KHD Introduces Two Systems For Worldwide Engine Monitoring Via Satellite Communications

Klockner-Humboldt-Deutz AG (KHD) of Cologne, West Germany, has recently introduced two centralized service systems for the owners of Deutz marine diesel engines.

Called Ship Information Service (SES) and Ships' Information Processing System (SIPS), they are designed as a new method for lowering engine operating cost, increasing operational reliability, and reducing workload for shipboard personnel.

How does the SIS work? The ships's engine plant is fitted with a number of sensors that record the characteristic engine operation data. These data are transmitted via satellite to the KHD computer center, where the computer compares the periodically transmitted operating data with the figures recorded in the test report made at the time of engine acceptance at the KHD works, and the basic data entered during engine commissioning by the customer.

The results of the individual data comparison are evaluated by skilled KHD engineers, who prepare an engine status report with trend analysis, which is sent to the shipowner together with recommendations regarding necessary maintenance work. Based upon the information received, the shipowner will decide on the measures to be taken.

The SIS system further includes an individual maintenance schedule tailored to the actual operating conditions of a particular engine installation, providing a base for longterm planning.

SIS furnishes the shipowner not only with an efficient means for cost-saving planning of maintenance and service work, but also with engine records over long service periods. Unforeseen lay days can be avoided, and the engine can be put to optimal use. Participation in the SIS system will allow the application of centrally accumulated experience to individual engine plants.

SIPS Sends Data Automatically Whereas the SIS system depends on the crew taking a log of the engine readings and then transmitting it to the KHD computer by radio for evaluation, the "big brother" Ships' Information Processing System makes maximum use of microelectronics and the latest forms of data transmission. Thus, the engine data is acquired by sensors and pickups and then transmitted via satellite by a microprocessor on board direct to the central computer for processing.

Extremely encouraging results have been obtained with the SIS system on a number of tankers. As a member of a shipping consortium, KHD is installing a SIPS unit on the motor vessel Epsilongas. Apart from engine data, the system can also transmit other information of interest to the shipowner, such as crew, navigation, and cargo data.

The benefits of the SIPS system, in addition to speed, greater safety, and lower labor costs, are in the ability to control maintenance activities accurately, i.e., plan the place and time of the work in advance, and organize the necessary manpower and spares.

The continuing spread and efficient utilization of microelectronics are undoubtably playing their part in achieving these goals.

For additional information and free literature on the KHD systems, Circle 22 on Reader Service CardSIPS Sends Data Automatically Whereas the SIS system depends on the crew taking a log of the engine readings and then transmitting it to the KHD computer by radio for evaluation, the "big brother" Ships' Information Processing System makes maximum use of microelectronics and the latest forms of data transmission. Thus, the engine data is acquired by sensors and pickups and then transmitted via satellite by a microprocessor on board direct to the central computer for processing.

Extremely encouraging results have been obtained with the SIS system on a number of tankers. As a member of a shipping consortium, KHD is installing a SIPS unit on the motor vessel Epsilongas. Apart from engine data, the system can also transmit other information of interest to the shipowner, such as crew, navigation, and cargo data.

The benefits of the SIPS system, in addition to speed, greater safety, and lower labor costs, are in the ability to control maintenance activities accurately, i.e., plan the place and time of the work in advance, and organize the necessary manpower and spares.

The continuing spread and efficient utilization of microelectronics are undoubtably playing their part in achieving these goals.

For additional information and free literature on the KHD systems, Circle 22 on Reader Service Card

Maritime Reporter Magazine, page 45,  Jan 1985 California

Read KHD Introduces Two Systems For Worldwide Engine Monitoring Via Satellite Communications in Pdf, Flash or Html5 edition of January 1985 Maritime Reporter

Other stories from January 1985 issue

Content

Maritime Reporter

First published in 1881 Maritime Reporter is the world's largest audited circulation publication serving the global maritime industry.