirement can be reduced are focused on reducing emissions. (HFO) with hydrogen. for example, and China has intro- Eliminating emissions altogether

  • MR May-19#52 , Articulated Tug  ATBs in California ports. 
31,000 barges)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    transfers with one of the new with 5,500 boats and more than of 873 million short tons (s.t.), which in- Along the coasts, Articulated Tug ATBs in California ports. 31,000 barges, is an economic cludes 164 million s.t. coastwise, 535 s.t. Barges (ATBs) continue to gather share. The movement to the

  • MR May-19#18  North America.
Left: 
The California offshore 90-m height)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    M MARKET: OFFSHORE WIND Above: lla Weinstein, CEO, Castle Wind, a joint venture with EnBW North America. Left: The California offshore 90-m height wind map and wind resource potential estimates are provided. Areas with annual average wind speeds of 7 m/s and greater at 90-m height are generally considered

  • MR May-19#16  state 
and federal levels. 
California Dreamin’
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    for the past two years. He has extensive experience working on legislative and public policy issues, both at the state and federal levels. California Dreamin’ IN CALIFORNIA, OFFSHORE WIND HAS UNLIMITED POTENTIAL hen it comes to states about 1.5 times the state’s electric en- project in the Humboldt

  • MR May-19#8  it  the Port of Long Beach, California and  freight movement)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    Facility at way Program is dedicated to expanding – New Orleans Shuttle on the M-55 that immediately follows or precedes it the Port of Long Beach, California and freight movement on the water and this was awarded $3,155,622. This project, the supply chain. the Calcasieu Ship Channel project at round

  • MN May-19#56  to continuing to stave off  California Maritime Academy.  )
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 56

    , many accomplishments from 2018. BS in Marine Transportation from the in part, “Steve was always willing to “In addition to continuing to stave off California Maritime Academy. share his experience with his Western Jones Act repeal efforts, we completed Hemisphere port colleagues. He was a 15-year

  • MP Q1-19#48 .......................... 20
California State Supreme Court)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    .... 44 Buchmann, Alexander .............. 8, 21, 23 International Transportation Services .. 46 Rolls-Royce ....................................... 20 California State Supreme Court .......... 15 Jacksonville, Port of .......................... 28 Rucker, Thomas .................... 16, 17, 18 Campo, Ric

  • MP Q1-19#15  and legal threats. The California State Supreme 
down)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 15

    across the US has come under increasing can help drivers address possible equipment issues before a break- public scrutiny and legal threats. The California State Supreme down happens on the road. With ELD’s closely tracking time and Court ruled that any independent contractor must be able to pass movements

  • MR Apr-19#26  tial ?  agship project for California.
Offshore Wind installations)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    poten- lot about the evolution of Floating to-? eld semi-submersible ? oater with to go commercial – and need to plan ac- tial ? agship project for California. Offshore Wind installations. From major repairs at quay side, due to the cordingly. And we are supporting the learning in Aker Solutions perspective

  • MN Apr-19#34  forward for this growing California shipyard. Equally impressive)
    April 2019 - Marine News page: 34

    in Your Workboat ? Moose Boats rises to the challenge of building its biggest vessel ever. That’s an important step forward for this growing California shipyard. Equally impressive is what’s inside that rapidly developing hull and why those features were chosen. By Joseph Keefe he U.S. boatbuilding

  • MN Apr-19#2  for this growing 
ATB REVIEW
California shipyard. Equally impressive)
    April 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    Your Workboat? Moose Boats rises to the challenge of building its biggest ves- sel ever. That’s an important step forward for this growing ATB REVIEW California shipyard. Equally impressive is what’s inside that rapidly developing hull and why those features were chosen. 44 The Enduring, Iconic

  • MR Mar-19#60  Willow Pass Road Concord, California,  Company. PCS also)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 60

    Corporate / Senior Management and commercial vessels for Schuyler Line Navigation Work Phone : 757-341-4610 Job Location: Willow Pass Road Concord, California, Company. PCS also provides crewmembers for vessels 6353 Center Drive, Building #8, Suite 202 Norfolk, VA, 94520 operated by Kwajalein Range Services

  • MR Mar-19#50  platform for the  Baja California. Paci?  c North West)
    March 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 50

    its next season in expedition cruisers have especially high Transpetrol has a need for always-avail- new secure and scalable platform for the Baja California. Paci? c North West coast expectations for connectivity, which is able data and voice communication for optimized transfer and synchronization