Connecticut

  • 2019 brings new missions, strategies and new optimism for this three-port Northeast gateway.

    The Connecticut Port Authority began operations in 2016. The quasi-public agency’s mission is to grow Connecticut’s economy and create jobs by strategically investing in the state’s three deepwater ports and small harbors. In a nutshell, the Connecticut legislature teamed up with the governor to create the Connecticut Port Authority by statute in 2014.

    When it fully stood up, CPA’s first full time employee was none other than Evan Matthews, CPA’s Executive Director. He got right to work. Matthews explained, “We’re working on our third operating budget. And we’ve gone from about $400 thousand in state appropriations, and today, we have close to a $1.6 million dollar budget and five employees.”

    There’s no previous model for what Matthews and his colleagues are trying to stand up. “We have an interesting mandate – we are to promote the maritime sector focusing on the shipping activities in three deep water port complexes in Bridgeport, New Haven, and New London. They’re all slightly different,” he said.

    SHIPP: Funding the Mission
    Coordinating the development of Connecticut's ports and harbors, while working with other state, local and private entities to maximize the economic potential of maritime commerce, CPA created SHIPP as a central part of its strategy to support development throughout Connecticut’s waterfront communities.

    Through a separate mandate from the legislature to invest in small harbors throughout the state, last year CPA did its first round of Small Harbor Improvement Projects (SHIPP). A SHIPP Grant may be used on a wide range of improvements including: marina repair, dredging, boat ramp facilities improvement, breakwaters, harbor management plans and feasibility studies. The goal is simple: to strengthen the long term growth of Connecticut's maritime economy. Locally, the Connecticut Legislature likes the SHIPP projects because they’re a good way for them to connect with their constituents through these projects.

    “We had 18 different projects and invested about $4 million and that funding was provided by the State of Connecticut,” Matthews explains further, adding, “We partnered with municipalities on small projects like boat ramps, visitors docks, small dredging projects, and we’ve funded some harbor management plans. It’s a wide range of activities that we support. And we also license and administer the Connecticut State Pilots.”

    Fair Winds Propel New London’s Infrastructure
    In May, the Connecticut Port Authority, Gateway Terminal, Eversource and Ørsted announced a partnership to revitalize State Pier and establish New London as a major northeast center for the growing offshore wind industry. The estimated $93 million investment promises to transform State Pier into a state-of-the-art facility, while creating a platform for heavy lift cargo, such as offshore wind components. The wind component is especially important.

    The two-phased redevelopment plan involves a three-year planned upgrade of the facility’s infrastructure to meet the heavy lift requirements of Bay State Wind’s offshore wind components. The plan is for Bay State Wind to enter into a 10-year lease agreement granting the joint venture between Eversource and Ørsted exclusive use of State Pier for assembly and deployment of offshore wind components. Gateway Terminals, originally of New Haven, CT, signed a long-term concession agreement in January and will act as the new terminal operator.

    Evan Matthews is confident that the deal with come together successfully. In this case, he’s got logistics on his side. “New London is one of the only ports on the eastern coast that doesn’t have any overhead bridge restrictions. This will allow the inshore building of wind turbines in shore, promptly loading onto an installation vessel, and then bringing it out to the foundation. Both ports in Narragansett Bay and the New York ports have airdraft restrictions.”

    Notably, the newest public-private partnership in the Constitution State includes investment bankers Seabury Maritime. At its heart, the latest investment is designed to position Connecticut as a leader in the offshore wind industry and expand economic opportunity throughout the region. The Connecticut Port Authority will oversee the project, with construction beginning in January 2020 and anticipated for completion in March 2022.

    Dredging: Digging Deep for the Future
    For Connecticut’s ports – more so than most others along America’s 95,000 miles for coastline – dredging operations will be the key to future success. Today, the controlling depths in the state’s three big ports just aren’t deep enough. New London stands at 36 feet; New Haven about 38 feet, and Bridgeport – authorized to 35 feet – currently stands at just 28 feet.

    Currently, the only plan in place involves the deepening of the port of New Haven. A U.S. Army Corps of Engineer (USACE) study is now complete, and the hope is to deepen the New Haven channel to 40 feet.

    “It should go into design as soon as we authorize the funding to do that. The State’s portion is probably about 26 million – it’s about a 74 million dollar project in total. We would hope to get that (into a bill) as soon as we get the chief’s report and everything is authorized to go,” said Matthews.
    Although CPA works closely with USACE Engineers to manage federal navigation projects, their relationship with local ports is unlike most other typically US ports. Matthews explains, “Although we’re not in charge of any of the deepwater ports, each of the deep water port cities has its own port authority. So we work in various ways with those smaller port authorities to support their activities through sharing costs of marketing and membership dues and that sort of thing.”

    Matthews continues, “Each city has its own port authority. So we’ve got a different relationship with each one of them. But, because we were given our sole asset that we have, and our only source of revenue is the State Pier in New London. Our relationship with the New London city and the port authority is closer than it is in Bridgeport.”

    Matthews is pragmatic about what CPA can accomplish, and what it cannot. In terms of Bridgeport, he said, “We’re not trying to take them over; we’re trying to leverage and support their mission with the funding sources that we have. The biggest benefit that we have as a state agency is that we have the ability to request capital dollars in the governor’s budget. We also have the ability to go before the State Bond Commission and request bond funding that’s been authorized by the legislature.”

    In Bridgeport, CPA is trying to help them dredge to 35 feet; the authorized depth. “We’re working on that to get more ship traffic in. Most of Bridgeport’s traffic today involves domestic barge petroleum products or aggregate. That’s all US flag tug and barge stuff so they don’t really need a deep channel. There’s also a ferry operation there, as well,” adds Matthews.

    The Way Forward: A Maritime Strategy Document
    CPA doesn’t operate in a vacuum. In fact, CPA is mandated by state law to produce a Maritime Strategy Document. The latest iteration took nine months and a thorough strategic planning process to produce. The document pinpoints eight objectives that will drive and guide CPS’s future investment strategy. These include:

    • Manage the State Pier, Increase Utilization
    • Build More Volume in Connecticut State ports
    • Support Dredging of Connecticut’s Ports & Waterways
    • Support the Small Harbor Improvement Projects Program (SHIPP)
    • Create Intermodal Options
    • Leverage Emerging Opportunities
    • Enhance Ferry Systems and Enhance Cruise Coordination Activities
    • Ensure Future Support of CPA


    Building volume in the state’s commercial ports involves a three-port strategy. Like Seattle and Tacoma in the Pacific Northwest, Connecticut has realized that three niche ports can’t survive if they are competing against one another. “I think one of the things in the past is Connecticut struggled about getting a coherent message out there that it is one network – it’s one gateway that’s got three different ports. If we had Bridgeport competing with New Haven they’d never get that holistic, unified vision.”

    Key Cargoes Driving CPA Growth

    Domestic: The deepwater ports of Bridgeport, New Haven, and New London handle shipments of commodities domestically, or the movement of goods within the United States, and this trade is much larger by volume than the foreign traffic through the ports. Together with Stamford Harbor, the deepwater ports handled over 9.2 million tons of domestic commodities in 2016, or three times more than the foreign trade through the three deepwater ports. In 2016, much of the domestic traffic through Connecticut’s ports was gasoline, kerosene, and fuel oils, followed by sand and gravel as well as iron and steel scrap.

    Import/Export: In 2017, over 2.5 million tons of imports and 247,000 tons of exports moved through Connecticut’s three deepwater ports. The value of these commodities was over $1.1 billion. Imports and exports through Connecticut’s deepwater ports are largely of bulk and break-bulk commodities, with iron and steel, petroleum products, and salt and related products comprising the largest categories. Most of the international trade through Connecticut’s deepwater ports was through the Port of New Haven, with this port handling 87% of imports by volume and almost all exports by volume in 2017. Imports included petroleum products, such as home heating oil, gasoline, kerosene, diesel, and jet fuels along with salt, steel, and other products. New London handled 11% of imports by volume in 2017, and Bridgeport handled the remainder.

    In terms of passenger vessels, Matthews knows the state has work to do. Much of the traffic going in and out of Newport and New York is simply sailing by without stopping. He insists, “If we have the proper facilities, we could entice them to stop for a night, as well as an alternate to Newport, or another New England port on their way up to Canada or wherever their ultimate destination is.”

    On the intermodal front, without a true container port or container facility, Connecticut shippers are forced to truck their containers to an intermodal yard, typically in Massachusetts or New York. The solution will ultimately involve shortsea container-on-barge operations. In advance of that, conventional wisdom says that a fully functioning intermodal would need to first be in place.

    In Connecticut, the fledgling CPA is moving forward, in ways never before contemplated. “It’s kind of a unique approach. It’s a work in progress, so to speak,” says Matthews, who also knows that CPA’s success will ultimately be defined by financial independence. “We’re working to create an asset base that produces revenues to support the functions of that organization without having a need to go to state legislature for a direct appropriation.” So far; so good.


  • an alternative transportation platform coupled with a vertical integration of retail space and support of the organic farm market located along the Connecticut/Long Island Gold Coast and Hudson River area. The U.S. Maritime Administration has designated these two Marine Highways as M295 and M87. Both are

  • fall meeting at the Coast Guard Academy. The technical session of the meeting was a distinguished panel convened to discuss the topic "Southeastern Connecticut's Stake in the Development of Offshore Resources." The speakers included: Joseph A.Cope, manager of Policy Development and Economics of the

  • "Gears and Gear Units" is the title of a new 16-page brochure published by Farrel Connecticut Division, Emhart Machinery Group. The publication describes types of gearing produced by the company, including industrial, marine, high-velocity, and special gearing. Single-helical, doublehelical, spur

  • Intermarine Electronics recently held a meeting at its headquarters at St. James, N.Y., for its dealers from New York, Connecticut and New Jersey. The occasion marked the introduction of the company's new marine radar, the "Intermarine 705," which was demonstrated in operation at nearby Stony Brook

  • again serve as host to a conference and exhibition that arguably attracts the highest concentration of quality attendees of any North American show. Connecticut Maritime Association's Annual Trade Show and Conference — Shipping 2002 — is set for March 18-20, 2002. Shipping 2002 is set to break all of

  • class student, and funds have also been made available from the Foundation to the Webb Institute, New York Maritime College, and the University of Connecticut in order to assist selected students in the pursuit of their studies

  • Region of Crowley's Caribbean Division encompassing eastern and central New York, eastern Pennsylvania and Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Vermont, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Maine, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. Dennis Derby is regional marketing manager in the Northeast, with

  • Crowley's Northeast region, which encompasses eastern and central New York, eastern Pennsylvania, Maryland, Rhode Island, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Vermont, Massachusetts, Delaware, Maine, and Washington, D.C. He brings to Crowley over 10 years' experience in the common carrier motor transportati

  • navies. Work on the new order will be performed at the company's Queens, N.Y., plant. EDO Corporation, through its divisions and subsidiaries in Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Kansas, Texas, and Utah, produces a broad array of sophisticated systems, devices and materials that play a significant

  • services for system startup were provided by the MMC. All ongoing support for the PMS system will be handled by MMS technical staff in Stamford, Connecticut. MMS is a leader in providing computerized management information systems for the shipping industry. The PMS system for the QE2 is part of MMS'

  • The American Bureau of Shipping issued a Certificate of Approval to Turbine Components Corporation of Branford, Connecticut, on June 17, 1987. A.B.S. has surveyed T.C.C.'s facility and reviewed the process, specifications, and quality assurance program for the application of a unique ceramic thermal

  • MP Q3-19#48   Please visit us online
17 Connecticut Port Authority    www)
    Jul/Aug 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    Website Phone# 9 AP Companies Global Solutions LTD www.ap-companies.com +34 931 702 286 C2 Arconas www.arconas.com Please visit us online 17 Connecticut Port Authority www.CTPortAuthority.com (860) 577-5174 37 CPE Certi? ed Port Executive www.certi? edportexecutive.com (902) 425-3980 3 Elme

  • MN Aug-19#82  company in the  boat for Connecticut’s East Shore District)
    August 2019 - Marine News page: 82

    commuter The Company: ferry and the world’s ? rst solar-electric sewage pump-out Torqeedo is a pioneering technology company in the boat for Connecticut’s East Shore District Health Depart- design, development and deployment of electromobility ment. www.torqeedo.com The Case: VANE BROTHERS While

  • MN Aug-19#30  Long Island with southern Connecticut 
ny set on changing)
    August 2019 - Marine News page: 30

    million went to Harbor Harvest and its newly launched built for Harbor Harvest, a Norwalk, CT, based compa- service linking Long Island with southern Connecticut ny set on changing the way fresh produce and foods are (circumventing the worsening I-95 and I-495 snarl in the transported around metro areas

  • MP Q2-19#48 ......................... 35
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    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 48

    Coastal Barge ..................... 17 MarTID ........................... 38, 39, 40, 41 Tacoma, Port of ................................ 35 Connecticut Port Authority..16, 32, 33, 34, Matthews, Evan ............... 32, 33, 34, 35 Tyco ................................................. 30 ...

  • MP Q2-19#33  provided by the State of Connecticut,” Mat- Evan Matthews)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 33

    PORT DEVELOPMENT the future is now and that funding was provided by the State of Connecticut,” Mat- Evan Matthews is con?dent that the deal with come together suc- thews explains further, adding, “We partnered with municipalities cessfully. In this case, he’s got logistics on his side. “New London on

  • MP Q2-19#32 PORT DEVELOPMENT
Connecticut 
Port Authority: 
(*))
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 32

    PORT DEVELOPMENT Connecticut Port Authority: (*) all images courtesy CPA 2019 brings new missions, strategies and new optimism for this three-port Northeast gateway. By Joseph Keefe he Connecticut Port Authority began operations in 2016. SHIPP: Funding the Mission The quasi-public agency’s mission is to

  • MP Q2-19#16  and 2021, and in early  a Connecticut Port Authority board)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    could make more on its feet, at no small cost. Maritime consultant Donald Frost, AMH awards in late 2019, twice in 2020 and 2021, and in early a Connecticut Port Authority board member, weighed in on the 2022. But Marad is not the only funding source; short sea ser- dif?culties which face shortsea startups

  • MP Q2-19#15  Long Island with southern Connecticut (circum-
The DOT’s)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 15

    , went to Harbor Harvest, a newly launched Americas Marine Highway program, is ?nally gaining traction. service linking Long Island with southern Connecticut (circum- The DOT’s initial justi?cation for shortsea shipping was to re- venting the worsening I-95 and I-495 snarl in the NYC metro area. duce

  • MP Q2-19#6 .    
By Edward Lundquist
32 Connecticut Port Authority: the)
    May/Jun 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 6

    Yokosuka Supports Navy Ships and Crews. Understanding how that happens can bene?t commercial stakeholders, as well. By Edward Lundquist 32 Connecticut Port Authority: the future is now 2019 brings new missions, strategies and new optimism for this three-port Northeast gateway. By Joseph Keefe 36

  • MR Jun-19#16  also worked with the Connecticut Port 
ture Partners)
    June 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 16

    Eversource Ørsted, Equinor, Copenhagen Infrastruc- Massachusetts legislature has created year extension of an Incidental Harass- also worked with the Connecticut Port ture Partners, and Avangrid Renewables a goal of 3,200 MW of OSW by 2035. ment Authorization (IHA) to Vineyard Authority to commit $225M

  • MR May-19#79  factory in North Haven, Connecticut USA.
he ability of)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 79

    , Ecochlor Electrical engineer performs FAT on the Ecochlor treatment system generators at the new ProFlow manufacturing factory in North Haven, Connecticut USA. he ability of Ballast Water Management Systems (BWMSs) to operate reliably Reliability is a Growing Concern with Shipowner/Operators over

  • MR May-19#57  tug agreements as 
southern Connecticut and active on the East)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    more activ- ports receiving the grants. later in 2019. In early 2019, Moran Towing, based in ity and interest in terminal tug agreements as southern Connecticut and active on the East and Gulf midstream/downstream players are attempt- coasts, announced that it had ordered a design contract ing to build

  • MR May-19#8  of  also sponsored by the Connecticut Port 
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    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    , the project, ago – that a Marad staffer con? ded nomic bene? ts of more than $640 mil- Norman Anderson, CEO & Chairman of also sponsored by the Connecticut Port Iin me about a U.S. DOT meeting lion. Operation and maintenance costs CG/LA Infrastructure, says, “Following Authority, involves the development

  • MN May-19#37  are not driving on the 
Connecticut Turnpike, crawling)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 37

    consider a variation - “civilian truck barg- es?” Think how many tons of NOx, SOx and VOCs are NOT emitted because these trucks are not driving on the Connecticut Turnpike, crawling along at 22 mph. Recall Connecticut Port Authority’s ideas for a maritime highway parallel to I-95. Here you can see such a

  • MT Mar-19#6 , Maritime Reporter & 
a Connecticut communications ? rm)
    March 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 6

    robotics and wave energy. Wave Media titles, including Marine Guard Auxiliary for 12 years, and owns Technology Reporter, Maritime Reporter & a Connecticut communications ? rm, Engineering News and Offshore Engineer. Mulligan CaseyInk, LLC. Tom Mulligan is MTR’s science and tech- nology writer based

  • MP Q1-19#28  
the Pacifc Northwest. This Connecticut based operator’s Amer-)
    Jan/Feb 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 28

    the Mississippi River and its tributaries, New England and one of the new mega-ships. And, the ultimate impact of this the Pacifc Northwest. This Connecticut based operator’s Amer- aspect of cruise travel has yet to be fully realized. ican Song was delivered in late 2018, with its American Har- mony due

  • MN Feb-19#57  sustained our armed forces  Connecticut Maritime Association)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 57

    sys- the United States, to Merchant Mari- Third Wave Films. Endorsed by the tem at the multiuse Lovejoy Wharf ners who sustained our armed forces Connecticut Maritime Association, property. The project’s accelerated during World War II. “The Merchant and the Marine Industry Foundation, schedule called

  • MN Feb-19#53  George  been named as the Connecticut Mari-
J. Fowler, III)
    February 2019 - Marine News page: 53

    and attorneys from maritime law frm CEO & President of Dorian LPG has aquatic biology. Fowler Rodriguez, including George been named as the Connecticut Mari- J. Fowler, III, have joined the frm’s time Association (CMA) Commodore EBDG Opens East Coast Offce New Orleans, Miami, and Houston for

  • MR Jan-19#15  for 12 years, and 
owns a Connecticut communications ? rm)
    January 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 15

    . She has won 45 national and regional awards for journalism. She has been a staff of? cer for the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary for 12 years, and owns a Connecticut communications ? rm, CaseyInk, LLC. he U.S. Coast Guard’s mission costs,” said Wyman. He explained that and number of spacecraft involved,

  • MN Jan-19#16  from the University of Connecticut, and in 2006,  water)
    January 2019 - Marine News page: 16

    of the he was awarded a Master’s Degree in Public Administra- world’s untapped, natural gas up there. It’s not real deep tion from the University of Connecticut, and in 2006, water up there, a couple hundred feet or less where you completed a one year National Security Fellowship at Har- can extract some

  • MP Q4-18#54 .com  (203) 406-0109
15  Connecticut Port Authority    )
    Nov/Dec 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 54

    us online 7 Canaveral Port Authority www.portcanaveral.com Visit our website 27 CMA Shipping 2019 www.cmashipping2018.com (203) 406-0109 15 Connecticut Port Authority www.CTPortAuthority.com (860) 577-5174 45 Geor gia Ports Authority www.gaports.com Please visit us online 39 Howden

  • MR Dec-18#52  area (Southern Maine to the Connecticut  signed courses in)
    December 2018 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 52

    powered Tug. Job is for 3+months working in the Transportation Department. The incumbent will be as- 02532 USA New England area (Southern Maine to the Connecticut signed courses in vessel operations, management and Contact Shoreline). May lead to year round position for the right maritime regulation as

  • MP Q3-18#64 .com  Visit our website
9  Connecticut Port Authority    www)
    Sep/Oct 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 64

    Website Phone# 19 Arconas www.arconas.com Please visit us online 7 Canaveral Port Authority www.portcanaveral.com Visit our website 9 Connecticut Port Authority www.CTPortAuthority.com (860) 577-5174 35 CPE Certifed Port Executive www.certifedportexecutive.com (902) 425-3980 45 Geor

  • MP Q3-18#44  an estimated 
For Kunkel, Connecticut’s moves are timely)
    Sep/Oct 2018 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 44

    prediction a few years ago that boaters who might need a marina. freight shipments between 2010 and 2040 will grow to an estimated For Kunkel, Connecticut’s moves are timely. “Places are look- $39.5 trillion annually, with $10.3 trillion transported intermodally. ing for this kind of service,” he said