Greg Trauthwein

  • The break up and sinking of the tanker Prestige last month off the coast of Spain is sure to create grass root changes in the maritime market that far exceed the economical and ecological damage caused. While it is impossible to determine, exactly, what new measures may be, there is an undeniable feeling that the powers in charge are determined to ensure that this sort of event is never repeated again. The fate of the tanker and the political and procedural situation that preceded it were fodder for the front page of the Wall Street Journal recently, not exactly the publicity the maritime sector seeks. There are many issues that jump to the forefront of the Prestige incident, including, and in no particular order: Procedures regarding ports of safe refuge; Phase-out of single hull tankers; Survey and Inspection; Design, Construction and Maintenance; and Marine Salvage and Recovery.

    To the credit of all involved, the flow of information regarding the ship, its history, its status and its prospects was clear and free flowing from all corners, including SMIT, ABS, IMO and INTERTANKO. The availability and use of information could prove critical in assuring catastrophes such as Prestige are not repeated.

    The following is excerpted from IMO's release on the matter on November 20: "IMO's main concern now is to establish, as quickly and as thoroughly as possible, exactly what went wrong in this case so that the effectiveness of the regulatory framework that IMO has put in place can be properly assessed and action taken, if need be, to rectify any weaknesses or deficiencies identified. Under the provisions of SOLAS and MARPOL, the Flag State Administration is required to conduct an investigation into serious casualties. The Flag State authorities of the Bahamas are therefore urged to expedite their investigation into the incident and provide IMO with their findings, conclusions and recommendations." — Greg Trauthwein

  • , he did say that the Sulzer 52 UB is one of the oldest engines in the brand's range, and he envisages it being around for another 10 years. — Greg Trauthwei

  • , a third one will go up." The current goal: 2,000 employees in four years, with a slight majority of business coming from the commercial side. — Greg Trauthwei

  • industry, academia and government, local, regional and national. The conference highlight of day one was “Panel 5: View from the Top,” moderated by Greg Trauthwein, Editor of Marine Technology Reporter. The panel was unique in that it featured six industry executives participating in a free-wheeling discussion

  • scheme," Jebsen said, noting that Bermuda's tax-free environment was essential to Frontline competing against Greek and Singapore ship owners. — Greg Trauthwei

  • rational businessman, starting Adrick Marine 26 years ago and building it with his two sons, Richard and Thomas, to the success it is today. By Greg Trauthwein Adrick Marine, which provides custom air conditioning and refrigeration solutions to the marine industry, and is the largest supplier of

  • Through a tumultuous, ever-evolving and always colorful 137years, McAllister to constantly come out ahead. — by Greg Trauthwein Discussing the marine business with Captain Brian McAllister is much like sitting in a "Maritime History 101" course, in that his accumulated knowledge, experience and

  • to a passenger vessel,” something they do not have at a Chinese shipyard … yet, said Reyes.Carlos H. Reyes, Tillberg & Reyes Group Co., Ltd. (Photo: Greg Trauthwein)Show Me the MoneyWhile bringing together the requisite engineering and hotel outfitting talent was necessary, in China Tillberg & Reyes Group

  • more than a good start. – MarPro   Coming in March In advance of the “State of the Coast Guard” Maritime Reporter & Engineering News editor Greg Trauthwein secured a one-on-one with U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft for exclusive insights on the path, direction and speed of the U.S

  • Internet. The organization is the largest shipbuilding consortium in Europe, yet good prospects for growth lie in smaller, compact yards. — by Greg Trauthwein Upon first meeting the new leader of Aker Kvaerner Yards, the initial thought is "Good God, this guy is successful at a young age!" Once

  • MR had the opportunity to speak with Wdrtsilci's President and CEO Ole Johansson to discuss conditions in the international maritime market. — By Greg Trauthwein Challenges facing today's corporate manufacturing leaders — particularly those in the marine propulsion segment — are diverse and seemingly

  • Systems — which has overall responsibility for developing Sea SLICE — shared with MR/EN some of the secrets behind its success. — By Greg Trauthwein As the military evolves increasingly toward the collection, dissemination and integration of information in an attempt to locate, target

  • MT Apr-19#56  ROS manufacturing 
Photo: Greg Trauthwein
Photo: SIDUS Solutions
is)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 56

    inspection systems and control systems manufactured primar- ily for the oceanographic, nuclear and defense industries. ROS manufacturing Photo: Greg Trauthwein Photo: SIDUS Solutions is a cell-based operation, incorporating SubC Imaging’s Chad Collett at one-piece ? ow and a 5S lean manu- SIDUS Solutions

  • MT Apr-19#12  by renowned biogeochemist Dr. Greg Cutter, Profes-
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rable)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 12

    . Oceano- to help track and monitor changing ocean conditions. Our graphic working environments can be harsh, so du- team led by renowned biogeochemist Dr. Greg Cutter, Profes- T rable equipment is essential for successful underwater mis- sor of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Old Domin- sions. ion

  • MT Apr-19#8  May 2019. 
All Photos: Greg Trauthwein
  April 2019
8  
MTR
MTR)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 8

    Tech- Offshore Technology Conference in Inology related videos and inter- nology Reporter and sister-publica- Houston in early May 2019. All Photos: Greg Trauthwein April 2019 8 MTR MTR #3 (1-17).indd 8 4/15/2019 9:24:12 A

  • MT Apr-19#4 .
Associate Publisher & Editor
Gregory R. Trauthwein
By many)
    April 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    .com element of the combined maritime, port, logistics and, of course, subsea industries, in one tidy package. Associate Publisher & Editor Gregory R. Trauthwein By many accounts, this industry is on solid footing and on the rise again following the trauthwein@marinelink.com collapse and protracted

  • MT May-19#40  energy recovery.  
By Greg Trauthwein
Meeting with Raftery)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 40

    . The technology essentially allows offshore waves to be converted to surging surf waves, allowing much more effective wave energy recovery. By Greg Trauthwein Meeting with Raftery in Martin & Ottaway’s Tinton Falls, May 2019 40 MTR MTR #4 (34-49).indd 40 4/25/2019 9:56:47 A

  • MT May-19#20  Murphree, QinetiQ North America
Greg Folts, QinetiQ North America
Fig)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 20

    DOLPHIN Enabling Technology for Acoustic Systems Justin Manley, Just Innovation Michael Murphree, QinetiQ North America Greg Folts, QinetiQ North America Figure 1: The basic concept of DOLPHIN Image: QinetiQ North America May 2019 MTR 20 MTR #4 (18-33).indd 20 4/25/2019 9:30:09 AM

  • MT May-19#6 , academia, and government. 
Greg Folts is Director of Business)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 6

    & Contributors Manley Maslin Paschoa Stoichevski Tena executive with experience in startups, Folts Paschoa corporations, academia, and government. Greg Folts is Director of Business Claudio Paschoa is MTR’s contributor At Just Innovation Inc. he supports clients Development for Maritime Systems at

  • MT May-19#4  turning decidely ‘green’, 
Gregory R. Trauthwein
trauthwein@mari)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 4

    elusive engineering task, and the Associate Publisher & Editor advent of wave energy is still in its infancy. But with the world turning decidely ‘green’, Gregory R. Trauthwein trauthwein@marinelink.com there could be political will, and more importantly funding and subsidies, to help the wave energy industry

  • MT May-19#2  creates its own waves.
By Greg Trauthwein
Subsea Engineering
40
48)
    May 2019 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 2

    Renewables 40 Break a Wave A new wave generated power device promises to deliver energy at utility scale. How? It creates its own waves. By Greg Trauthwein Subsea Engineering 40 48 By-pass Super Fast SurfWEC When a troublesome pipeline beset with wax issues escalated into a blockage, new North

  • MR May-19#44  rules courtesy of 
By Greg Trauthwein
IMO2020 quickly approachin)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    MARINE PROPULSION • THOUGHT LEADERSHIP Power Players With new fuel rules courtesy of By Greg Trauthwein IMO2020 quickly approaching and emissions reduction and elim- ination on the agenda for the next 30 years, marine engine OEMs are on the front line, working with ship MAN B&W owners, marine fuel and

  • MR May-19#6  Director
Greg Trauthwein trauthwein@marinelink)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    , FL 33435-4009 Tel +1 561 732 4368 Fax +1 561 732 6984 Publisher John C. O’Malley jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher/Editorial Director Greg Trauthwein trauthwein@marinelink.com Vice President, Sales Rob Howard howard@marinelink.com Web Contributor Michelle Howard mhoward@marinelink.com Editorial

  • MR May-19#2  eye 2020 and beyond.
By Greg Trauthwein
 Cummins Marine
52
Workboa)
    May 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2

    D-Day for cruise ships on Norways fjords. By William Stoichevski NCE Maritime Clean Tech 44 Power Players Marine power OEMs eye 2020 and beyond. By Greg Trauthwein Cummins Marine 52 Workboats U.S.A. A deep dive into trends driving the U.S. workboat market. By Barry Parker Kirby MR #5 (1-9).indd 2 5/6/2019

  • MN May-19#43  deals could slow compared to 
Greg Miller is an award-winning)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 43

    pace in the pe- Kirby – at a lower price. riod ahead? That remains to be seen. Going forward, the pace of the Kir- by’s ? eet deals could slow compared to Greg Miller is an award-winning recent years for two reasons. journalist and editor. Most recent- ly, he served as the managing editor First, there are

  • MN May-19#40  strategy at work.
By Greg Miller
irby is de?  nitely)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 40

    . But the leader of the inland tank-barge sector is not growing for growth’s sake: a deeper look at the numbers shows a disciplined strategy at work. By Greg Miller irby is de? nitely the big gorilla in the inland double that of second-place Golar LNG. barge market,” af? rmed Jefferies analyst Randy On

  • MN May-19#8  AIWA is a national non-prof-
Greg Miller is an award- it)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 8

    Executive Com- cum laude from the University mittee member for the Nation- of Notre Dame. al Waterways Conference, Inc. The AIWA is a national non-prof- Greg Miller is an award- it organization celebrating its winning journalist and editor. 20th year in 2019 as the Voice Most recently, he served as of

  • MN May-19#4  Director
6 Editor’s Note
Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    ; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.com PUBLISHER John C. O’Malley • jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher & Editorial Director 6 Editor’s Note Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com Tel: 704-661-8475 8 Authors & Contributors Web Editor Eric Haun • haun@marinelin

  • MN May-19#2  strategy at work.  
By Greg Miller
INLAND FINANCE
4H)
    May 2019 - Marine News page: 2

    of the inland tank-barge sector is By Randy O’Neill not growing for growth’s sake: a deeper look at the numbers shows a disciplined strategy at work. By Greg Miller INLAND FINANCE 4H

  • MP Q1-19#4  Publisher/Editorial Director
Gregory R. Trauthwein
tional)
    Mar/Apr 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 4

    .com 1 Michael Birge is president of Hub Interna- the Miami River. He is a graduate of Florida Associate Publisher/Editorial Director Gregory R. Trauthwein tional Transportation. State University with majors in English and trauthwein@marinelink.com Government. His articles have appeared

  • MR Apr-19#28  and more ef? cient.
By Greg Trauthwein
hile there are certainly)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 28

    decision-making processes while helping to reduce crew size (and cost), and ultimately helping to make ship operations safer and more ef? cient. By Greg Trauthwein hile there are certainly a num- positioned as a step-change technology where onboard manned ship” said Mikko Lepisto, Senior Vice Presi- ber

  • MR Apr-19#25  of ‘?  oating wind.’
By Greg Trauthwein
winds of the North)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 25

    Skarheim Onsum, SVP, Head of Wind Aker Solutions, for her view on the path ahead and the growing role and promising future of ‘? oating wind.’ By Greg Trauthwein winds of the North Sea have created a test bed and industrial Please give an overview of your responsibilities as training center for what is

  • MR Apr-19#8  as Clean Harbors 
Photo: Greg Trauthwein
Corporation, the)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 8

    as the school’s largest fundraiser for cadet scholarships. Making it all possible, in part, were in- dustry sponsors such as Clean Harbors Photo: Greg Trauthwein Corporation, the Marshall Islands Reg- istry, the American Bureau of Shipping, marine in World War I. During the Great of International Registries

  • MR Apr-19#6 , Humans & Technology
Greg Trauthwein trauthwein@marinelink)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 6

    561 732 6984 Publishers John E. O’Malley John C. O’Malley jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher/Editorial Director Ships, Humans & Technology Greg Trauthwein trauthwein@marinelink.com Vice President, Sales Rob Howard howard@marinelink.com Web Contributor Michelle Howard mhoward@marinelink.com Editorial

  • MR Apr-19#2  ?  oating wind.
By Greg Trauthwein
Aker Solutions
28
Unmanned)
    April 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 2

    Offshore 24 Ask Astrid Astrid Skarheim Onsum, SVP, Head of Wind, Aker Solutions, discusses the value proposition of offshore ? oating wind. By Greg Trauthwein Aker Solutions 28 Unmanned Future? The future of autonomy is now, but it’s not necessarily ‘unmanned.’ By Greg Trauthwein Sea Machines 38 Global

  • MN Apr-19#4  & Editorial Director
Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink)
    April 2019 - Marine News page: 4

    (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271 www.marinelink.com PUBLISHER John C. O’Malley • jomalley@marinelink.com Associate Publisher & Editorial Director Greg Trauthwein • trauthwein@marinelink.com Editor Joseph Keefe • keefe@marinelink.com Tel: 704-661-8475 6 Editor’s Note Web Editor Eric Haun • haun@marinelink